Tag

dermatology Archives - JDDonline - Journal of Drugs in Dermatology

Starting Your Own Dermatology Practice: Expert Panel Discussion

By JDD Webinars No Comments

JDD Multimedia

Video Pearls

In this exclusive Webcast, expert panelists discuss their experiences with securing financing, choosing devices, hiring contractors and running a practice. They also provide insights into what they wish they knew before beginning their practice, offer practical tips and much more!

 

Supported by

Starting Your Own Dermatology Practice

Expert Panel Discussion

ODAC in partnership with the JDD, invite you to join your dermatology colleagues as we discuss strategies, steps and best practices for starting your own dermatology practice.
In this exclusive Webcast, expert panelists discuss their experiences with securing financing, choosing devices, hiring contractors and running a practice. They also provide insights into what they wish they knew before beginning their practice, offer practical tips and much more!

 

View on Demand Now

MODERATOR

  • Aanand N. Geria, MD, FAAD (Founder, Geria Dermatology – Rutherford, NJ)

PANELISTS

  • Matthew J. Elias, DO, FAAD (Co-Founder, Elias Dermatology – Fort Lauderdale, FL)
  • Rishi K. Gandhi, MD, FAAD (CEO & Director, Ohio Skin Surgery and Cosmetic Center – Dayton, OH)
  • Chesahna Kindred, MD, MBA, FAAD (Founder, Kindred Hair & Skin Center – Columbia, MD)
  • Omar N. Qutub, MD FAAD (Founder, Dermatology By Design LLC – Portland, OR)

View more on-demand webcasts from the JDD.

JDD Webinars

You May Also Like

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

The Science of Sun Protection

| Podcast | No Comments
Episode 1 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often…

A Must-Read: The Business of Dermatology

By Derm Community No Comments

Dermatology News

Derm Community

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining a practice.

Learn More

The Business of Dermatology

Review by Omer Ibrahim, MD

Business intellect, a vital aspect of managing a practice, is not taught in residency. From the infancy of their training, dermatologists are trained to think broadly and scrupulously, using each clue, each corporeal sense, and each available tool to accurately diagnose and manage a plethora of cutaneous conditions. After residency, dermatologists set out armed with the knowledge and drive to deliver expert care to their future patients. However, despite their education and best intentions, lack of business acumen can hinder even the brightest and most motivated of practitioners. In order to enlighten oneself in the complicated field of business management, clinicians are left to fend for themselves, often learning as they go, sometimes making unnecessary mistakes, and adjusting their business practices reactively. Retrospective “trial and error” learning is time-consuming, cumbersome, and costly. Why not short track and get the goods without the trial and error, making costly mistakes and taking years. The new book, The Business of Dermatology is a cornerstone achievement in the standardization of business education for dermatologists.

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining a practice. To start, the power of this textbook fundamentally lies in the experience and scope of its authorship.

The authors were hand-selected by the editors ensuring that each chapter was written by a tried and true expert in that subject. Unlike other textbooks in the field of business management and administration that are primarily written by individuals from the business world, some of whom have no insight into the inner machinations of the medical world, or hands-on experience, the authors of this book are well-known, respected dermatologists that hail from thriving practices of their own. The reader has an unprecedented opportunity to learn from the firsthand experiences of top authorities who live and breathe dermatology. Using conversational prose, the authors depict their experiences, trials, and errors, employing specific real-world examples and scenarios while tackling each subject.

A notable forte of The Business of Dermatology is the sheer breadth and range of topics discussed in the textbook by medical as well as surgical dermatologists. Opening and managing a practice is a daunting endeavor with twists, turns, and hidden hurdles that one cannot foresee until stumbling across them. The Business of Dermatology unveils those twists, turns, and hurdles for the reader, taking the “guessing game” out of the equation. Fifty-five chapters elucidate every aspect of running a practice, covering all practice-relevant topics, including office space and equipment, managing financials, diverse practice models, human resources, employment considerations, patient issues, pricing, essential surgical tools/supplies, marketing, and much more. The Business of Dermatology lays bare every facet of handling a dermatologic practice, so much so that even a well-run, seasoned practice stands to learn new tools and tips to elevate itself to a higher level.

