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Lindsay OConnor

View the Latest Discoveries in Aesthetics, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

September JDD

The September issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on aesthetic treatments, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Read the September JDD Now

Aesthetics, Public Health, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

The September issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on aesthetic treatments, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Article Highlights

 

Editor's Picks

 

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

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iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

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A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Topical Cannabinoids for the Management of Psoriasis Vulgaris: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

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Featured Article

Featured Article

The interest in use of medical cannabis for chronic dermatologic conditions such as psoriasis, eczema, and acne has been growing mostly owing to rapidly emerging decriminalization across the country and impressive commercially driven popularization of a variety of cannabinoid preparations including topical forms such as creams, salves, lotions, lubricants, and many others.

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This report details a case of a young man with psoriasis managed with topical cannabinoids.

Adam J. Friedman MD, Kimia Momeni BS, Mikhail Kogan MD

 

The interest in use of medical cannabis for chronic dermatologic conditions such as psoriasis, eczema, and acne has been growing mostly owing to rapidly emerging decriminalization across the country and impressive commercially driven popularization of a variety of cannabinoid preparations including topical forms such as creams, salves, lotions, lubricants, and many others.

However, while the market is exponentially growing, the rate at which mechanistic and clinical evidence supporting the use of cannabinoids in a litany of diseases is significantly slower. In fact, Robinson et al highlighted significant gaps in dermatologists understanding of the biology of cannabinoids and comfort with this space, further highlighting the great need to disseminate information throughout the medical community.

Along this vein, we present a case of a young man with psoriasis managed with topical cannabinoids.

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

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A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

The Therapeutic Use of Antioxidants for Melasma

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Featured Article

Featured Article

With a well demonstrated impact on quality of life, melasma is a common cause for seeking dermatologic care. There is no universally efficacious therapy, so combination treatment is preferred. Therapies include topical hypopigmenting agents, laser treatment, microneedling, chemical peels, radiofrequency, and oral medications.1 Furthermore, it is critical for patients to avoid exacerbating factors.

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In this review, authors discuss the well-defined role of oxidative stress in melasma and the therapeutic efficacy of various antioxidants for patients suffering from melasma, focusing on studies investigating the role of vitamin C, azelaic acid, cysteamine, glutathione, carotenoids, and numerous other antioxidants in disorders of hyperpigmentation.

Kayla M. Babbush BS, Remy A. Babbush BS, Amor Khachemoune MD FAAD FACMS

 

Melasma is a chronic and acquired skin disorder of hyperpigmentation that presents with symmetric hypermelanosis of sun exposed areas, especially the face. Disease prevalence, ranging from 1 to 50%, varies with gender, ethnicity, skin phenotype, and sun exposure.

The pathogenesis of melasma is incompletely understood, which poses a challenge for disease management. Causative factors include genetics, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, cosmetics, pregnancy, hormonal therapy, phototoxic drugs, and various medications.

Melasma is evaluated by Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI) score, modified MASI (mMASI) score, Melasma Quality of Life Scale (MelasQoL), colorimetry, and mexametry.

With a well demonstrated impact on quality of life, melasma is a common cause for seeking dermatologic care. There is no universally efficacious therapy, so combination treatment is preferred. Therapies include topical hypopigmenting agents, laser treatment, microneedling, chemical peels, radiofrequency, and oral medications.1 Furthermore, it is critical for patients to avoid exacerbating factors.

The skin, a protective organ critical in homeostasis, is the site of numerous biochemical processes, including the generation of free radicals, namely reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are necessary for biological signaling processes, but, in excess, ROS can damage biomolecules.3 There is clear evidence of oxidative stress in melasma.

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Increased Trend of Cosmetic Procedures in Patients With Psoriasis Who Attain 75% or Greater Improvement

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Featured Article

Featured Article

A survey was conducted at a single dermatology center to determine if there was an increased trend in cosmetic procedures in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis who attained 75% or greater reduction of the body surface area (BSA) with biologic agents and oral systemic therapies, and if this was related to an improvement in quality of life following psoriasis clearance.

