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Sign Up To Attend Free ODAC Virtual Workshops

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Dermatology Events

Events

Sign up now to attend Free ODAC Virtual 2021 Workshops

Sign up now to attend Free ODAC Virtual 2021 Workshops

The virtual ODAC conference, taking place January 14 – 17, 2021 is offering free workshops throughout the week.

Dermatologists do not need to be registered to attend ODAC to join the workshops, however, to attend, you must preregister for each session. View the workshop agenda below to save your spot.

To view the entire ODAC Conference agenda, click here.

  • In His Own Words: One Patient’s Journey with Dr. Alvaro Moreira

  • Wednesday, January 13th 7:00 PM ET
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  • FDA Approved Label Expansion. Progress Your Topical Patients to the Next Step: An Oral Treatment With Data for Moderate to Severe Scalp Psoriasis with Lawrence Green, MD

  • Thursday, January 14th 7:15 PM ET
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  •  ARAZLO™ Lotion: Tazarotene Redefined with Leon Kircik, MD

  • Friday, January 15th 12:00 PM ET
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  • Behind the Brand – The DNA of La Roche-Posay with Adam Friedman, MD

  • Friday, January 15th 3:15 PM ET
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  • Pathophysiology of Atopic Dermatitis with Marc Serota, MD, FAAD

  • Saturday, January 16th 12:00 PM ET
Sign Up Now

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Recommendations for Preparing a Disaster Response Plan

| Aesthetics, COVID 19, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
In a paper recently published by JDD, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year. In a paper recently published by…
Dermatologist looking at skin

What’s New in Dermatology – January 2021

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care…

Top 10 Most Talked About Articles of 2020

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD.…

Recommendations for Preparing a Disaster Response Plan

By Aesthetics, COVID 19, Featured Articles, The Latest No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

In a paper recently published by JDD, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year.

In a paper recently published by JDD, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year.

Heather Onorati

The  suddenness with which offices closed as the COVID-19 pandemic escalated created many questions for practices. The uncertainty and inconsistencies around staffing procedures and reopening protocols added to the anxiety and emphasized the need to have proactive strategies in place for emergency situations.

In a paper recently published by JDD, Aesthetic Office Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year.

“This advisory guide is meant to provide aesthetic physicians and their staff with a practical approach for practice management, staffing, supplies and inventory, and patient management,” the authors write in their paper titled “Aesthetic Office Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan.” They add that the paper does not set a standard of practice, but rather offers recommendations for various office procedures to have in place before a disaster-related event.

The experts classified their recommendations into four general areas: Practice Management; Supplies and Inventory; Office Staffing Considerations and Protocols; and Patient Management Strategies.

Among their many recommendations, they suggest creating several lists to serve as references in the event of an emergency. These include:

  • Site access lists — log-in information and passwords to social media sites and other web-based office accounts
  • Contact lists — staff contact details; office insurance policy contacts; financial institutions; colleagues who can be reached for assistance or guidance; state and national agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Federal emergency Management Agency, Department of Public Health), Department of Labor, etc.
  • Supply lists — office-related items in staff possession, inventory of general medical supplies including quantities and expiration dates

Additionally, the authors suggest pre-planning protocols for emergency staffing and office-hours as well as methods for communicating these to both staff and patients at the onset of a disaster.

“In situations of office closure or limited patient accessibility, the staff should be prepared to quickly switch to virtual access patient management tools such as telemedicine appointments,” the authors write.

Among their many additional suggestions, the authors offer insight into financial considerations, office medical record policies and procedures, how much to stock of various emergency supplies and more.

“We are hopeful that this provides at least a template of items for consideration and implementation across the various practice situations and emergencies and mitigates the reoccurrence of difficult lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic,” they write.

Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.
Articles Cited in this Post

 

Aesthetic Office Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan

The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has served as a call-to-arms in preparing practices for the next disaster whether it is another infectious disease or a flood, hurricane, earthquake, a sustained power outage, or something else. A group of predominantly core aesthetic physicians discussed the various aspects of their office procedures that warrant consideration in a proactive approach to the next pandemic/disaster-related event. This guide does not set a standard of practice but contains recommendations that may avoid some of the “lessons learned” with the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Recommendations for Preparing a Disaster Response Plan

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In a paper recently published by JDD, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year. In a paper recently published by…
Dermatologist looking at skin

What’s New in Dermatology – January 2021

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care…

Top 10 Most Talked About Articles of 2020

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD.…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

By Aesthetics, Featured Articles No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

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A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (“Efficacy and Tolerability of a Skin Brightening/Anti-Aging Cosmeceutical Containing Retinol 0.5%, Niacinamide, Hexylresorcinol, and Resveratrol“), which was recently cited in an article on Prevention.com, suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection. 