And now more than ever in the “Time of Covid” we are in desperate need of information from The Business of Dermatology. Many of us are inventing the wheel with the significant changes that are occurring in Dermatology, and the practice of our specialty.

The wealth of knowledge endowed in each chapter is written and formatted in such a style that renders each chapter extremely easy to read and comprehend. First, the prose used in the chapters is conversational – as such, the reader is fully immersed in each topic as if he/she were having a face-to-face chat with the authors. Furthermore, references are used only when absolutely necessary. The reader is not bogged down by superfluous references and discussions that may dim the vital discussion points of the chapters. Finally, embedded within each chapter are practical tips that are immediately implementable and a Top Ten list that highlights the key take-home points, making “reading on the run” possible. The novice practice owner need not fear the residency dogma of “trying to drink from a gushing fire hydrant” with this easy-to-read, catchy and focused textbook.

And now more than ever in the “Time of Covid” we are in desperate need of information from The Business of Dermatology. Many of us are inventing the wheel with the significant changes that are occurring in Dermatology, and the practice of our specialty.

The wealth of knowledge endowed in each chapter is written and formatted in such a style that renders each chapter extremely easy to read and comprehend. First, the prose used in the chapters is conversational – as such, the reader is fully immersed in each topic as if he/she were having a face-to-face chat with the authors. Furthermore, references are used only when absolutely necessary. The reader is not bogged down by superfluous references and discussions that may dim the vital discussion points of the chapters. Finally, embedded within each chapter are practical tips that are immediately implementable and a Top Ten list that highlights the key take-home points, making “reading on the run” possible. The novice practice owner need not fear the residency dogma of “trying to drink from a gushing fire hydrant” with this easy-to-read, catchy and focused textbook.

With a vast wealth of information relevant to the business side of a dermatology practice, this remarkable resource fills the gap between the training phase and acquisition of professional confidence. Every dermatologist, whether early in their career or well-seasoned, or in a solo practice or a large group, will benefit from this textbook. At a price of $89.99, The Business of Dermatology is affordable and accessible online and in-print – the 350 chapter pages of business wisdom are worth every cent. (And at $64.99 you can access just the digital version.)

Get Your Copy Today

The Business of Dermatology by Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla

 

You May Also Like

AestheticsFeatured Articles
September 14, 2020

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…
AestheticsFeatured ArticlesPhotoprotectionSkin of Color
September 9, 2020

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…
AestheticsCME ActivitiesFeatured Articles
September 1, 2020

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…

GW Survey Evaluates Influence of Social Media in Attracting Patients

By Featured Articles No Comments

Dermatology News

Featured Article

“A rapidly growing number of dermatologists are advocating for the value of social media to promote their practices,” said Adam Friedman, MD, interim chair of the Department of Dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences and senior author on the study. “Only one other survey has been conducted on patient perception of social media. There hasn’t been enough to show us how effective social media is as a marketing tool for dermatologists.”

Read Article Now

GW Survey Evaluates Influence of Social Media in Attracting Patients

A survey from the George Washington University evaluated whether patients consider a dermatologist’s social media presence when looking for a doctor

WASHINGTON (May 7, 2020) – Patients often do not take social media into consideration when looking for a dermatologist, according to a survey from researchers at the George Washington University. The survey was published recently in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.

As of 2019, 79% of Americans have a social media presence on platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Many dermatologists consider social media to be a useful tool for building their practices and recruiting patients. However, limited data exists about whether a provider’s social media presence is a driver in attracting new patients to their practice.

“A rapidly growing number of dermatologists are advocating for the value of social media to promote their practices,” said Adam Friedman, MD, interim chair of the Department of Dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences and senior author on the study. “Only one other survey has been conducted on patient perception of social media. There hasn’t been enough to show us how effective social media is as a marketing tool for dermatologists.”

The GW research team distributed a 10-question online survey to a diverse patient population to evaluate their perceptions of social media and what aspects of a dermatologist’s site are the most helpful. Only 25% of respondents aged 18–30 years old thought social media was extremely or very important, suggesting that leaning on social media may not be the best way to grow a practice.

The results also indicated that respondents who did utilize social media for these purposes were interested in seeing patient education, viewing patient reviews, as well as dermatologists’ experience levels rather than personal information.

