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Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

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In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen.

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In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen.

Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl E Grimes MD, Stephen Lynch PhD, Kalli Ji PhD, Manisha Brahmachary PhD, Qian Zheng Md PhD, Charbel Bouez PhD, Janet Wangari-Talbot PhD

 

 

Visible light (400–700nm), which contributes to 45% of solar radiation, contributes to skin darkening and worsening of dyschromias, particularly in individuals with Fitzpatrick skin phototypes III and higher.

The pathogenesis of melasma is incompletely understood, which poses a challenge for disease management. Causative factors include genetics, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, cosmetics, pregnancy, hormonal therapy, phototoxic drugs, and various medications.

Currently, sunscreens provide limited protection against that spectrum. Due to their capabilities in absorbing, scattering, and reflecting visible light, topical products containing pigments and/or metal oxides can provide additional photoprotection.

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Expert grading and colorimetry demonstrated that the iron-oxide containing formulations significantly protected against visible light-induced pigmentation compared to untreated skin or mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen in Fitzpatrick IV individuals.

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Articles are reviewed by the Editorial Board of renowned experts, from key opinion leaders to well-known clinicians. View our open-access dermatology articles now.
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Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Photoprotection, Skin of Color | No Comments
In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

| Aesthetics, CME Activities, Featured Articles | No Comments
Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…

View the Latest Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology Articles Now

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JDD Highlights

The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.
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Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology

The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Article Highlights

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Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

The Science of Sun Protection

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Episode 1 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often…

Hispanic Tattoo Artists Could Provide Skin Cancer Prevention via Aftercare Instructions and Social Media

By Podcast Highlights, Skin of Color No Comments

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JDD Podcast

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"Hispanic Tattoo Artists Could Provide Skin Cancer Prevention via Aftercare Instructions and Social Media."

featuring Dr. Adam Friedman, Dr. Robert P. Dellavalle, Dr. Cristian D. Gonzalez

Continued efforts by the dermatology community to educate the public on both photoprotective measures and early skin cancer detection through surveillance has made a significant impact but the battle is far from over, especially in diverse skin phototypes for whom myths and misinformation are still pervasive regarding this space.

Innovative strategies are still sorely needed! Enter mentor-mentee duo Robert P. Dellavalle MD PhD MSPH from the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Cristian D. Gonzalez MD from University of Texas Southwestern, who are no doubt going to create some buzz with their December 2019 JDD study “Hispanic Tattoo Artists Could Provide Skin Cancer Prevention via Aftercare Instructions and Social Media.”

Tune in to hear how both doctors and artists can become allies in canvas (aka skin) cancer education dissemination. Learn how social media can be used as an effective research tool to both recruit and collect data. By the time you are through with this custom work, you will be loyal to the coil.

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CME Available

Upon completion of this enduring activity, participants should be able to

  • discuss gaps in Hispanic tattoo artists’ understanding of skin cancer and willingness to disseminate sun protection information
  • identify opportunities to improve sun safety practices in at risk populations
  • and utilize social media as an emerging population health research tool.
Haven’t listened to this podcast? Listen to it here.
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The Science of Sun Protection

| Podcast | No Comments
Episode 1 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often…

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Photoprotection, Skin of Color | No Comments
In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

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Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with substantial baggage adding to this proclamation with skin, hair, and nail adverse…

Capturing Consensus and Cutting Out Misconceptions Regarding the Aesthetic Skin of Color Consumer

By Podcast Highlights, Skin of Color No Comments

JDD Multimedia

JDD Podcast

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"Capturing Consensus and Cutting Out Misconceptions Regarding the Aesthetic Skin of Color Consumer"

featuring Dr. Adam Friedman & Dr. Andrew Alexis
Who knows what’s best/worst for facial aesthetics in the skin of color patient? No really who? Because there is a great deal of folklore and ballyhoo related to what one can and cannot do, forgetting even what the patients think.
Enter Dr. Andrew Alexis, Professor and Chair of the Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West and Director of the Skin of Color Center, with his experienced SOC entourage to marry personal experience and evidence (what a beautiful couple!).

Tune in to hear how it all went down. You couldn’t be in the room where it happened, but after this podcast you might have well been. Learn from one of the greats as I pick his brain on all things, medical and aesthetic, SOC. C to it you don’t miss this podcast.

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CME Available
Upon completion of this enduring activity, participants should be able to:
  • Discuss common myths and mis-perceptions with respect to aesthetics and skin of color patients
  • Review unique considerations in order to optimize the management of skin disease in diverse skin types
Take CME Now

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NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman   Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with…

Systemic Antibiotics in the Management of Acne: Issues and Considerations for Optimal Care

| Acne, Podcast Highlights | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Joslyn Kirby and Adam Friedman   WEEEEEEERE BACK! Join host Dr. Adam Friedman for lively and learned discussion with Dr. Joslyn Kirby on one of the…

An Advanced, Physician-Strength Retinol Peel Improves Signs of Aging and Acne Across a Range of Skin Types Including Melasma and Skin of Color

By Skin of Color No Comments

Dermatology News

Featured Article

As a complementary procedure to hydroquinone homecare products, patients have used chemical peels to improve hyperpigmentation or melasma.3 While chemical peels are considered safe for all skin types, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation can be a concern of higher strength chemical peels, particularly in those with darker skin.2

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An Advanced, Physician-Strength Retinol Peel Improves Signs of Aging and Acne Across a Range of Skin Types Including Melasma and Skin of Color

A clinical study was conducted to evaluate the tolerability, safety, and efficacy of the 3% retinol peel with a supportive homecare regimen across a range of peel candidates, females aged 18-65 years, with photodamage, acne, hyperpigmentation or melasma, and skin of color, over a series of 2-4 peels.