Patricia Farris MD, Joshua Zeichner MD, and Diane Berson MD

 

Consumers are increasingly interested in over-the-counter skin care products that can improve the appearance of photodamaged and aging skin. This 10-week, open-label, single- center study enrolled 25 subjects with mild to moderate hyperpigmentation and other clinical stigmata of cutaneous aging including fine lines, sallowness, lack of clarity, and wrinkling. Their mean age was 53.4±7.7 years. The test product contained retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide 4.4%, resveratrol 1%, and hexylresorcinol 1.1% in a moisturizing base. Subjects were provided a skin care regimen including a cleanser, hydrating serum, moisturizer, and an SPF 30 sunscreen for daily use. The test product was applied only at night.

The use of this skin brightening/anti-aging cosmeceutical was found to provide statistically significant improvements in all efficacy endpoints by study end. Fine lines, radiance, and smoothness were significantly improved as early as week 2 (P<.001). By week 4, hyperpigmentation, overall skin clarity, evenness of skin tone, and wrinkles showed statistically significant improvement compared to baseline. Mild retinoid dermatitis including flaking and redness occurred early in the study as reflected by tolerability scores. By week 10, subjects reported no stinging, itching, dryness, or tingling.

The results of this open-label clinical study suggest that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

Read Full Article Now
Article Cited in this Post

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Recommendations for Preparing a Disaster Response Plan

| Aesthetics, COVID 19, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
In a paper recently published by JDD, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year. In a paper recently published by…
Dermatologist looking at skin

What’s New in Dermatology – January 2021

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care…

Top 10 Most Talked About Articles of 2020

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD.…

Biological Effects of Hyaluronic Acid-Based Dermal Fillers and Laser Therapy on Human Skin Models

By Aesthetics, Features No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

This study investigates the molecular effects of different stabilized HA and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-based fillers with and without subsequent additional fractional laser co-treatment.

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This study investigates the molecular effects of different stabilized HA and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-based fillers with and without subsequent additional fractional laser co-treatment.

Laura Huth PhD, Yvonne Marquardt, Ruth Heise PhD, Katharina Fietkau, Jens Malte Baron MD, Sebastian Huth PhD

 

Injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal fillers is one of the most frequently performed aesthetic procedures. HA fillers exist in many different formulations differing in HA concentration, particle size and cross-linking density.

While HA fillers with high-density and large particles are recommended for deep dermal injections, fillers with low-density and small particles are more commonly used for fine lines.

The direct biological effects of dermal fillers monotherapy and combination therapy with ablative fractional CO2- or Er:YAG laser irradiation on human skin cells are not completely understood. Organotypic three-dimensional (3D) skin equivalents have been established for standardized studies of the human skin.

The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular effects of different stabilized HA and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-based fillers with and without subsequent additional fractional laser co-treatment.

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Article Cited in this Post

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Recommendations for Preparing a Disaster Response Plan

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In a paper recently published by JDD, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year. In a paper recently published by…
Dermatologist looking at skin

What’s New in Dermatology – January 2021

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care…

Top 10 Most Talked About Articles of 2020

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As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD.…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

By Aesthetics, Featured Articles, New Articles No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin.

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Improvements in skin health is a well-researched benefit of taking collagen – in fact, according to a January 2019 Journal of Drugs in Dermatology study, (recently featured in an Every Day Health article, ” 8 Potential Benefits of Collagen – and 1 Thing it Can’t Do”), 800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin.

Franchesca D. Choi BS RPh, Calvin T. Sung BS, Margit L.W. Juhasz MD, Natasha Atanaskova Mesinkovska MD PhD

Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been rising.

In 2016, the collagen market was valued at an estimated 3.71 billion USD and is projected to reach 6.63 billion USD by 2025. Collagen supplements, originating from various sources (eg, porcine, bovine, marine) and available in numerous formulations (eg, protein, gelatin, hydrolysate, peptides), are marketed as improving skin integrity and modulating skin aging.

However, even with this increase in patient interest and market share, the use of collagen supplementation in dermatology remains controversial due to the lack of regulation on quality and quantity of ingredients in over-the-counter collagen supplements, as well as minimal peer-reviewed literature on the subject. Fortunately, there are increasing numbers of clinical studies regarding potential effects of collagen-based dietary supplements on skin.

