All Posts By

Lindsay OConnor

View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

By Featured Articles, JDD Highlights No Comments

Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Read the October JDD Now

Atopic Dermatitis, Public Health, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Article Highlights

 

Editor's Picks

You May Also Like

View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

| Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

NEW Webinar – Differentiating Approach to Acne Therapy: Women Vs. Men

By JDD Webinars No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Webinar

Join Leon H. Kircik, MD and Julie Harper, MD as they discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris.

  • October 27th, 2020
  • 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM EST
Register Now!

Join Drs. Leon H. Kircik, MD and Julie Harper, MD as they discuss Acne severity and grade (comedonal, papulopustular, mixed, nodular), skin type, presence of acne scarring and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, menstrual cycle history (in women), and more, as well as the factors influencing treatment with classes of topical agents.

Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory dermatologic disease affecting an estimated 80% of the population at some point in their life; 85% of adolescents and young adult s may experience acne and prevalent in adults with more adult women being afflicted than adult men, raising the possibility that gender difference in skin may influence the pathogenesis of acne and
treatment response.
Dermatologists indicate late-onset or adult -onset acne is becoming increasingly common in women in their 20s to 50s and research shows a large number of women over age 25 have acne and the prevalence of acne remains constant until age 44 at which time there is a decrease in incidence.
Join Drs. Leon H. Kircik, MD and Julie Harper, MD as they discuss Acne severity and grade (comedonal, papulopustular, mixed, nodular), skin type, presence of acne scarring and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, menstrual cycle history (in women), and more, as well as the factors influencing treatment with classes of topical agents.
Register Now!

You May Also Like

View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

| Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

By Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer No Comments

JDD Multimedia

JDD Podcast

Listen Now

How to Listen

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman

 

Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder…the list goes on. What about not following practices that have a library of evidence supporting their use, like sunscreen and photo-protection?

To better understand this conundrum JDD Podcast host Dr. Adam Friedman recruited mental health guru Dr. Sherry Pagoto, Professor in the Department of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Connecticut and Director of the UConn Center for mHealth and Social Media, to dive deep into human behavior and how this relates to medical compliance.
Find a couch to lie down on as you digest the litany of psychosocial pearls Dr. Pagoto shares, rounded out by some evidenced based guidance on using social media to engage a broader audience. #dontmissthispodcast
This podcast was supported by Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc.
Listen Now
CME Available
This enduring continuing education activity is supported by an independent medical education grant provided by Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Participants who earn a minimum, passing grade of 70% would be eligible to receive up to 0.5 credit hours AMA PRA Category 1™ and ANCC credit per podcast. A total of 1 hour for this two-part Sun Protection series.

Learning Objectives

 

Upon completion of this enduring, internet-based series of continuing education activities,  participants should be able to:
  • Develop strategies leading to effective clinician-patient dialogues to better motivate patients to integrate regular use of sunscreens in their skin care regimen
Take CME Now

You May Also Like

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman   Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with…

Premiere Webinar Event: Recognizing the Role of The Sebaceous Gland in Acne

By JDD Webinars No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Webinar

Join Leon H. Kircik, MD and James Q. Del Rosso, DO, FAOCD, FAAD as they discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris.

Register Now!

Join Leon H. Kircik, MD and James Q. Del Rosso, DO, FAOCD, FAAD as they discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris.

Androgen and androgen receptor (AR) may play important roles in several skin related diseases including androgenetic alopecia and acne vulgaris and recent studies suggest AR and androgens play distinct roles in the skin pathogenesis, and AR seems to be a better target than androgens for the treatment of these skin diseases.

Tune in as Leon H. Kircik, MD and James Q. Del Rosso, DO, FAOCD, FAAD discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris, and how suppressing AR function by treating with antiandrogens alone, or in combination with antibiotics (i.e., to reduce bacterial infection) might be a potential therapeutic approach to treat acne more effectively.

The results of this open-label clinical study suggest that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

Register Now!

You May Also Like

View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

| Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

By Aesthetics, Featured Articles No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

Read more

A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (“Efficacy and Tolerability of a Skin Brightening/Anti-Aging Cosmeceutical Containing Retinol 0.5%, Niacinamide, Hexylresorcinol, and Resveratrol“), which was recently cited in an article on Prevention.com, suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection. 

Patricia Farris MD, Joshua Zeichner MD, and Diane Berson MD

 

Consumers are increasingly interested in over-the-counter skin care products that can improve the appearance of photodamaged and aging skin. This 10-week, open-label, single- center study enrolled 25 subjects with mild to moderate hyperpigmentation and other clinical stigmata of cutaneous aging including fine lines, sallowness, lack of clarity, and wrinkling. Their mean age was 53.4±7.7 years. The test product contained retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide 4.4%, resveratrol 1%, and hexylresorcinol 1.1% in a moisturizing base. Subjects were provided a skin care regimen including a cleanser, hydrating serum, moisturizer, and an SPF 30 sunscreen for daily use. The test product was applied only at night.