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A survey was conducted at a single dermatology center to determine if there was an increased trend in cosmetic procedures in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis who attained 75% or greater reduction of the body surface area (BSA) with biologic agents and oral systemic therapies, and if this was related to an improvement in quality of life following psoriasis clearance.

Michelle E. Walters MD, Delphine J. Lee MD PhD, Paul S. Yamauchi MD PhD

Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition with a negative impact on patient quality of life. The National Psoriasis Foundation states that an acceptable response to psoriasis treatment is at least a 75% reduction in body surface area (BSA) at 3 months after initiation of treatment.

This reduction in BSA has been associated with improvement in quality of life, with clearance rates of clear to almost clear leading to an even greater improvement in quality of life.2,3 To date, there have been no studies examining the relationship between improvement in quality of life following a reduction in BSA, and the increased utilization of cosmetic procedures. Here, we examine the relationship between quality of life and the use of various cosmetic procedures in patients treated for psoriasis with systemic and biologic therapies who achieved at least 75% reduction in BSA.

This was a retrospective study assessing quality of life and the use of cosmetic procedures in psoriasis patients after attaining a75% or greater reduction of the body surface area with biologic agents only, systemic agents only, or a combination of both. This study was conducted according to the ethical guidelines of the 1975 Declaration of Helsinki. All patients provided informed consent.

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Expiring Soon: Capturing Consensus and Cutting Out Misconceptions regarding the Aesthetic Skin of Color Consumer

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CME Activities

"Capturing Consensus and Cutting Out misConceptions regarding the Aesthetic Skin of Color Consumer"

Who knows what’s best/worst for facial aesthetics in the skin of color patient? No really who? Because there is a great deal of folklore and ballyhoo related to what one can and cannot do, forgetting even what the patients think.
Enter Dr. Andrew Alexis, Professor and Chair of the Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West and Director of the Skin of Color Center, with his experienced SOC entourage to marry personal experience and evidence (what a beautiful couple!).
Tune in to hear how it all went down. You couldn’t be in the room where it happened, but after this podcast you might have well been. Learn from one of the greats as I pick his brain on all things, medical and aesthetic, SOC. C to it you don’t miss this podcast.

To receive a CME certificate of participation, you should:

  • Listen to the Podcast Episode here
  • This CME examination requires a 70% pass mark to receive the CME credit and certificate.

Following online completion of the posttest and evaluation, a certificate of participation will be available for download/printing immediately.

Take CME Now

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Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

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Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…

Expiring Soon: Capturing Consensus and Cutting Out Misconceptions regarding the Aesthetic Skin of Color Consumer

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0.5 CME Credits Who knows what’s best/worst for facial aesthetics in the skin of color patient? No really who? Because there is a great deal of folklore and ballyhoo related…

Re-examining the Optimal Use of Neuromodulators and the Changing Landscape: A Consensus Panel Update

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1 CME CreditSince initial US Food and Drug Administration approval of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) for aesthetic use in 2002, clinical evidence and experience with BoNT-A and understanding of…

Post-Inflammatory Hyperpigmentation: A Review of Treatment Strategies

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Featured Article

Featured Article

Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) is a reactive process resulting from increased melanin or abnormal distribution of melanin secondary to inflammatory skin conditions, dermatologic therapies, and external stimuli. Because PIH is a common condition that has a substantial effect on the quality of life, an understanding of its treatment modalities is essential. Though there are many therapeutic strategies for hyperpigmentary conditions such as melasma that are described in the literature, fewer studies focus on PIH. This article aims to provide a comprehensive literature review of therapies specifically used to treat PIH, such as topical combinations, chemical peels, and lasers.

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This article aims to provide a comprehensive literature review of therapies specifically used to treat PIH, such as topical combinations, chemical peels, and lasers.