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Recommendations for Preparing a Disaster Response Plan

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In a paper recently published by JDD, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year. In a paper recently published by…
Dermatologist looking at skin

What’s New in Dermatology – January 2021

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care…

Top 10 Most Talked About Articles of 2020

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD.…

View the Latest Discoveries in Aesthetics, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

By Featured Articles, JDD Highlights No Comments

Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

September JDD

The September issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on aesthetic treatments, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Read the September JDD Now

Aesthetics, Public Health, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

The September issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on aesthetic treatments, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Article Highlights

 

Editor's Picks

 

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Insights On the Pediatric, Adolescent & Adult AD Patient

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Recommendations for Preparing a Disaster Response Plan

| Aesthetics, COVID 19, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
In a paper recently published by JDD, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year. In a paper recently published by…
Dermatologist looking at skin

What’s New in Dermatology – January 2021

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care…

Systemic Antibiotics in the Management of Acne: Issues and Considerations for Optimal Care

By Acne, Podcast Highlights No Comments

JDD Multimedia

JDD Podcast

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"Systemic Antibiotics in the Management of Acne: Issues and Considerations for Optimal Care"

Drs. Joslyn Kirby and Adam Friedman

 

WEEEEEEERE BACK! Join host Dr. Adam Friedman for lively and learned discussion with Dr. Joslyn Kirby on one of the most common, chronic, soul-crushing complaints… Acne Vulgaris. It is, from a pathophysiological standpoint, a biological sh*t show, but you need to understand it to develop the best treatment plans. We talk inflammation, first line approaches, setting patient expectations and compliance. We dive deep into the differences between broad-spectrum and narrow-spectrum antibiotics, when to use them, and for how long. (Spoiler alert: NOT TOO LONG!). In our efforts to be stewards of meaningful antibiotic use and adversaries of antimicrobial resistance, narrow-spectrum antibiotics are the future!

This enduring activity is supported by an independent medical education grant provided by Almirall, LLC.

Upon completion of this enduring, internet-based educational activity, participants should be able to:

  • Review current scientific understanding of pathophysiology of acne
  • Summarize acne treatment strategies utilizing systemic antibiotics
  • Differentiate safety and efficacy of broad and narrow spectrum antibiotics indicated for acne treatment
  • Cite the benefits of narrow spectrum antibiotic use in acne therapy
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Disclosures:
  • Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD – Grant/Research: Aclaris, CPN, Almirall. Consultant: SanovaWorks, Oakstone Institute, L’oreal, La Roche Posay, Galderma, Aveeno, Valeant, Microcures, Biogen, Pfizer, G&W Laboratories, Novartis, Occulus, Intraderm, Encore, Exeltis, Menlo, Lilly, Aclaris, Dermira, Berg, Allergan, Zylo Therapeutics, Hoth. Speaker’s Bureau: Regeneron, Dermira, Janssen, AbbVie. Major Stock Shareholder: Zylo, Minorcures.
  • Joslyn R. Sciacca Kirby, MD – No relevant disclosures.

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Insights On the Pediatric, Adolescent & Adult AD Patient

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New Developments in Tetracycline-Class Antibiotics

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iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Christopher Bunick & Dr. Adam Friedman   Tetracycline antibiotics are like the Snickers of dermatology. Instead of "Hungry? Grab a Snickers," "Acne? Grab a…

Current Understanding of the Pathophysiology, Etiology, Prevalence & Burden of AD

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The Latest Research & Discoveries in Psoriasis, Anti-Aging, Aesthetics, and Medical Dermatology

By JDD Highlights No Comments

Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

The August issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Psoriasis, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Read the JDD Now

Psoriasis, Public Health, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology

The August issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on  psoriasis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

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Events
January 13, 2021

Sign Up To Attend Free ODAC Virtual Workshops

Sign up now to attend Free ODAC Virtual 2021 Workshops Sign up now to attend Free ODAC Virtual 2021 Workshops The virtual ODAC conference, taking place January 14 – 17,…
Atopic DermatitisPodcast Highlights
January 11, 2021

Insights On the Pediatric, Adolescent & Adult AD Patient

iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Peter Lio, Dr. Lindsay Finklea & Dr. Adam Friedman   You can't truly understand someone until you walk a mile in their shoes. This…
Podcast
January 8, 2021