The use of this skin brightening/anti-aging cosmeceutical was found to provide statistically significant improvements in all efficacy endpoints by study end. Fine lines, radiance, and smoothness were significantly improved as early as week 2 (P<.001). By week 4, hyperpigmentation, overall skin clarity, evenness of skin tone, and wrinkles showed statistically significant improvement compared to baseline. Mild retinoid dermatitis including flaking and redness occurred early in the study as reflected by tolerability scores. By week 10, subjects reported no stinging, itching, dryness, or tingling.

The results of this open-label clinical study suggest that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

Read Full Article Now
Article Cited in this Post

You May Also Like

View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

| Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Biological Effects of Hyaluronic Acid-Based Dermal Fillers and Laser Therapy on Human Skin Models

By Aesthetics, Features No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

This study investigates the molecular effects of different stabilized HA and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-based fillers with and without subsequent additional fractional laser co-treatment.

Read more

This study investigates the molecular effects of different stabilized HA and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-based fillers with and without subsequent additional fractional laser co-treatment.

Laura Huth PhD, Yvonne Marquardt, Ruth Heise PhD, Katharina Fietkau, Jens Malte Baron MD, Sebastian Huth PhD

 

Injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal fillers is one of the most frequently performed aesthetic procedures. HA fillers exist in many different formulations differing in HA concentration, particle size and cross-linking density.

While HA fillers with high-density and large particles are recommended for deep dermal injections, fillers with low-density and small particles are more commonly used for fine lines.

The direct biological effects of dermal fillers monotherapy and combination therapy with ablative fractional CO2- or Er:YAG laser irradiation on human skin cells are not completely understood. Organotypic three-dimensional (3D) skin equivalents have been established for standardized studies of the human skin.

The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular effects of different stabilized HA and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-based fillers with and without subsequent additional fractional laser co-treatment.

Read Full Article Now
Article Cited in this Post

You May Also Like

View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

| Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

By Aesthetics, Featured Articles No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin.

Read more

Improvements in skin health is a well-researched benefit of taking collagen – in fact, according to a January 2019 Journal of Drugs in Dermatology study, (recently featured in an Every Day Health article, ” 8 Potential Benefits of Collagen – and 1 Thing it Can’t Do”), 800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin.

Franchesca D. Choi BS RPh, Calvin T. Sung BS, Margit L.W. Juhasz MD, Natasha Atanaskova Mesinkovska MD PhD

Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been rising.

In 2016, the collagen market was valued at an estimated 3.71 billion USD and is projected to reach 6.63 billion USD by 2025. Collagen supplements, originating from various sources (eg, porcine, bovine, marine) and available in numerous formulations (eg, protein, gelatin, hydrolysate, peptides), are marketed as improving skin integrity and modulating skin aging.

However, even with this increase in patient interest and market share, the use of collagen supplementation in dermatology remains controversial due to the lack of regulation on quality and quantity of ingredients in over-the-counter collagen supplements, as well as minimal peer-reviewed literature on the subject. Fortunately, there are increasing numbers of clinical studies regarding potential effects of collagen-based dietary supplements on skin.

Read Full Article Now
Article Cited in this Post

You May Also Like

View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

| Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

By Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer No Comments

JDD Multimedia

JDD Podcast

Listen Now

How to Listen

The Science of Sun Protection
Part I

Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman

 

Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths, and offer our first born children to get our patients to utilize sunscreen the right way when this behavior directly and primarily benefits them. Why is this and how do we airdrop knowledge in a meaningful way?
In part one of this bonus two part podcast series dedicated to the science and psychology of sunscreen use, AAD Vice President Elect Neal Bhatia, MD joins host Adam Friedman, MD to slather on some practical approaches to communicating sunscreen science and real world use.
Listen Now
CME Credits Available
This enduring continuing education activity is supported by an independent medical education grant provided by Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. 
Participants who earn a minimum, passing grade of 70% would be eligible to receive up to 0.5 credit hours AMA PRA Category 1™ and ANCC credit per podcast. A total of 1 hour for this two-part Sun Protection series.
Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this enduring, internet-based series of continuing education activities,  participants should be able to:
  • Differentiate features, benefits and limits of chemical and physical sunblocking products
  • Discuss the role of product formulation, delivery vehicle and patient type when recommending sun protection strategies
  • Review multifunctional approaches to photoprotection including use of sunscreen-containing moisturizers and other skin care products
  • Develop strategies leading to effective clinician-patient dialogues to better motivate patients to integrate regular use of sunscreens in their skin care regimen
Take CME Now

You May Also Like

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman   Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with…

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

By Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Photoprotection, Skin of Color No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen.

