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Sign Up To Attend Free ODAC Virtual Workshops

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Sign up now to attend Free ODAC Virtual 2021 Workshops

Sign up now to attend Free ODAC Virtual 2021 Workshops

The virtual ODAC conference, taking place January 14 – 17, 2021 is offering free workshops throughout the week.

Dermatologists do not need to be registered to attend ODAC to join the workshops, however, to attend, you must preregister for each session. View the workshop agenda below to save your spot.

To view the entire ODAC Conference agenda, click here.

  • In His Own Words: One Patient’s Journey with Dr. Alvaro Moreira

  • Wednesday, January 13th 7:00 PM ET
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  • FDA Approved Label Expansion. Progress Your Topical Patients to the Next Step: An Oral Treatment With Data for Moderate to Severe Scalp Psoriasis with Lawrence Green, MD

  • Thursday, January 14th 7:15 PM ET
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  •  ARAZLO™ Lotion: Tazarotene Redefined with Leon Kircik, MD

  • Friday, January 15th 12:00 PM ET
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  • Behind the Brand – The DNA of La Roche-Posay with Adam Friedman, MD

  • Friday, January 15th 3:15 PM ET
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  • Pathophysiology of Atopic Dermatitis with Marc Serota, MD, FAAD

  • Saturday, January 16th 12:00 PM ET
Sign Up Now

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Insights On the Pediatric, Adolescent & Adult AD Patient

By Atopic Dermatitis, Podcast Highlights No Comments

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JDD Podcast

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Insights On the Pediatric, Adolescent & Adult AD Patient

Dr. Peter Lio, Dr. Lindsay Finklea & Dr. Adam Friedman

 

You can’t truly understand someone until you walk a mile in their shoes. This is true to so many aspects of daily life, especially when it comes to chronic, relapsing, relentless medical issues. Enter the poster child: Atopic Dermatitis (AD). This exceedingly common chronic inflammatory disease is unavoidable in practice, and to best manage/partner with the millions of patients out there, it is on us to view/appreciate this condition beyond the practitioner lens.

In this 3rd episode of a 5 part podcast series, host Dr. Adam Friedman is joined by Dr. Lindsey Finklea, a practicing dermatologist and parent/caregiver of a child with severe AD, and Dr. Peter Lio, podcast veteran and AD focused Derm extraordinaire, to discuss the issues affecting patient-family/patient-caregiver interactions and offer clinical pearls for effective management strategies to best assist the needs of parents, families and caregivers for patients with the AD.

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This podcast is supported by an independent medical education grant provided by Sanofi Genzyme Regeneron.
Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this podcast, learners should be able to:
  • Cite the unique clinical implications of atopic dermatitis specific to the pediatric, adolescent and adult AD patient; and
  • Recognize the impact of AD on the patient-family and patient-caregiver dynamic

Disclosures

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD – Grant/Research: Aclaris, CPN, Almirall. Consultant: SanovaWorks, Oakstone Institute, L’oreal, La Roche Posay, Galderma, Aveeno, Valeant, Microcures, Biogen, Pfizer, G&W Laboratories, Novartis, Occulus, Intraderm, Encore, Exeltis, Menlo, Lilly, Aclaris, Dermira, Berg, Allergan, Zylo Therapeutics, Hoth. Speakers’ Bureau: Regeneron, Dermira, Janssen, AbbVie. Major Stock Shareholder: Zylo, Minorcures.
Peter Lio, MD – Advisory Board: Altus Labs, Arbonne, Bodewell, Dermavant Sciences, DermTap, Inc., DermVeda, gpower, inc., IntraDerm Pharmaceuticals, Johnson & Johnson Consumer Products Company, Menlo Therapeutics, Micreos Human Health B.V., Modernizing Medicine, National Eczema Association, Realm Therapeutics, Regeneron, Sanofi US Services, Syncere Skin Systems, UCB, Verrica Pharmaceuticals Inc, YobeeCare Inc. Board of Directors: National Eczema Association. Consultant: AbbVie, Amyris, Inc., Burt’s Bees, Dermira, Eli Lilly and Company, Exeltis, Franklin BioScience, Kiniksa Pharmaceuticals, Ltd., L’Oreal USA Inc., LEO Laboratories Ltd (LEO Pharma), Odeza LLC, Theraplex, TopMD, Unilever. Investigator: AbbVie, AOBiome, LLC, La Fondation pour la Dermatite Atopique (Foundation for Atopic Dermatitis, National Eczema Association, Regeneron. Speaker: Galderma USA, La Roche-Posay Laboratorie Pharmaceutique, Pfizer Inc., Pierre Fabre Dermatologie, Regeneron. Stockholder: LearnHealth/LearnSkin, Medable, Modernizing Medicine. Royalties: Theraplex.
Lindsay Finklea, MD – No relevant disclosures.