“While patients overall may not rely on social media to select a dermatologist nor be interested in nonmedical content, many of our respondents did express interest in educational content written by their dermatologists on social media,” Friedman said. “Practitioners should still count social media as a tool in building their practices and engaging their current patients, however, it should be one of many methods that they rely on to recruit new patients.”

The authors say that further research needs to be done to determine whether social media is an effective educational tool for dermatologists.

Read Article Now

You May Also Like

AestheticsFeatured Articles
September 14, 2020

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…
AestheticsFeatured ArticlesPhotoprotectionSkin of Color
September 9, 2020

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…
AestheticsCME ActivitiesFeatured Articles
September 1, 2020

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…

Supportive Oncodermatology Interventions Improve Patient Quality of Life

By Derm Community, Skin Cancer No Comments

Dermatology News

National Skin Cancer Month

Enrollment in a supportive oncodermatology program is associated with a significantly improved quality of life score, according to a recent survey from the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center. The results of the survey were published in the May issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.

Read JDD Article Now

"Supportive Oncodermatology Interventions Improve Patient Quality of Life"

Enrollment in a supportive oncodermatology program is associated with a significantly improved quality of life score, according to a recent survey from the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center. The results of the survey were published in the May issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.

Improved Quality of Life

Supportive oncodermatology is a growing field that provides treatment and preventive care to oncology patients who experience adverse dermatologic events associated with their cancer treatments. While dermatologic health in cancer patients is gaining attention, the literature evaluating the impact of supportive oncodermatology clinics on patient quality of life is limited.

To identify the impact of these programs, the group at GW performed a cross-sectional survey of adult cancer patients enrolled at the Supportive Oncodermatology Clinic at GW Cancer Center. Those who met inclusion criteria were invited to complete an online survey with questions adapted from the Dermatology Life Quality Index and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire.

“Our results show that patient quality of life benefited significantly from enrollment in the clinic’s programs,” said Adam Friedman, MD, director of the GW Supportive Oncodermatology Clinic, interim chair of the Department of Dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and senior author on the study. “The supportive oncodermatology field is a critical element of multidisciplinary cancer care that addresses dermatologic wellness in cancer patients.”

The respondents reported satisfaction with the care they received at the GW Supportive Oncodermatology Clinic, especially in terms of providers’ interpersonal manner and communication and would recommend this type of care to other cancer patients.

Prior to receiving care at the clinic, patients had an average quality of life score of 6.5, indicating a “moderate effect” dermatologic adverse events have on quality of life. On average, scores were significantly reduced by 2.7 points after joining the clinic.

While patients reported overall satisfaction with dermatologic care, many reported being unsure if those interventions aided in adherence to anticancer treatment. Because of this, the authors pointed out, it is necessary to develop evidence-based management systems for dermatologic adverse effects.

The article, titled “The Influence of Supportive Oncodermatology Interventions on Patient Quality of Life: A Cross-Sectional Survey,” is published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology and is available at jddonline.com/articles/dermatology/S1545961620P0477X.

You May Also Like

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

The Science of Sun Protection

| Podcast | No Comments
Episode 1 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often…

#ShareTheFacts About Skin Cancer

By Derm Community, Skin Cancer No Comments

Dermatology News

National Skin Cancer Month

Dermatologists play an important role in helping to save lives, by educating patients, and the public, on skin cancer prevention; the dangers of unprotected exposure, and how to detect early warning signs.

#ShareTheFacts About Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, but is also one of the most preventable.

Dermatologists play an important role in helping to save lives, by educating patients, and the public, on skin cancer prevention; the dangers of unprotected exposure; and how to detect early warning signs  –  early detection means a high probability of eliminating it entirely.

#ShareTheFacts

This month, the Skin Cancer Foundation invites providers to #sharethefacts on skin cancer by accessing its set of downloadable images and resources to help patients stay informed on skin cancer treatment and prevention.

Visit the Skin Cancer Foundation to learn more about its #ShareTheFacts campaign, and how you can help.