Adele Shenoy BA, Raman Madan MD

Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) is a reactive process resulting from increased melanin or abnormal distribution of melanin, secondary to inflammatory skin conditions such as acne, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, and psoriasis, as well as external factors such as burns and radiation therapy. An understanding of treatment strategies for PIH is essential, as it has a large impact on the quality of life.

Though there are many therapeutic strategies for hyperpigmentary conditions such as melasma that are described in the literature, fewer studies specifically address PIH. Thus, we conducted a literature review on PubMed using key words “post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation” OR “postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.”

Studies that did not specifically address PIH and articles that were not published in English were excluded. Additional studies were obtained by scanning references. This review adds to the current literature by discussing the evidence for topical therapies, chemical peels, and laser therapy used specifically for hyperpigmentation from PIH.

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Article Cited in this Post

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

| Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Systemic Antibiotics in the Management of Acne: Issues and Considerations for Optimal Care

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JDD Multimedia

JDD Podcast

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"Systemic Antibiotics in the Management of Acne: Issues and Considerations for Optimal Care"

Drs. Joslyn Kirby and Adam Friedman

 

WEEEEEEERE BACK! Join host Dr. Adam Friedman for lively and learned discussion with Dr. Joslyn Kirby on one of the most common, chronic, soul-crushing complaints… Acne Vulgaris. It is, from a pathophysiological standpoint, a biological sh*t show, but you need to understand it to develop the best treatment plans. We talk inflammation, first line approaches, setting patient expectations and compliance. We dive deep into the differences between broad-spectrum and narrow-spectrum antibiotics, when to use them, and for how long. (Spoiler alert: NOT TOO LONG!). In our efforts to be stewards of meaningful antibiotic use and adversaries of antimicrobial resistance, narrow-spectrum antibiotics are the future!

This enduring activity is supported by an independent medical education grant provided by Almirall, LLC.

Upon completion of this enduring, internet-based educational activity, participants should be able to:

  • Review current scientific understanding of pathophysiology of acne
  • Summarize acne treatment strategies utilizing systemic antibiotics
  • Differentiate safety and efficacy of broad and narrow spectrum antibiotics indicated for acne treatment
  • Cite the benefits of narrow spectrum antibiotic use in acne therapy
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Disclosures:
  • Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD – Grant/Research: Aclaris, CPN, Almirall. Consultant: SanovaWorks, Oakstone Institute, L’oreal, La Roche Posay, Galderma, Aveeno, Valeant, Microcures, Biogen, Pfizer, G&W Laboratories, Novartis, Occulus, Intraderm, Encore, Exeltis, Menlo, Lilly, Aclaris, Dermira, Berg, Allergan, Zylo Therapeutics, Hoth. Speaker’s Bureau: Regeneron, Dermira, Janssen, AbbVie. Major Stock Shareholder: Zylo, Minorcures.
  • Joslyn R. Sciacca Kirby, MD – No relevant disclosures.

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Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

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iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

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iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman   Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with…

Best Practices & Practical Pearls For Safely Reopening Derm Practices

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JDD Multimedia

JDD Podcast

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How to Listen

This video series and podcast are supported in part by Alastin Skincare, Endo Aesthetics, Ortho Dermatologics, and Sciton

Best Practices & Practical Pearls for Safely Reopening Derm Practices

Drs. Adam Friedman, Jeffery Dover, Nazanin Saedi, Kavita Mariwalla, Terrence Keaney & Thomas E. Rohrer

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected dermatology practices across the country and around the world. In the face of a change that no one was really prepared for, Dr. Jeffrey S. Dover, in partnership with the JDD, invited a panel of dermatology Key Opinion Leaders to share their experience via video as they reopen their practices. We have gathered the audio from all of these videos and assembled them into an easy to listen to podcast filled with practical pearls and best practices from Drs. Jeffrey Dover, Nazanin Saedi, Kavita Mariwalla, Terrence Keaney, and Thomas Rohrer.