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Recommendations for Preparing a Disaster Response Plan

By Aesthetics, COVID 19, Featured Articles, The Latest No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

In a paper recently published by JDD, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year.

In a paper recently published by JDD, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year.

Heather Onorati

The  suddenness with which offices closed as the COVID-19 pandemic escalated created many questions for practices. The uncertainty and inconsistencies around staffing procedures and reopening protocols added to the anxiety and emphasized the need to have proactive strategies in place for emergency situations.

In a paper recently published by JDD, Aesthetic Office Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year.

“This advisory guide is meant to provide aesthetic physicians and their staff with a practical approach for practice management, staffing, supplies and inventory, and patient management,” the authors write in their paper titled “Aesthetic Office Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan.” They add that the paper does not set a standard of practice, but rather offers recommendations for various office procedures to have in place before a disaster-related event.

The experts classified their recommendations into four general areas: Practice Management; Supplies and Inventory; Office Staffing Considerations and Protocols; and Patient Management Strategies.

Among their many recommendations, they suggest creating several lists to serve as references in the event of an emergency. These include:

  • Site access lists — log-in information and passwords to social media sites and other web-based office accounts
  • Contact lists — staff contact details; office insurance policy contacts; financial institutions; colleagues who can be reached for assistance or guidance; state and national agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Federal emergency Management Agency, Department of Public Health), Department of Labor, etc.
  • Supply lists — office-related items in staff possession, inventory of general medical supplies including quantities and expiration dates

Additionally, the authors suggest pre-planning protocols for emergency staffing and office-hours as well as methods for communicating these to both staff and patients at the onset of a disaster.

“In situations of office closure or limited patient accessibility, the staff should be prepared to quickly switch to virtual access patient management tools such as telemedicine appointments,” the authors write.

Among their many additional suggestions, the authors offer insight into financial considerations, office medical record policies and procedures, how much to stock of various emergency supplies and more.

“We are hopeful that this provides at least a template of items for consideration and implementation across the various practice situations and emergencies and mitigates the reoccurrence of difficult lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic,” they write.

Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.
Articles Cited in this Post

 

Aesthetic Office Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan

The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has served as a call-to-arms in preparing practices for the next disaster whether it is another infectious disease or a flood, hurricane, earthquake, a sustained power outage, or something else. A group of predominantly core aesthetic physicians discussed the various aspects of their office procedures that warrant consideration in a proactive approach to the next pandemic/disaster-related event. This guide does not set a standard of practice but contains recommendations that may avoid some of the “lessons learned” with the COVID-19 pandemic.
Read More

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What’s New in Dermatology – January 2021

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What’s New in Dermatology – January 2021

By Featured Articles, The Latest No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

Dermatologist looking at skin

In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care moving into the future. While in other articles, investigators share findings that aim to improve disease understanding and patient care.

In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care moving into the future. While in other articles, investigators share findings that aim to improve disease understanding and patient care.

 

Heather Onorati

January always represents new beginnings. It’s the time of year we tend to reflect on the past, extract insight from experience and look toward the future with new hope and understanding. It is with this in mind that our January issue couples articles based in foresight and advances.

Groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care moving into the future. While in other articles, investigators share findings that aim to improve disease understanding and patient care.

In Aesthetic Office Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan, authors look to their shared experiences to provide suggestions for a proactive approach to manage possible future disaster-related events that could affect aesthetic practice operations and financial viability. Leveraging Virtual Boot Camp to Alleviate First Year Dermatology Resident Anxiety illustrates compelling levels of anxiety among incoming first-year dermatology residents and suggests that formally addressing the tenets of the specialty at the onset of PGY-2 can strengthen the foundation and boost the confidence of trainees. And, in Prescribing Isotretinoin for Transgender Patients: A Call to Action and Recommendations, authors discuss how the field of dermatology must remain on the leading edge of patient safety and advocacy issues and remain compassionate and adaptable when facing new patient care issues.

In the spirit of advancing understanding, other articles look to build the knowledge well around therapeutic techniques and disease treatment. As we continue toward a better understanding COVID-19, New York and Brazilian researchers examine the cutaneous presentations that could be clues to diagnosis in Presentation and Management of Cutaneous Manifestations of COVID-19. In the article Aesthetic ONE21 Technique for Injecting IncobotulinumtoxinA into the Forehead: Initial Experience With 86 Patients, authors report safety and efficacy from a single-center, retrospective study. Researchers present a clinical evaluation of a drug-device combination product for the topical treatment of molluscum contagiosum in A Phase 2 Open-Label Study to Evaluate VP-102 for the Treatment of Molluscum Contagiosum.

In addition, experts examine the impact of psychosocial stress on skin health, investigate efficacy of a nutraceutical supplement for promoting hair growth, discuss recommendations for absorbable suspension sutures in nonsurgical facial rejuvenation, and much more.

Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.
January 2021 JDD 

 

Editorials

Original Articles

Case Reports

Supplements

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Featured Article

Featured Article

As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD. And, we look forward to continuing to play a role in highlighting the benefits of the most promising treatments for your patients in the New Year.  

As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD. And, we look forward to continuing to play a role in highlighting the benefits of the most promising treatments for your patients in the New Year.  

 

Heather Onorati

The second half of 2020 has seen the world still trying to navigate and overcome the COVID-19 pandemic, and the practice of dermatology has been no exception. However, while still an area of focus, dermatologists have been reading, sharing and discussing studies about a variety of other conditions and treatments relevant to their patients.  

In our year-end topten list, we’re sharing the case studies, reviews and investigations published by the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology that have been downloaded and read the most in the past 12 months.  

 

As the world sought to understand the emerging Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), or coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), many potential signs and symptoms were investigated in connection with the virus, leading dermatologists to also grapple with identifying potentially afflicted patients. In a case study published early in the pandemic, authors in Cairo, Egypt, looked at whether a reported case of a pityriasis rosea-like rash could be connected with COVID-19. 

While COVID-19 remains a topic of interest, other issues like the use of neutraceuticals, approaches to treating melasma and hyperpigmentation, countering hair loss, and calming dermatitis have drawn attention.   

Nutrition and supplementation are topics of interest across medicine for their potential roles in overall health and wellness, including skincare. A literature review published in early 2019 examined the benefits of collagen supplementation in skin healing and anti-aging. The authors reported on a total of 11 studies that included 805 patients being treated for a range of issues from decubitus ulcers to anti-aging. In their analysis, the authors noted that collagen supplementation appeared to be promising with potential improvements in elasticity, hydration and dermal collagen density; however not all supplements are created equal and patients should be counselled with regard to ingredients and expectations, they noted. Another study that explored the use of a neutraceutical supplement for the treatment of hair loss highlighted botanical ingredients that may mitigate triggers for hair loss and help to restore balance to the follicle.   

In line with patient interest in “natural” treatments, investigators examined the mechanism of action for observed dermatologic benefits of colloidal oatmeal and found that extracts of colloidal oatmeal decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro. 