Learn More

You May Also Like

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

The Science of Sun Protection

| Podcast | No Comments
Episode 1 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often…

The Influence of Dermatologists’ Use of Social Media on Attracting Patients

By Featured Articles No Comments

JDD Multimedia

Featured Article

Emily C. Murphy BS, Kamaria Nelson MD, and Adam J. Friedman MD

In a new article, published in the May 2020 issue of the JDD,  “The Influence of Dermatologists’ Use of Social Media on Attracting Patients,” authors Emily C. Murphy BS,a,b Kamaria Nelson MD,a and Adam J. Friedman MDa examine how social media influences patients when choosing a dermatologist and the aspects of dermatologists’ sites that offer the most benefits to patients.

Read Article Now

"The Influence of Dermatologists’ Use of Social Media on Attracting Patients"

As of 2019, 79% of Americans have a social media profile, with the majority using platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram.1 Social media was originally created to connect with family and friends, but individuals now use it to self-promote, to disseminate information, and for activism.

Physicians are even more likely to use social media than the general population, with 87% having an account in 2011.2 In the medical community, social media allows for the distribution of health information and may increase healthcare access by connecting patients and physicians.3,4 Despite these benefits, there is also concern among practitioners about the misuse of social media given its lack of regulation, which may lead to inappropriate online consultations, spread of false information, and HIPAA violations.3

In a new article, published in the May 2020 issue of the JDD,  “The Influence of Dermatologists’ Use of Social Media on Attracting Patients,” authors Emily C. Murphy BS,a,b Kamaria Nelson MD,a and Adam J. Friedman MDa examine how social media influences patients when choosing a dermatologist and the aspects of dermatologists’ sites that offer the most benefits to patients.

Read Article Now

You May Also Like

AestheticsFeatured Articles
September 14, 2020

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…
AestheticsFeatured ArticlesPhotoprotectionSkin of Color
September 9, 2020

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…
AestheticsCME ActivitiesFeatured Articles
September 1, 2020

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…

Current Issue Highlights

By JDD Highlights No Comments

New Dermatological Research is available now- view this months’ JDD features, case reports, and research below:

View these articles and more now!

Read the JDD Now

You May Also Like

Featured ArticlesJDD Highlights
August 31, 2020

View the Latest Discoveries in Aesthetics, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

The September issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on aesthetic treatments, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…
JDD Highlights
August 5, 2020

The Latest Research & Discoveries in Psoriasis, Anti-Aging, Aesthetics, and Medical Dermatology

The August issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Psoriasis, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.…
JDD HighlightsSkin of Color
June 30, 2020

View the Latest Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology Articles Now

The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.…

Global Pandemic: A Statement from the JDD

By Derm Community, Global Health No Comments

Dear JDD readers and colleagues,

The global COVID-19 pandemic has greatly impacted our lives: how we gather and connect has changed to ensure the health and safety of our communities.
During this time, as researchers, health professionals, and scientists around the world collaborate to develop solutions to protect our global community, the JDD has committed to continuing to publish the latest research, updates, and information to help providers better serve patients.
To support community collaboration, the JDD has premiered an online blog where registered users may comment and connect with other dermatology professionals to share information and learn: www.jddonline.com/jdd-blog.
Additionally, stay up-to-date with the latest developments by following JDD on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn.
The JDD is committed to providing timely information pertaining to new methods, techniques, drug therapies and devices to our dedicated community of healthcare professionals.

We thank you for your continued support, and wish you all well.

Stay Connected

You May Also Like

Derm Community
June 16, 2020

A Must-Read: The Business of Dermatology

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining…
Derm CommunityODACPhotoprotectionSkin Cancer
June 1, 2020

Controversies in Photoprotection

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD is Professor and Interim Chair of Dermatology and serves as Residency Program Director, Director of Translational Research, and Director of the Supportive OncodermatologyProgram in the Department…
Derm CommunityODACSkin Cancer
May 18, 2020

Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?

The discussion was led by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda, and was moderated by Dr. William Hanke. In recognition of National Skin Cancer Month, the Journal of Drugs…

Choosing Wisely: Capitalizing on Atopic Dermatitis Clinical Trial Data for Meaningful Selection of Topical Agents

By Podcast Highlights No Comments

We are finally getting what we asked for: Pharma is ponying up for head to head studies to provide us with meaningful data to help make better clinical decisions. However, these valuable projects are often with systemic agents, such as biologics, leaving topical treatments in the dust.

