Aesthetics

The Therapeutic Use of Antioxidants for Melasma

By August 25, 2020No Comments

Featured Article

With a well demonstrated impact on quality of life, melasma is a common cause for seeking dermatologic care. There is no universally efficacious therapy, so combination treatment is preferred. Therapies include topical hypopigmenting agents, laser treatment, microneedling, chemical peels, radiofrequency, and oral medications.1 Furthermore, it is critical for patients to avoid exacerbating factors.

Read more

In this review, authors discuss the well-defined role of oxidative stress in melasma and the therapeutic efficacy of various antioxidants for patients suffering from melasma, focusing on studies investigating the role of vitamin C, azelaic acid, cysteamine, glutathione, carotenoids, and numerous other antioxidants in disorders of hyperpigmentation.

Kayla M. Babbush BS, Remy A. Babbush BS, Amor Khachemoune MD FAAD FACMS

 

Melasma is a chronic and acquired skin disorder of hyperpigmentation that presents with symmetric hypermelanosis of sun exposed areas, especially the face. Disease prevalence, ranging from 1 to 50%, varies with gender, ethnicity, skin phenotype, and sun exposure.

The pathogenesis of melasma is incompletely understood, which poses a challenge for disease management. Causative factors include genetics, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, cosmetics, pregnancy, hormonal therapy, phototoxic drugs, and various medications.

Melasma is evaluated by Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI) score, modified MASI (mMASI) score, Melasma Quality of Life Scale (MelasQoL), colorimetry, and mexametry.

With a well demonstrated impact on quality of life, melasma is a common cause for seeking dermatologic care. There is no universally efficacious therapy, so combination treatment is preferred. Therapies include topical hypopigmenting agents, laser treatment, microneedling, chemical peels, radiofrequency, and oral medications.1 Furthermore, it is critical for patients to avoid exacerbating factors.

The skin, a protective organ critical in homeostasis, is the site of numerous biochemical processes, including the generation of free radicals, namely reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are necessary for biological signaling processes, but, in excess, ROS can damage biomolecules.3 There is clear evidence of oxidative stress in melasma.

Read Full Article Now
Article Cited in this Post

You May Also Like

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Photoprotection, Skin of Color | No Comments
In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

| Aesthetics, CME Activities, Featured Articles | No Comments
Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…