 

“Clinical evaluations showed that the colloidal oatmeal skin protectant lotion significantly improved dryness, scaling and roughness as early as 1 day after use, and these improvements were maintained over the duration of the study with continued use of the lotion,” the authors wrote. 

Among the investigations into treatments for common but challenging conditions, authors from the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, reported on a case of chronic bilateral nasolabial fold seborrheic dermatitis. They hypothesized that Crisaborole 2% ointment, a PDE4 inhibitor would reduce the inflammation. After 2 treatments per week for 4 weeks, the investigators observed a notable reduction in scaling and erythema on the treatment site.  

Another commonly seen condition, xanthelasma palpebrae, can be a significant cosmetic concern for patients. In a case study published in 2016, researchers report on a case in which they used a hyfrecator for superficial tissue destruction resulting in excellent cosmetic results, the authors showed. 

Melasma and hyperpigmentation are among the challenging conditions dermatologists see. One study still garnering attention is an investigation into the benefit of Vitamin C plus iontophoresis. Investigators observed a mean 73% improvement in abnormal pigmentation after treatment combining Vitamin C with a full-face iontophoresis mask. A mean improvement of 15.7 on the Melasma Area and Severity Index was also noted.  

A review of 10 studies examining the efficacy of retinoids and azelaic acid for the treatment of acne and subsequent post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation in skin of color reported growing evidence that retinoids are well-tolerated and could be considered as first-line therapies to treat acne people with skin of color. In addition, azelaic acid may offer improvement in both acne and hyperpigmentation, the authors noted.  

Finally, a more recent review evaluated 35 randomized controlled trials of topical agents for the treatment of melasma found strong evidence for the recommendation of cysteamine, triple combination therapy, and tranexamic acid. 

As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD. And, we look forward to continuing to play a role in highlighting the benefits of the most promising treatments for your patients in the New Year. 

Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.
Read the top 10 most discussed articles in 2020: 

 

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Lesson from the Skin Microbiome in Innate Immunity, Skin Disease and COVID-19

By COVID 19, Translational Lecture Series No Comments

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JDD Translational Lecture Series

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Lesson from the Skin Microbiome in Innate Immunity, Skin Disease and COVID-19

Lesson from the Skin Microbiome in Innate Immunity, Skin Disease and COVID-19

Richard Gallo, MD, PhD

 

This ongoing evidence-based series from George Washington University, hosted by Adam Friedman, MD is comprised of expert guest lectures designed to provide dermatologists and residents with access to the latest bench-to-bedside research and practical pearls.

In this episode, we are joined by presenter Richard Gallo, MD, PhD, an Irma Gigli Distinguished Professor and the Chairman of the Department of Dermatology at the University of California San Diego.

This activity was supported with an educational grant from Galderma. Special thanks to Sanofi Genzyme and Regeneron for their support of this event.
Watch on Vimeo

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New Developments in Tetracycline-Class Antibiotics

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New Developments in Tetracycline-Class Antibiotics

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JDD Podcast

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New Developments in Tetracycline-class Antibiotics

Dr. Christopher Bunick & Dr. Adam Friedman

 

Tetracycline antibiotics are like the Snickers of dermatology. Instead of “Hungry? Grab a Snickers,” “Acne? Grab a tetracycline…” for months even though this goes against clinical guidelines and concerns regarding antimicrobial resistance (woof, thats a mouthful for a slogan). Like a Snickers, they fulfill a need, they’re good for a whole lot, but too much, not so good. We have seen some evolution in maximizing the clinical benefits of our therapeutic Snickers, such as subantimicrobial dosing, but more innovation is needed to get the most anti-inflammatory bang for our buck. Enter the concept of narrow spectrum antibiotics and sarecycline.

 Join host Dr. Adam Friedman on an investigative journey detailing how antibiotic structure and function can meet to yield novel properties with Dr. Chris Bunick, Associate Professor of Dermatology at Yale School of Medicine and captain of crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Hear first hand how a simple idea morphed into a groundbreaking program. Complete your understanding of how antibiotics can be anti-inflammatory. Love the new narrow spectrum lexicon (or try at least).