Read more

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen.

Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl E Grimes MD, Stephen Lynch PhD, Kalli Ji PhD, Manisha Brahmachary PhD, Qian Zheng Md PhD, Charbel Bouez PhD, Janet Wangari-Talbot PhD

 

 

Visible light (400–700nm), which contributes to 45% of solar radiation, contributes to skin darkening and worsening of dyschromias, particularly in individuals with Fitzpatrick skin phototypes III and higher.

The pathogenesis of melasma is incompletely understood, which poses a challenge for disease management. Causative factors include genetics, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, cosmetics, pregnancy, hormonal therapy, phototoxic drugs, and various medications.

Currently, sunscreens provide limited protection against that spectrum. Due to their capabilities in absorbing, scattering, and reflecting visible light, topical products containing pigments and/or metal oxides can provide additional photoprotection.

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Expert grading and colorimetry demonstrated that the iron-oxide containing formulations significantly protected against visible light-induced pigmentation compared to untreated skin or mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen in Fitzpatrick IV individuals.

Read Full Article Now
Article Cited in this Post

Open Access Articles

The Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD) presents Open Access content, unrestricted access to our original articles, award-winning case studies, clinical trial reviews and clearance updates, drugs and devices, and special content geared toward medical residents and other allied health professionals.
Articles are reviewed by the Editorial Board of renowned experts, from key opinion leaders to well-known clinicians. View our open-access dermatology articles now.
View All Open Access Articles

You May Also Like

View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

| Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

By Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer No Comments

JDD Multimedia

JDD Podcast

Listen Now

How to Listen

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman

 

Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with substantial baggage adding to this proclamation with skin, hair, and nail adverse events significantly impacting quality of life and even treatment course.
Enter supportive oncodermatology, and along with it the mastermind behind this rapidly emerging field, Dr. Mario Lacouture, Professor and Director of the Oncodermatology Program in the Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.
Dr. Lacatoure joins podcast host Dr. Adam Friedman to discuss the array of cutaneous clusters that not only can, but are almost expected to occur during cancer therapy. Learn how even simple OTC products can contribute to both ameliorating and even preventing some of these sequelae. Understand how you (yeah, I’m talkin’ to you) can make an extraordinary impact in these patients’ lives. Tune in to this podcast to support your supportive oncoderm fund of knowledge.
This podcast was supported by Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc.
Listen Now
Upcoming Related Supplement:
  • The Biological Impact of Oats: Eczema and Beyond
  • Blair Allais MD and Adam Friedman MD FAAD
  • Department of Dermatology, George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC
  • October 2020 | Volume 19 | Issue 10 | Supplement| Copyright © October 2020

You May Also Like

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman   Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with…

View the Latest Discoveries in Skin Cancer Research

By Skin Cancer No Comments

Dermatology Resource Centers

JDD Resource Centers

Stay up-to-date on new clinical findings in Skin Cancer  View the latest articles, case reports, supplements, Podcast episodes and more!

Skin Cancer Resource Center

The Latest Clinical Findings in Skin Cancer

Discover the latest research in Skin Cancer: introducing the JDD Skin Cancer Resource Center.

Review clinical findings, articles, case reports, supplements, podcast episodes and more.

Skin Cancer Articles

  • Impact of a 31-gene Expression Profiling Test for Cutaneous Melanoma on Dermatologists’ Clinical Management Decision

    Following a diagnosis of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), patients are often guided for subsequent management by their dermatologist and national guideline recommendations. Based upon staging classification for CMM, guidelines recommend diagnostic tests and additional evaluation which may provide defined treatment protocols, surveillance, and follow-up.

     

  • A Randomized Trial of Broad Area ALA–PDT for Field Cancerization Mitigation in High-Risk Patients

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) are precancerous, dysplastic epidermal lesions with potential for progression to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). A study by Criscione et al1 revealed that in a high-risk population (≥2 keratinocyte carcinomas in previous 5 years), approximately 65% of all primary SCCs arose in lesions previously diagnosed as AKs. Furthermore, it demonstrated that the risk of malignant progression of AKs to primary SCC increases over time (0.6% at 1 year and 2.6% at 4 years).1 Cellular damage and atypia seen histologically in AKs are similar to those of surrounding nonlesional skin,2,3 suggesting that skin surrounding AKs may have an increased risk of skin cancer.

