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Skin of color update Archives - JDDonline - Journal of Drugs in Dermatology

An Analysis of Skin of Color Dermatology Related Content on Instagram

By Aesthetics, Skin of Color No Comments

Skin of Color Update

Featured Article

Patients are utilizing internet resources and social media to learn of dermatologic conditions and possible treatments. However, no studies about skin of color dermatology content available on different social media platforms have been done.

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An Analysis of Skin of Color Dermatology Related Content on Instagram

Taylor M Wells BS, Chandler W Rundle MD, Mindy D Szeto BS, Colby Presley , Robert P Dellavalle MD PhD MSPH

 

The population of the United States is becoming increasingly more diverse. The most recent US census showed that while non-Hispanic whites currently make up the majority of the population at 198 million, they remain the only segment of the US population in which deaths outpace the number of births. At the same time, other racial and ethnic groups are experiencing population growth.1 In fact, it is projected that by 2050, over half the US population will be individuals of color.

The lack of dermatologists of color combined with the small percent of dermatologic education dedicated to patients with skin of color3 has created racial disparity in the delivery of care to patients of color. Gorbatenko-Roth et al has confirmed that patients of color are concerned that race-discordant dermatologists do not have specific knowledge of their skin and hair conditions and/ or routine skin and hair care regimens. Additionally, there is concern that these dermatologists do not offer individualized treatments for their disorders.2

Initiatives such as the Diversity Champion Initiative of the AAD’s Diversity Task Force, aimed at diversifying dermatology and increasing exposure to skin of color dermatology during training, have been implemented but these changes are systemic and slower to take effect.4

In the interim, patients are utilizing internet resources and social media to learn of dermatologic conditions and possible treatments. However, no studies about skin of color dermatology content available on different social media platforms have been done. Here, we sought to explore Instagram to identify skin of color-related dermatology content being posted, characterize the generators of this content, and compare the characteristics of content generated by board certified dermatologists with other Instagram users.

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Skin of Color Update Virtual

The Experts’ Forum for Multicultural Dermatology

The US population is growing and evolving and the clinical profile of the average patient presenting to the dermatologist is changing. One in three Americans self-identify as member of a non-caucasian racial or ethnic group. Data shows as of 2020, individuals of non-Caucasian, multi-racial descent will comprise more than 50% of the population.

Skin of Color Update Virtual 2020 Topics

 

  • Hair Loss
  • Acne
  • Rosacea
  • Skin Care with Cosmeceuticals
  • PRP
  • Psoriasis
  • Scalp Psoriasis
  • Skin Cancer
  • and more!
Register for SOCU 2020 Now

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Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Photoprotection, Skin of Color | No Comments
In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…

View the Latest Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology Articles Now

| JDD Highlights, Skin of Color | No Comments
The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.…

An Analysis of Skin of Color Dermatology Related Content on Instagram

| Aesthetics, Skin of Color | No Comments
Patients are utilizing internet resources and social media to learn of dermatologic conditions and possible treatments. However, no studies about skin of color dermatology content available on different social media…

Twenty Nail Dystrophy; a case report from Disharc, Nepal

By Skin of Color, SOCU Poster Abstracts No Comments

Skin of Color Update

Featured Poster Abstract

The following is a selected scientific poster abstract from the 2019 Skin of Color Update.

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"Twenty Nail Dystrophy; a case report from Disharc, Nepal"

Author: Prarthana Adhikari, MD

The following is a selected scientific poster abstract from the 2019 Skin of Color Update.

Twenty-nail dystrophy (TND) is rare and less reported chronic inflammatory disorder affecting nail matrix of all twenty nails. Literature reports mainly as idiopathic but are also associated with cutaneous or systemic disorders among childhood. It clinically presents as rough, thin, brittle lustureless nails with multiple pits. The diagnosis was made clinically but pathological study shows spongiosis and exocytosis of inflammatory cells in epithelium.

Case Report: We present a case of 9-year-old boy with complaints of rough, thin and pitted nails. He was asymptomatic but was under antithyroid medication for hypothyroidism. His only concern was bad appearance. He was given mild topical steroids and emollients. After 6 months of follow-up, patient has shown sign of improvement. Therefore, TND can also be inferenced as self-limiting disease with minimum treatment can have positive reference.

Skin of Color Scientific Poster Abstracts

View a curated selection of scientific poster abstracts from the Skin of Color Update conference below.

Explore More

Skin of Color Update Virtual

The Experts’ Forum for Multicultural Dermatology

The US population is growing and evolving and the clinical profile of the average patient presenting to the dermatologist is changing. One in three Americans self-identify as member of a non-caucasian racial or ethnic group. Data shows as of 2020, individuals of non-Caucasian, multi-racial descent will comprise more than 50% of the population.

Skin of Color Update Virtual 2020 Topics

 

  • Hair Loss
  • Acne
  • Rosacea
  • Skin Care with Cosmeceuticals
  • PRP
  • Psoriasis
  • Scalp Psoriasis
  • Skin Cancer
  • and more!
Register for SOCU 2020 Now

You May Also Like

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

The Science of Sun Protection

| Podcast | No Comments
Episode 1 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often…

Impact of High Coverage Make-up Coverage against Visible Light Exposure

By Aesthetics, Skin of Color No Comments

Skin of Color Update

Featured Poster Abstract

The following is a selected scientific poster abstract from the 2019 Skin of Color Update.