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This enduring activity is supported by an independent medical education grant provided by Almirall, LLC.
Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this podcast, learners should be able to:
  • Summarize the mechanism of action of tetracycline antibiotics and their role in acne
  • Define narrow spectrum antibiotic, and understand the clinical translation.

Disclosures

 

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD – Grant/Research: Aclaris, CPN, Almirall. Consultant: SanovaWorks, Oakstone Institute, L’oreal, La Roche Posay, Galderma, Aveeno, Valeant, Microcures, Biogen, Pfizer, G&W Laboratories, Novartis, Occulus, Intraderm, Encore, Exeltis, Menlo, Lilly, Aclaris, Dermira, Berg, Allergan, Zylo Therapeutics, Hoth. Speakers’ Bureau: Regeneron, Dermira, Janssen, AbbVie. Major Stock Shareholder: Zylo, Minorcures.
Christopher Bunick, MD, PhD – Grant/Research: Almirall, Consultant: Almirall, Speakers’ Bureau: Almirall

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Watch On Demand: Proper Hydration and Exfoliation Support Treatments for Patients with Inflammatory Skin Conditions

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JDD Webinars

Watch On Demand

This exclusive #SkinChat webinar originally aired on December 16th, 2020. Dr. Leon H. Kircik and Professor Petra Staubach-Renz  discussed the importance of adjunctive skincare solutions for your patients with Keratosis Pilaris and Psoriasis.

Proper hydration and exfoliation support treatments for patients with inflammatory skin conditions

By Heather Onorati

People with conditions characterized by an impaired skin barrier and hyperkeratosis can benefit from incorporating a uniquely formulated skincare regimen with other recommended treatments, according to two experts who shared insights into how a variety of ingredients work to complement therapeutic selections and improve outcomes for these patients. 

In a recent webinar, Professor Petra Staubach-Renz, department of dermatology, University Medical Center, Mainz, Germany, and Leon H. Kircik, M.D., Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, delivered very relevant presentations on adjunctive skincare solutions for hyperkeratolytic conditions.

Dry, rough, uneven skin is a common symptom for many of these hyperkeratolytic conditions, according to Prof. Staubach-Renz. This is characterized by a build-up of cells on the skin’s surface that create an irregular, thick texture. Hyperkeratosis commonly presents in patients with conditions like keratosis pilaris, ichythyosis, psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis.  

More than 40% of people around the world suffer from keratosis pilaris, also called follicular keratosis, Prof. Staubach-Renz noted. In addition, there are more than 125 million people globally who suffer from psoriasis, 60% of which report that the disease significantly affects their lives, Dr. Kircik added. The biggest problems that those affected report are the appearance of the skin and the scaling, which result from transepidermal water loss and a dysfunctional epidermal barrier, he explained. 

Dry, rough, uneven skin is a common symptom for many of these hyperkeratolytic conditions, according to Prof. Staubach-Renz. This is characterized by a build-up of cells on the skin’s surface that create an irregular, thick texture. Hyperkeratois commonly presents in patients with conditions like keratosis pilaris, ichythyosis, psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis.  

According to Prof. Staubach-Renz, this is important to understand in order to treat the skin with the proper basic therapy. There are several critical components, and those include mild exfoliation with keratolytics and an occlusive moisturizer. 

Keratolytics break down the outer layers of the skin, which ultimately allow for other topical therapeutics like corticosteroids to penetrate, Dr. Kircik explained. Often, people who are prescribed topical corticosteroid treatments will complain they are unsatisfied and that the treatment is not working. 

“This is where the keratolytics come into the picture, Dr. Kircik said. Compounds like urea and salicylic acid break down that thick skin and allow the topical medication to penetrate. 

Pairing this activity with humectants and an occlusive will support repair of the epidermal barrier by allowing the skin to attract and then retain moisture.  