Physician-strength chemical peels are consistently the third most common cosmetic procedure next to neurotoxin and soft-tissue filler injections.1 Superficial chemical peels are common and safe peeling procedures.2 Facial chemical peels are highly sought after by aging patients who desire improvements to fine lines and wrinkles, pigmentation, clarity, and laxity, as well as patients with acne, hyperpigmentation, or melasma.

As a complementary procedure to hydroquinone homecare products, patients have used chemical peels to improve hyperpigmentation or melasma.3 While chemical peels are considered safe for all skin types, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation can be a concern of higher strength chemical peels, particularly in those with darker skin.2

Retinol is a proven ingredient for the management of acne and is used as adjunctive care for photodamage due to its ability to enhance exfoliation, increase epidermal thickness, and reduce matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity (collagenase) while increasing collagen.4-7

Studies have demonstrated that topical prescription retinoids are safe and effective in patients with dark skin for the treatment of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation.8 Cosmetic retinol products have been shown to affect hyperpigmentation and provide a more even skin tone.5

An advanced, physician-strength superficial peel containing 3% retinol was developed to exfoliate and improve the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, plump and firm skin, and reduce hyperpigmentation while promoting a bright, even complexion.

Formulated with bisabolol to help calm the skin, and Vitamin E as an antioxidant, this peel provides additional benefits to overall skin appearance with the addition of triethyl citrate and acetyl tyrosinamide to enhance the skin’s matrix for plumping and firming effects.9-11

A single center, prospective clinical study evaluated the tolerability and effectiveness of a series of cosmetic retinol peels, in conjunction with a homecare regimen, to improve the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, skin firmness, and overall complexion brightness on subjects with mild to moderate photodamage across a range of peel candidates, including those with moderate acne, hyperpigmentation or melasma, and skin of color.

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JDD Article Referenced in this Post

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Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Photoprotection, Skin of Color | No Comments
In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

| Aesthetics, CME Activities, Featured Articles | No Comments
Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…

Q-Switched 1064 nm Nd:YAG Laser in Treating Axillary Hyperpigmentation in Filipino Women With Skin Types IV-V

By Skin of Color No Comments

Dermatology News

Featured Article

Post inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) is an acquired hyper-melanosis typically arising following inflammatory lesions. It is one of the most common dermatologic complaints, which may develop in all skin types, however, higher prevalence is seen in patients with Fitzpatrick skin types IV-VI.

Credit: Duangjan – stock.adobe.com Copyright: ©Duangjan – stock.adobe.com

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Q-Switched 1064 nm Nd:YAG Laser in Treating Axillary Hyperpigmentation in Filipino Women With Skin Types IV-V

Use of a low-fluence 1064 nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of axillary hyperpigmentation is safe and effective in patients with darker skin type.

Post inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) is an acquired hyper-melanosis typically arising following inflammatory lesions. It is one of the most common dermatologic complaints, which may develop in all skin types, however, higher prevalence is seen in patients with Fitzpatrick skin types IV-VI.

The etiology underlying PIH can either be an exogenous source (allergy, irritation, contact dermatitis, dermabrasion, laser therapy or burns), an endogenous factor (primary inflammatory or bullous dermatosis) or even induced by an infectious agent such as herpes zoster virus infection. Morphologic pattern and degree of pigmentation vary depending on causative factors and melanin distribution in the epidermis, dermis or both.1,2,3

IH typically manifests as macules or patches in the same distribution in previous areas of inflammation, which can be classified as two clinical forms: epidermal and/or dermal. In epidermal PIH, melanocytes are activated, and release melanin resulting in tan brown or dark brown appearance and may take months to years to resolve. Dermal PIH includes activation of basal keratinocytes, which also release melanin, and present as dark brown to blue-grey discoloration that may either be permanent or resolve over an extended period of time if not treated.

Differentiating between the two is difficult, and PIH is probably a result of the combination of both epidermal and dermal lesions.4 The degree of PIH varies depending on the etiological factors, skin type or “chromatic tendency” as well as exposure to UV light, certain medications and cutaneous injuries (trauma or even shaving).1,2,5,6 The discoloration is determined by the distribution and depth of pigment within the skin layers.

The pathogenesis of PIH is often related to an increase in melanin synthesis and/or irregular pigment dispersion resulting from cutaneous inflammation. It is considered the end result of: melanocyte proliferation, melanin synthesis and increased activation of tyrosinase coupled with transfer of melanosomes to neighboring keratinocytes. Although the exact mechanism is not yet fully understood, the rise in melanocyte activity and proliferation has been known to be stimulated by inflammatory mediators such as reactive oxygen species, prostaglandins and leukotrienes.1,5

Axillary hyperpigmentation is a frequent dermatological complaint, characterized by dermal and epidermal PIH mainly associated with women of darker skin types. Etiological theory associates axillary hyperpigmentation of a form of post inflammatory hyperpigmentation due to continuous irritation due to hair removal, cleansing, tight cloths, or innate darkening from genetic related factors.11

The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the efficacy of a 1064nm nanosecond QS Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of axillary PIH in Filipino women with Fitzpatrick skin types IV-V.

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Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Photoprotection, Skin of Color | No Comments
In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

| Aesthetics, CME Activities, Featured Articles | No Comments
Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…