Learn More

"Impact of High Coverage Make-up Coverage against Visible Light Exposure"

Authors: Hawasatu Dumbuya, PhD & Janet Wangari-Talbot, PhD

The following is a selected scientific poster abstract from the 2019 Skin of Color Update.

Historically, photo-protection studies have focused on UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm) protection. However, it is now evident that visible light (400-700 nm) causes skin darkening and contribute to worsening of dyschromia, particularly in individuals with Fitzpatrick phototype III and higher.

Currently, few sunscreens provide protection against visible light. Due to their capabilities in absorbing and reflecting visible light, topical products containing pigments and/or metal oxides (i.e. iron oxide, zinc oxide, and titanium dioxide), can provide additional protection against harmful effects of that spectrum.

Here, we demonstrate that lightly or darkly tinted high coverage pigmented foundation containing iron oxides or a combination of iron oxide and titanium dioxide significantly protected against visible light-induced pigmentation when compared to a mineral SPF50+ sunscreen in Fitzpatrick IV individuals when assessed by visual grading and by chromameter.

Our results show the benefits of high coverage pigmented foundation, containing different concentrations of iron oxide and titanium dioxide, in offering visible light photoprotection. Depending on the metal oxides concentrations, these formulations have the potential to extend protection beyond UV for multiple skin phototypes.

Skin of Color Scientific Poster Abstracts

View a curated selection of scientific poster abstracts from the Skin of Color Update conference below.

Explore More

Skin of Color Update Virtual

The Experts’ Forum for Multicultural Dermatology

The US population is growing and evolving and the clinical profile of the average patient presenting to the dermatologist is changing. One in three Americans self-identify as member of a non-caucasian racial or ethnic group. Data shows as of 2020, individuals of non-Caucasian, multi-racial descent will comprise more than 50% of the population.

Skin of Color Update Virtual 2020 Topics

 

  • Hair Loss
  • Acne
  • Rosacea
  • Skin Care with Cosmeceuticals
  • PRP
  • Psoriasis
  • Scalp Psoriasis
  • Skin Cancer
  • and more!
Register for SOCU 2020 Now

You May Also Like

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

The Science of Sun Protection

| Podcast | No Comments
Episode 1 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often…

2019 Scientific Poster Abstracts from Skin of Color Update

By Derm Community

Education Credits

September 12: 8.5 | September 13 = 4.5

Category 1
Creighton University Health Sciences Continuing Education designates this live activity for a maximum of 13 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) TM. Physicians should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

AAPA accepts AMA category 1 credit for the PRA from organizations accredited by ACCME

Nurse CE
Creighton University Health Sciences Continuing Education designates this activity for 13 contact hours for nurses.  Nurses should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

View a selection of scientific poster abstracts from the 2019 Skin of Color Update below.

SOCU is the largest CE event dedicated to trending evidence-based research and new practical pearls for treating skin types III – VI, will be held  held September 12 – 13 at the Sheraton Times Square in New York City.

Each year, SOCU presents exclusive content and learning opportunities on topics including,  Acne, Rosacea, Psoriasis, Scalp Psoriasis, Skin Cancer, Atopic Dermatitis, Hidradenitis Suppurativa, Nail and Fungal Disorders, and how they affect the patient of color.

 

Impact of High Coverage Make-up Coverage against Visible Light Exposure

Historically, photo-protection studies have focused on UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm) protection. However, it is now evident that visible light (400-700 nm) causes skin darkening and contribute to worsening of dyschromia, particularly in individuals with Fitzpatrick phototype III and higher.

View Now

Twenty Nail Dystrophy; a case report from DISHARC, Nepal

Twenty-nail dystrophy (TND) is rare and less reported chronic inflammatory disorder affecting nail matrix of all twenty nails. Literature reports mainly as idiopathic but are also associated with cutaneous or systemic disorders among childhood. It clinically presents as rough, thin, brittle lustureless nails with multiple pits. The diagnosis was made clinically but pathological study shows spongiosis and exocytosis of inflammatory cells in epithelium.

View Now

Treatment of Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia: A Retrospective Chart Review

Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia (CCCA) is a highly debilitating form of scarring hair loss which primarily affects African American women. There is a lack of data regarding treatment options for patients with CCCA, and therefore, investigation of therapies and responses to these therapies is warranted.

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A Rare Case of Lipedematous Scalp in an African American Female

This case presents a 55-year old African American female referred to dermatology for an evaluation of hair loss predominantly at the vertex of a 2-year duration. She reported tenderness of the scalp but denied pruritus. Her exam showed a boggy, tender, non-scaly scalp with minimal perifollicular erythema at the vertex.

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Cysteamine- Towards A Novel First Line Treatment for Melasma?

Kligman’s formula, consisting of hydroquinone, retinoic acid and a corticosteroid remains to date the dermatologist’s treatment of choice for melasma. However, side effects and draw-backs such as ochronosis, skin atrophy, irritation, photosensitivity and post inflammatory hyperpigmentation are significant.

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Influences of therapeutic choices and treatment outcome in acne vulgaris among patients in South Nigeria

Acne Vulgaris (AV), a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin and hair follicles is one of the most common reasons to present to the dermatologist. In Nigeria, as with most parts of the world, patients will typically present when they have persistent or worsening lesions and following treatment trial with over the counter (OTC) medications and suggestions from concerned individuals.

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Learn more about this the 2020 SOCU conference here and register today!