One over-the-counter skincare system that utilizes this combination of ingredients in a unique timed-release delivery system demonstrated both efficacy and tolerability in two studies cited by Prof. Staubach-Renz, which examined their use in the treatment of keratosis pilaris. 

Researchers found in one study that patients experienced a decrease in transepidermal water loss 1 hour following use of both a cleanser and cream, cell turnover time accelerated at 3-5 days, and 9 of 10 patients subjectively agreed that the skin felt softer, smoother and more comfortable after week 4. In a second study, the severity of dryness, texture and erythema began to improve at two weeks on dermatologic exam. At 8 weeks, skin dryness was reduced by 76%, and there was a visual improvement in roughness and erythema.

 

 

 

 

Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.

 

 

 

 

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Tirbanibulin Ointment 1% as a Novel Treatment for Actinic Keratosis: Phase 1 and 2 Results

By The Latest No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

Current field-directed treatments of actinic keratosis (AK), a pre-malignant condition, are often limited by severe local reactions and/or complex treatment. Tirbanibulin, a novel potent anti-proliferative synthetic agent that inhibits tubulin polymerization and Src kinase signalling, is being developed as a convenient, safe, and effective field treatment of actinic keratosis.

Read more

Current field-directed treatments of actinic keratosis (AK), a pre-malignant condition, are often limited by severe local reactions and/or complex treatment. Tirbanibulin, a novel potent anti-proliferative synthetic agent that inhibits tubulin polymerization and Src kinase signalling, is being developed as a convenient, safe, and effective field treatment of actinic keratosis.

Steven Kempers MD, Janet DuBois MD, Seth Forman MD, Amy Poon BS MA, Eva Cutler BS BA, Hui Wang PhD, David Cutler MD FRCP(C), Jane Fang MD, Rudolf Kwan MBBS MRCP

 

Actinic keratosis (AK) is a pre-malignant condition, associated with prolonged ultraviolet damage predominantly on the face/scalp, trunk, and extremities. AK affects ~58 million individuals in the US, and typically occurs in males, fair-skinned individuals, and those of advancing age. As the progression of AK to invasive squamous cell carcinoma (iSCC) is unpredictable, the generally accepted approach is to treat all AK.

Current treatments are lesion- or field-directed therapies. Lesion-directed therapies are used when the lesion burden is low; but these modalities can cause scarring and long-term pigmentary changes. Field-directed therapies are used to treat multiple lesions, large areas, and subclinical lesions.

Commonly used topical treatments, while effective, frequently cause moderate-to-severe application-site reactions and deleterious effects on uninvolved skin, which are often considered unacceptable to patients. Moreover, many of these treatments have lengthy or cumbersome dosing regimens that may undermine treatment compliance and compromise efficacy.

Given the disadvantages of available topical therapies, there is a need to develop an agent that has low potential for severe local reactions, effective AK clearance, and convenient dosing.

Read Full Article Now
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Dermatologist looking at skin

What’s New in Dermatology – January 2021

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In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care…

Top 10 Most Talked About Articles of 2020

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As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD.…

Time Intervals Until the First Return Office Visit After New Medications

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Making contact with patients within a week of prescribing a new medication may improve treatment adherence, suggest the authors of a recent study.

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Making contact with patients within a week of prescribing a new medication may improve treatment adherence, suggest the authors of a recent study.

Heather Onorati

Making contact with patients within a week of prescribing a new medication may improve treatment adherence, suggest the authors of a recent study.

In patients with acne, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, specifically, poor adherence to topical treatments has been a common challenge, according to studies. One reported reason is dissatisfaction with treatment efficacy. Closing the gap between prescription and follow-up visit may encourage patients to fill prescriptions sooner; initial efficacy may motivate further compliance, according to the study.

“Shortening the time to the first return visit may make doing the treatment appear to be less burdensome,” write Steven R. Feldman, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues.