     

  • Multiple Primary Melanomas Occurring Around the Same Time: A Review of Terminology and Implications

    Multiple primary melanomas (MPMs) have been reported to occur in 2-10% of melanoma patients. This study conducted a review of the literature to elucidate the definitions of terminology used to describe MPMs that were diagnosed in close temporal proximity as well as explore common risk factors. Terminology found in the literature included “concurrent”, “simultaneous” and “synchronous” with varying definitions that ranged from 0-6 months between diagnoses of the first and subsequent melanomas. Eight cases are described in chronological order, and the incidence of MPMs diagnosed around the same time were reported as 22-39%. Nevus spilus was identified as a potential risk factor for MPMs. This study highlights that MPMs are not uncommon, and clinicians should remain aware that MPMs can be diagnosed at or around the same time, warranting thorough skin exams.

 
View All Skin Cancer Articles

Case Reports

  • Basal Cell Carcinoma in the Nasal Vestibule

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCC) arise from DNA damage to cells of the basal layer of the epidermis and most commonly in areas of the skin exposed to sunlight or ultraviolet radiation. BCC is the most common skin cancer seen in humans with over 4.3 million cases reported in the United States and is responsible for 3-10% of all cancers annually. We report what we believe to be the first case of this very prevalent skin cancer arising in the nasal vestibule. The lesion was treated with Mohs micrographic surgery and required three stages to obtain histological clearance. Given the location of the tumor, Mohs surgery was chosen due to the procedure’s effectiveness for achieving the highest cure rate with the lowest incidence of tumor recurrence and for preserving as much adjacent healthy tissue as possible

     

  • Combination Topical Chemotherapy for the Treatment of an Invasive Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Standard of care for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is usually surgical, with either excision or Mohs micrographic surgery. However, surgery may not be ideal for elderly patients with numerous lesions, who are poor surgical candidates or who refuse surgery. Topical 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and imiquimod have been studied off-label as monotherapies in the treatment of SCC in situ with promising results. However, long-term tumor-free survival rates are still less than with surgical management.

     

  • Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising Within a Linear Porokeratosis

    Here we report a case of linear porokeratosis with recurrent malignant degeneration to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) recurring six years after excision of initial SCC. A 79-year-old woman presented with a friable tumor located within a longstanding lesion on her posterior thigh. Six years prior, she was diagnosed with SCC arising within the same lesion, which had been surgically excised with negative margins. Physical examination revealed a 3.5 x 2.7 cm friable tumor on the left proximal posterior thigh.

 
View All Skin Cancer Case Reports

You May Also Like

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman   Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with…

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

By Aesthetics, CME Activities, Featured Articles No Comments

CME Activities

Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.

Take CME Now

Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.

As the aging US population is growing, minimally invasive strategies have become the primary treatment modalities for addressing mild to moderate age-related facial changes. The introduction of microfocused ultrasound (MFU) represents a method to produce a deeper wound healing response with increased collagen remodeling and more durable clinical response. MFU-V treatment protocols continue to be refined and use in combination with other minimally invasive strategies including injectable dermal fillers such as diluted calcium hydroxylapatite for skin laxity and appearance of lines in the neck and décolletage has been studied.

Need exists for expanded understanding of dermatology providers on the application of microfocused ultrasound in combination with injectable dermal fillers as a treatment approach for lifting skin on the neck and face and for improving lines and wrinkles on the chest

CME Certificate Information

  • This CME examination requires a 70% pass mark to receive the CME credit and certificate.
  • This activity is supported by an educational grant provided by Galderma Laboratories, L.P.

Upon completion of this continuing education activity participants should be able to:

  • Summarize the mechanism of action of high-resolution ultrasound imaging (MFU-V) for lifting skin on the neck and face, improving lines and wrinkles on the chest and improving collagen synthesis
  • Identify patients best suited for treatment with MFU-V in combination with injectable dermal fillers
  • Compare features, benefits, and safety profile MFU-V treatment in lifting skin on the neck and face and for improving lines and wrinkles on the chest
Take CME Now

You May Also Like

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

| Aesthetics, CME Activities, Featured Articles | No Comments
Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…

Expiring Soon: Capturing Consensus and Cutting Out Misconceptions regarding the Aesthetic Skin of Color Consumer

| CME Activities | No Comments
0.5 CME Credits Who knows what’s best/worst for facial aesthetics in the skin of color patient? No really who? Because there is a great deal of folklore and ballyhoo related…

Re-examining the Optimal Use of Neuromodulators and the Changing Landscape: A Consensus Panel Update

| CME Activities | No Comments
1 CME CreditSince initial US Food and Drug Administration approval of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) for aesthetic use in 2002, clinical evidence and experience with BoNT-A and understanding of…