Insights On the Pediatric, Adolescent & Adult AD Patient

You can't truly understand someone until you walk a mile in their shoes. This is true to so many aspects of daily life, especially when it comes to chronic, relapsing,…

View the Latest Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology Articles Now

By JDD Highlights, Skin of Color No Comments

Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.
Read the JDD Now

Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology

The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Article Highlights

Editor's Picks

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Sign Up To Attend Free ODAC Virtual Workshops

| Events | No Comments
Sign up now to attend Free ODAC Virtual 2021 Workshops Sign up now to attend Free ODAC Virtual 2021 Workshops The virtual ODAC conference, taking place January 14 – 17,…

Insights On the Pediatric, Adolescent & Adult AD Patient

| Atopic Dermatitis, Podcast Highlights | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Peter Lio, Dr. Lindsay Finklea & Dr. Adam Friedman   You can't truly understand someone until you walk a mile in their shoes. This…

Insights On the Pediatric, Adolescent & Adult AD Patient

| Podcast | No Comments
You can't truly understand someone until you walk a mile in their shoes. This is true to so many aspects of daily life, especially when it comes to chronic, relapsing,…

An Analysis of Skin of Color Dermatology Related Content on Instagram

By Aesthetics, Skin of Color No Comments

Skin of Color Update

Featured Article

Patients are utilizing internet resources and social media to learn of dermatologic conditions and possible treatments. However, no studies about skin of color dermatology content available on different social media platforms have been done.

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An Analysis of Skin of Color Dermatology Related Content on Instagram

Taylor M Wells BS, Chandler W Rundle MD, Mindy D Szeto BS, Colby Presley , Robert P Dellavalle MD PhD MSPH

 

The population of the United States is becoming increasingly more diverse. The most recent US census showed that while non-Hispanic whites currently make up the majority of the population at 198 million, they remain the only segment of the US population in which deaths outpace the number of births. At the same time, other racial and ethnic groups are experiencing population growth.1 In fact, it is projected that by 2050, over half the US population will be individuals of color.

The lack of dermatologists of color combined with the small percent of dermatologic education dedicated to patients with skin of color3 has created racial disparity in the delivery of care to patients of color. Gorbatenko-Roth et al has confirmed that patients of color are concerned that race-discordant dermatologists do not have specific knowledge of their skin and hair conditions and/ or routine skin and hair care regimens. Additionally, there is concern that these dermatologists do not offer individualized treatments for their disorders.2

Initiatives such as the Diversity Champion Initiative of the AAD’s Diversity Task Force, aimed at diversifying dermatology and increasing exposure to skin of color dermatology during training, have been implemented but these changes are systemic and slower to take effect.4

In the interim, patients are utilizing internet resources and social media to learn of dermatologic conditions and possible treatments. However, no studies about skin of color dermatology content available on different social media platforms have been done. Here, we sought to explore Instagram to identify skin of color-related dermatology content being posted, characterize the generators of this content, and compare the characteristics of content generated by board certified dermatologists with other Instagram users.

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Article Cited in this Post

Skin of Color Update Virtual

The Experts’ Forum for Multicultural Dermatology

The US population is growing and evolving and the clinical profile of the average patient presenting to the dermatologist is changing. One in three Americans self-identify as member of a non-caucasian racial or ethnic group. Data shows as of 2020, individuals of non-Caucasian, multi-racial descent will comprise more than 50% of the population.

Skin of Color Update Virtual 2020 Topics

 

  • Hair Loss
  • Acne
  • Rosacea
  • Skin Care with Cosmeceuticals
  • PRP
  • Psoriasis
  • Scalp Psoriasis
  • Skin Cancer
  • and more!
Register for SOCU 2020 Now

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Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Photoprotection, Skin of Color | No Comments
In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…

View the Latest Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology Articles Now

| JDD Highlights, Skin of Color | No Comments
The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.…

An Analysis of Skin of Color Dermatology Related Content on Instagram

| Aesthetics, Skin of Color | No Comments
Patients are utilizing internet resources and social media to learn of dermatologic conditions and possible treatments. However, no studies about skin of color dermatology content available on different social media…

Acne, OCPs, and a Side Order of Practical Pearls for the Adolescent Patient

By Acne, Podcast Highlights No Comments

JDD Multimedia

JDD Podcast

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"Acne, OCPs, and a Side Order of Practical Pearls for the Adolescent Patient"

Dr. Adam Friedman and Dr. Lawrence Eichenfield

JDD Podcast host Dr. Adam Friedman gets first-hand insight from internationally acclaimed pediatric dermatologist Dr. Lawrence Eichenfield on his recent study entitled “Hormonal Contraceptives and Acne: A Retrospective Analysis of 2147 Patients” published in the June 2016 edition of the Journal of Drugs of Dermatology.