Want a refresher on the use of OCPs in Acne? Interested in learning how to initiate a patient based survey study? Just curious how a leader in the field gets an uninterested adolescent to be compliant and engaged in his/her acne care? These are just a few of the practical pearls provided.

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Watch the companion videos here:
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Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

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iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman   Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with…

View on Demand: Restoring Skin Barrier Function – Why Formulation Matters

By COVID-19 Webinars, JDD Webinars, Skin Barrier Function No Comments

JDD Multimedia

Webinar Premiere

“Restoring Skin Barrier Function: Why Formulation Matters"

With the implications of hand-washing protocol during the COVID-19 pandemic, proper skin-barrier restoration is essential, especially for people with dry, eczema-prone skin.

Tune in as Professor Michael J. Cork BSC MB PhD FRCP and Professor Simon G. Danby discuss the skin-barrier restoring effect of a cream containing ceramides in a multi-vesicular emulsion for people with eczema-prone skin, as well as other skin conditions that require skin-barrier restoration.

Faculty


Professor Michael J. Cork

BSC MB PhD FRCP

Joined the University of Sheffield in 1991 as a lecturer in dermatology whilst continuing as a practising dermatologist for the NHS in Sheffield. Previously, a Registrar in Dermatology at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, and a Registrar in Respiratory General Medicine at Leeds General Infirmary.

Professor Cork has been closely involved with research in many areas of dermatology; including Atopic Eczema(dermatitis), Psoriasis, Vitiligo and the Genetics of Skin Disease. Major current research work is aimed at identifying gene–environment interactions in the development of atopic dermatitis leading to skin barrier breakdown and the understanding of how topical agents interact with the skin barrier; using this information to enhance the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

Currently the Head of Sheffield Dermatology Research in the Department of Infection, Immunity & Cardiovascular Disease at the University of Sheffield Medical School and Honorary Consultant Dermatologist to both Sheffield Children´s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and to Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

 


Professor Simon G. Danby
PhD, BSC

Originally trained in biochemistry and molecular biology, Professor Danby  joined the University of Sheffield in 2005 as a post-doctoral scientist in the Academic Unit of Biomedical Genetics.

In this position, he worked exclusively for York Pharma on the early stage development of novel therapeutics and diagnostics for atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and malignant melanoma.

In 2009, he joined the Academic Unit of Dermatology Research as a post-doctoral Research Associate. The focus of his research in this role was improving our understanding of the structure and function of the epidermal (skin) barrier and its role in the development of disorders such as atopic dermatitis (AD).

At the beginning of 2012, Professor Danby  was awarded a 3-year unencumbered research fellowship from Johnson & Johnson to continue my research on the skin barrier and set up a dedicated research facility for conducting human skin research.

Since then, he has continued to conduct and lead translational dermatology research as an independent fellow.

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

NEW Webinar – Differentiating Approach to Acne Therapy: Women Vs. Men

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Join Leon H. Kircik, MD and Julie Harper, MD as they discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris. October 27th, 2020 7:00 PM - 8:00…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

The Latest Research & Discoveries in Psoriasis, Anti-Aging, Aesthetics, and Medical Dermatology

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Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

The August issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Psoriasis, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Read the JDD Now

Psoriasis, Public Health, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology

The August issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on  psoriasis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Article Highlights

Editor's Picks

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Featured ArticlesJDD Highlights
October 22, 2020

View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…
JDD Webinars
October 14, 2020

NEW Webinar – Differentiating Approach to Acne Therapy: Women Vs. Men

Join Leon H. Kircik, MD and Julie Harper, MD as they discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris. October 27th, 2020 7:00 PM - 8:00…
Podcast HighlightsSkin Cancer
October 7, 2020

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

Diagnosis and Management of Primary Hyperhidrosis: Practical Guidance and Current Therapy Update

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Skin of Color Update

Featured Article

With the busy practitioner and dermatology resident in mind, we provide here a disease state primer for hyperhidrosis, a top-line review of the breadth of literature underscoring the overall burden of the disease, a practical guide to differential diagnosis, and an update on current treatment approaches, including for the most common form of the condition, primary axillary hyperhidrosis.