The group analyzed data representing 10.9 million estimated visits that were logged in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and represented diagnoses for acne, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis between the years 2014 and 2016, which was the most recent available data. The time to a first return visit for patients with acne, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis who were prescribed at least one new medication was often more than two months regardless of whether they were prescribed a new medication.

Whether reasons for scheduling long intervals are due to tradition or unawareness of more optimal timeframes is not well known, the authors write.

Previous studies have indicated that adherence increases around the time of an office visit and then decreases rapidly in the days afterward, they note. Physicians may be able to use this tendency to create accountability for patients to begin and continue treatments.

“If a decreased interval between office visits can improve initial adherence, patients may see greater efficacy when using medications and be encouraged to continue their treatments,” the authors write.

While in-person follow-up visits may not be feasible for all patients due to travel distance, cost or other barriers, the authors note other methods of contacting and engaging the patient that have been shown to improve adherence, such as phone calls, emails, text messages and telemedicine visits.

“A lack of accountability may be an underappreciated component of non-adherence,” the authors write. “The timing of return visits may be an important factor to consider … for overcoming the adherence hurdle.”

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Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.
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Recommendations for Preparing a Disaster Response Plan

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Dermatologist looking at skin

What’s New in Dermatology – January 2021

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care…

Top 10 Most Talked About Articles of 2020

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD.…

Adjunctive Skincare Solutions for Hyperkeratotic Skin Conditions, Including Keratosis Pilaris and Psoriasis

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This #SkinChat orignally aired on December 16th, 2020. Tune in as Dr. Leon H. Kircik and Professor Petra Staubach-Renz discuss the importance of adjunctive skincare solutions for your patients with Keratosis Pilaris and Psoriasis.

Supported By

CeraVe #SkinChat

 

Adjunctive Skincare Solutions for Hyperkeratotic Skin Conditions, Including Keratosis Pilaris and Psoriasis

Featuring Leon Kircik, MD & Prof. Petra Staubach-Renz

Watch On Demand

Join the JDD & CeraVe for this exclusive, on-demand #SkinChat webcast, where Dr. Leon H. Kircik and Professor Petra Staubach-Renz discuss the importance of adjunctive skincare solutions for your patients with Keratosis Pilaris and Psoriasis.

This presentation  also includes relevant clinical data supporting the need for ceramides and skin barrier restoration regarding these Keratolytic skin conditions.

Faculty

Leon Kircik, MD
Clinical Professor of Dermatology
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN
Medical Director
Physicians Skin Care, PLLC, Louisville, KY
DermResearch, PLLC, Louisville, KY
Skin Sciences, PLLC, Louisville, KY

Prof. Petra Staubach-Renz
Senior Physician Dermatology and Allergy
Managing Director, Clinical Research Centre,
Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center
Mainz, Germany
Watch on Vimeo

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Current Understanding of the Pathophysiology, Etiology, Prevalence & Burden of AD

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How to Listen

Current Understanding of the Pathophysiology, Etiology, Prevalence & Burden of AD

Dr. Peter Lio and Dr. Adam Friedman

 

In part 2 of this 5 part podcast homage to Atopic Dermatitis, JDD Podcast host Dr. Adam Friedman is joined by the dynamic dermatitis duo Dr. Anna De Benedetto, Associate Professor of Dermatology at the University of Florida, and Dr. Eric Simpson, Professor of Dermatology at the School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University, to dissect established and emerging pathophysiologic details of this dastardly dermatitis.

Dig in to determine best evidence based management practices to dampen the long standing burden of disease. Discover delightful discourse between three dedicated AD investigators/caregivers. Do listen, don’t scratch.

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This podcast is supported by an independent medical education grant provided by Sanofi Genzyme Regeneron.

 

Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this podcast, learners should be able to:
  • Summarize recent scientific understanding of the pathophysiology, etiology and prevalence of atopic dermatitis in patients of all age groups
  • Recognize the implications of long-term treatment options on effective patient outcomes.

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Insights On the Pediatric, Adolescent & Adult AD Patient

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