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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

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Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various mechanisms of action including direct anti-inflammatory, anti-pruritic, anti-oxidant, anti-fungal, pre-biotic, barrier repair properties, and beneficial effects on skin pH. These have been shown to be of particular benefit in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

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Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various mechanisms of action including direct anti-inflammatory, anti-pruritic, anti-oxidant, anti-fungal, pre-biotic, barrier repair properties, and beneficial effects on skin pH. These have been shown to be of particular benefit in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

Blair Allais MD, Adam Friedman MD FAAD

 

 

Oatmeal has a longstanding and rich history pertaining to its dermatologic use. The first documentation of oatmeal for skin health dates back as early as 2000 BC in Arabia and Egypt, where it was described as soothing and protecting in dry or itchy, inflamed skin. Oatmeal flour was subsequently recognized as a topical therapy for a variety of dermatologic conditions in Roman medical literature. The first scientific studies on the skin benefits of oatmeal appeared in the 1930s, including information about the cleansing properties of oatmeal, its role in relieving itch, and its function as a skin protectant.

In the 1940s and 1950s colloidal oatmeal became commercially available both in powder form and mixed with emollient oils, instigating medical studies examining the benefits of colloi-dal oatmeal baths in various xerotic dermatoses.

The results of this open-label clinical study suggest that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

In 1989, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved colloidal oatmeal as a safe and effective over-the-counter drug. In 2003, the FDA noted that colloidal oatmeal could relieve irritation and itching due to a number of dermatoses, providing temporary skin protection.5 Colloidal oatmeal is one of the few products that the FDA recognizes as a safe over the counter treatment. Today it is available in various forms including creams, lotions, shampoos, shaving gels, bath treat-ments, and body wash.

Colloidal oatmeal is the powder obtained from the grinding and processing of whole oat grain. Under strict protocols es-tablished by the US Pharmacopeia, oat grain is ground and processed until no more than 3% of the total particles in the powder exceed 150 μm in size and no more than 20% exceed 75 μm in size.6 The small size of the particles contributes to their ability to deposit on the skin and form an occlusive barrier when dispersed in water. Oat is composed of various types of phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. Col-loidal oatmeal consists of sugars and amino acids (65%), proteins (15–20%), lipids (11%), and fiber (5%).7 The most important groups of phytochemicals present in oats include phenolics, β-glucans, lignans, avenanthramides, carotenoids, vitamin E, and phytosterols.

Of the phenolics present in oats, ferulic acid and caffeic acid are strong antioxidants, and fe-rulic acid also has UV absorbing properties.8 Flavonoids, a group of phenolic compounds present in oat, also are capable of absorbing ultraviolet A light from 320–370 nm. β-glucans are polysaccharides of D-glucose monomers and have a high viscosity largely due to their β-(1–3)-linkages.This viscosity contributes to the water-binding properties of oat. Oats also contain a wide range of minerals and vitamins, of which vita-min E is the most clinically relevant. Vitamin E is a naturally occurring antioxidant that protects against oxidative stress, inflammation, and photo-induced aging.

Learn more about the history, basic science, mechanism of Action, and clinical efficacy of colloidal oatmeal in the treatment of Atopic Dermatitis now.

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November 16, 2020

Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

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November 10, 2020

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November 6, 2020

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2019 Scientific Poster Abstracts from Skin of Color Update

By Derm Community

Education Credits

September 12: 8.5 | September 13 = 4.5

Category 1
Creighton University Health Sciences Continuing Education designates this live activity for a maximum of 13 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) TM. Physicians should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

AAPA accepts AMA category 1 credit for the PRA from organizations accredited by ACCME

Nurse CE
Creighton University Health Sciences Continuing Education designates this activity for 13 contact hours for nurses.  Nurses should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

View a selection of scientific poster abstracts from the 2019 Skin of Color Update below.

SOCU is the largest CE event dedicated to trending evidence-based research and new practical pearls for treating skin types III – VI, will be held  held September 12 – 13 at the Sheraton Times Square in New York City.

Each year, SOCU presents exclusive content and learning opportunities on topics including,  Acne, Rosacea, Psoriasis, Scalp Psoriasis, Skin Cancer, Atopic Dermatitis, Hidradenitis Suppurativa, Nail and Fungal Disorders, and how they affect the patient of color.

 

Impact of High Coverage Make-up Coverage against Visible Light Exposure

Historically, photo-protection studies have focused on UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm) protection. However, it is now evident that visible light (400-700 nm) causes skin darkening and contribute to worsening of dyschromia, particularly in individuals with Fitzpatrick phototype III and higher.

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Twenty Nail Dystrophy; a case report from DISHARC, Nepal

Twenty-nail dystrophy (TND) is rare and less reported chronic inflammatory disorder affecting nail matrix of all twenty nails. Literature reports mainly as idiopathic but are also associated with cutaneous or systemic disorders among childhood. It clinically presents as rough, thin, brittle lustureless nails with multiple pits. The diagnosis was made clinically but pathological study shows spongiosis and exocytosis of inflammatory cells in epithelium.

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Treatment of Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia: A Retrospective Chart Review

Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia (CCCA) is a highly debilitating form of scarring hair loss which primarily affects African American women. There is a lack of data regarding treatment options for patients with CCCA, and therefore, investigation of therapies and responses to these therapies is warranted.

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A Rare Case of Lipedematous Scalp in an African American Female

This case presents a 55-year old African American female referred to dermatology for an evaluation of hair loss predominantly at the vertex of a 2-year duration. She reported tenderness of the scalp but denied pruritus. Her exam showed a boggy, tender, non-scaly scalp with minimal perifollicular erythema at the vertex.

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Cysteamine- Towards A Novel First Line Treatment for Melasma?

Kligman’s formula, consisting of hydroquinone, retinoic acid and a corticosteroid remains to date the dermatologist’s treatment of choice for melasma. However, side effects and draw-backs such as ochronosis, skin atrophy, irritation, photosensitivity and post inflammatory hyperpigmentation are significant.

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Influences of therapeutic choices and treatment outcome in acne vulgaris among patients in South Nigeria

Acne Vulgaris (AV), a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin and hair follicles is one of the most common reasons to present to the dermatologist. In Nigeria, as with most parts of the world, patients will typically present when they have persistent or worsening lesions and following treatment trial with over the counter (OTC) medications and suggestions from concerned individuals.

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Learn more about this the 2020 SOCU conference here and register today!