Want a refresher on the use of OCPs in Acne? Interested in learning how to initiate a patient based survey study? Just curious how a leader in the field gets an uninterested adolescent to be compliant and engaged in his/her acne care? These are just a few of the practical pearls provided.

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Article Cited in this Post
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Insights On the Pediatric, Adolescent & Adult AD Patient

| Atopic Dermatitis, Podcast Highlights | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Peter Lio, Dr. Lindsay Finklea & Dr. Adam Friedman   You can't truly understand someone until you walk a mile in their shoes. This…

New Developments in Tetracycline-Class Antibiotics

| Podcast Highlights | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Christopher Bunick & Dr. Adam Friedman   Tetracycline antibiotics are like the Snickers of dermatology. Instead of "Hungry? Grab a Snickers," "Acne? Grab a…

Current Understanding of the Pathophysiology, Etiology, Prevalence & Burden of AD

| Podcast Highlights | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Peter Lio and Dr. Adam Friedman   In part 2 of this 5 part podcast homage to Atopic Dermatitis, JDD Podcast host Dr. Adam…

Impact of High Coverage Make-up Coverage against Visible Light Exposure

By Aesthetics, Skin of Color No Comments

Skin of Color Update

Featured Poster Abstract

The following is a selected scientific poster abstract from the 2019 Skin of Color Update.

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"Impact of High Coverage Make-up Coverage against Visible Light Exposure"

Authors: Hawasatu Dumbuya, PhD & Janet Wangari-Talbot, PhD

The following is a selected scientific poster abstract from the 2019 Skin of Color Update.

Historically, photo-protection studies have focused on UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm) protection. However, it is now evident that visible light (400-700 nm) causes skin darkening and contribute to worsening of dyschromia, particularly in individuals with Fitzpatrick phototype III and higher.

Currently, few sunscreens provide protection against visible light. Due to their capabilities in absorbing and reflecting visible light, topical products containing pigments and/or metal oxides (i.e. iron oxide, zinc oxide, and titanium dioxide), can provide additional protection against harmful effects of that spectrum.

Here, we demonstrate that lightly or darkly tinted high coverage pigmented foundation containing iron oxides or a combination of iron oxide and titanium dioxide significantly protected against visible light-induced pigmentation when compared to a mineral SPF50+ sunscreen in Fitzpatrick IV individuals when assessed by visual grading and by chromameter.

Our results show the benefits of high coverage pigmented foundation, containing different concentrations of iron oxide and titanium dioxide, in offering visible light photoprotection. Depending on the metal oxides concentrations, these formulations have the potential to extend protection beyond UV for multiple skin phototypes.

Skin of Color Scientific Poster Abstracts

View a curated selection of scientific poster abstracts from the Skin of Color Update conference below.

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Skin of Color Update Virtual

The Experts’ Forum for Multicultural Dermatology

The US population is growing and evolving and the clinical profile of the average patient presenting to the dermatologist is changing. One in three Americans self-identify as member of a non-caucasian racial or ethnic group. Data shows as of 2020, individuals of non-Caucasian, multi-racial descent will comprise more than 50% of the population.

Skin of Color Update Virtual 2020 Topics

 

  • Hair Loss
  • Acne
  • Rosacea
  • Skin Care with Cosmeceuticals
  • PRP
  • Psoriasis
  • Scalp Psoriasis
  • Skin Cancer
  • and more!
Register for SOCU 2020 Now

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Sign Up To Attend Free ODAC Virtual Workshops

| Events | No Comments
Sign up now to attend Free ODAC Virtual 2021 Workshops Sign up now to attend Free ODAC Virtual 2021 Workshops The virtual ODAC conference, taking place January 14 – 17,…

Insights On the Pediatric, Adolescent & Adult AD Patient

| Atopic Dermatitis, Podcast Highlights | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Peter Lio, Dr. Lindsay Finklea & Dr. Adam Friedman   You can't truly understand someone until you walk a mile in their shoes. This…

Insights On the Pediatric, Adolescent & Adult AD Patient

| Podcast | No Comments
You can't truly understand someone until you walk a mile in their shoes. This is true to so many aspects of daily life, especially when it comes to chronic, relapsing,…