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A case study on the importance of early and effective management strategies for those suffering with hyperhidrosis.

Joe Gorelick MSN FNP-C, Adam Friedman MD

In the most simplistic definition, hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating. However, it is largely misunderstood, often goes undiagnosed, and continues to be inadequately managed for many patients. Approximately half of those who self-identify as having excessive sweating do not discuss their symptoms with healthcare professionals despite the severe negative impact on their quality of life; reasons for this include the misconception that hyperhidrosis is not a medical condition and that no treatments exist.

In one study, only half of patients who reported their symptoms to a healthcare professional were ultimately diagnosed with primary hyperhidrosis, which may reflect a reality of widespread underdiagnosis of the condition.1 In a survey conducted by the International Hyperhidrosis Society (IHhS), 48.9% of patients waited 10 or more years before seeking medical help for their excessive sweating.2

With the busy practitioner and dermatology resident in mind, here we provide a disease state primer for hyperhidrosis, a top-line review of the breadth of literature underscoring the overall burden of the disease, a practical guide to differential diagnosis, and an update on current treatment approaches.3, 4 In addition, a case study in primary axillary (underarm) hyperhidrosis is presented to provide a real-life perspective from the clinic on the importance of early and effective management strategies for those suffering with hyperhidrosis.

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Once-Daily Polymeric Tazarotene 0.045% Lotion for Moderate-to-Severe Acne: Pooled Phase 3 Analysis by Sex

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Skin of Color Update

Featured Article

Acne is a common dermatologic condition, affecting up to 85% of adolescents and young adults.1 The prevalence of adult acne appears to be increasing in both females and males; however, there are differences in treatment needs and physiology between the sexes that should be taken into account when prescribing acne treatments.

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Data from these studies were pooled and analyzed post hoc to evaluate outcomes by sex

Leon H. Kircik MD, Linda Stein Gold MD, Kenneth Beer MD, Jerry Tan MD, Hilary Baldwin MD, Eric Guenin PharmD PHD MPH, Robert Kang MS, Jognson Varughesei

Acne is a common dermatologic condition, affecting up to 85% of adolescents and young adults.1 The prevalence of adult acne appears to be increasing in both females and males; however, there are differences in treatment needs and physiology between the sexes that should be taken into account when prescribing acne treatments. While most patients experience onset during adolescence, persistent adult acne is more common in female patients.

Additionally, females are more likely to experience recurrences of acne throughout their lives, requiring long-term maintenance treatment.3,4 In terms of skin physiology, males tend to have less epidermal water loss, higher sebum production, and a lower pH than females.5 In females, sebum production is not only lower, it also decreases with age leading to drier skin later in life.5 Along these lines, females are more likely to report dry, sensitive skin,4 which may become more apparent with age.6 These differences between female and male patients with acne could affect treatment efficacy, tolerability, or adherence.

Topical retinoids are the mainstay of acne treatment due to their comedolytic and anti-inflammatory properties.7 Several retinoids are commercially available (eg, tretinoin, adapalene, trifarotene, and tazarotene)1,8 but studies have shown that tazarotene 0.1% cream may be more effective than tretinoin 0.025% or adapalene 0.1% or 0.3% in treating acne.9-11 While the efficacy and safety of topical retinoids are well established,12,13 adverse effects such as irritation, erythema, peeling, and dryness can occur in the first weeks of treatment, especially at higher concentrations.7,12 To address these issues, a new tazarotene 0.045% lotion formulation was developed utilizing polymeric emulsion technology.14 An oil-in-water emulsion—structured by a three-dimensional mesh matrix containing tazarotene along with hydrating and moisturizing agents—allows for more uniform release and increased absorption of ingredients. This easily spreadable and easy-to-use lotion formulation also allows for a lower tazarotene concentration, and when combined with optimized delivery of active and hydrating ingredients, may improve tolerability.14

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…