To address this, Dr. Lawrence Eichenfield, Professor of Dermatology and Pediatrics, UCSD, and colleagues sought to make the most out of the data we do have on the litany of topical options for atopic dermatitis and provide efficacy and safety guidance (A for effort!).

Tune in to hear what this dream team concocted about creams. Hear how an expert approaches new atopic dermatitis patients. Don’t miss out – this is all very topical.

Listen Now

You May Also Like

PhotoprotectionPodcast HighlightsSkin Cancer
September 10, 2020

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…
Podcast HighlightsSkin Cancer
September 8, 2020

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman   Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with…
AcnePodcast Highlights
August 7, 2020

Systemic Antibiotics in the Management of Acne: Issues and Considerations for Optimal Care

iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Joslyn Kirby and Adam Friedman   WEEEEEEERE BACK! Join host Dr. Adam Friedman for lively and learned discussion with Dr. Joslyn Kirby on one of the…

New Research Available Now

By JDD Highlights No Comments

The latest research in Dermatology is available online now: take a look at JDD‘s March 2020 content highlights:

View all March 2020 JDD content, including editor’s picks, supplementsCME activities, case reports, and more!

View Now

You May Also Like

Featured ArticlesJDD Highlights
August 31, 2020

View the Latest Discoveries in Aesthetics, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

The September issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on aesthetic treatments, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…
JDD Highlights
August 5, 2020

The Latest Research & Discoveries in Psoriasis, Anti-Aging, Aesthetics, and Medical Dermatology

The August issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Psoriasis, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.…
JDD HighlightsSkin of Color
June 30, 2020

View the Latest Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology Articles Now

The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.…

The Top Ten Reasons to Attend ODAC 2020 & Beyond!

By Derm Community
ODAC 2020
Connect with your colleagues at ODAC 2020

ODAC 2020 is in full swing in Orlando, Florida.

ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference (ODAC) is a ACCME accredited dermatology conference designed to meet the needs of medical and aesthetic dermatology providers in the 21st century.

Dermatologists from around the world attend ODAC to stay informed and up-to-date on clinical dermatology updates, new treatments, new uses for old treatments, new product lines, changes to therapeutic guidelines and to witness live demonstrations from the experts.

If you have been considering attending ODAC but have not yet attended the conference, here is a list of the Top Ten Reasons You Should be Attending ODAC in 2020 and Beyond!

Reason #1: Gain Fresh Practical Pearls & Real Advice

  • Gain insights from the experts on how they personally apply updates to their practice.

Reason #2: ODAC is the Perfect Blend of Medical, Aesthetic, and Surgical Dermatology

  • ODAC is the comprehensive, interactive and unique yearly dermatology conference that offers top content in a diverse, “one-stop-shop” format.

Reason #3:  Enjoy 10+ Hours of Live Demonstrations and Advanced Technique Instructions

  • Observe cutting-edge procedures and techniques with live demonstrations of new products and emerging technologies.

Reason #4:  Comprehensive Updates, Expertly Curate

  • Stay informed and updated with critical updates curated by practicing medical, surgical and aesthetic dermatology trailblazers.

Reason #5:  New Uses, Old Treatments

  • Evaluate new uses for old treatments and assess off-label uses for common dermatology conditions.

Reason #6:  Expanded Programming and Session Options

  • We’ve expanded the 2020 program to include additional expert sessions to accommodate the needs to today’s dermatology provider.

Reason #7:  Connect with Your Dermatology Community

  • Cultivate relationships with colleagues and leaders actively shaping the future of dermatology!

Reason #8:  View Clinical Trial Results

  • Review clinical trial results and discuss case-studies in both large and small group settings

Reason #9:  Discover New Diagnostic Approaches

  • Discuss the next generation of diagnostic approaches and evidence-based dermatology treatments

Reason #10:  Earn 31 AMA PRA CATEGORY 1 CREDIT(S)™

See you at ODAC!

For more information on ODAC Registration, visit www.orlandoderm.org.

Learn More

Latest Article Citations

By JDD in the Media

“Even dermatologists misdiagnose and mismanage fungal infections.”

Dermatologists face a number of obstacles when using fungal diagnostic preparations to diagnose cutaneous fungal infections.

In an article from Dermatology Times, Lisette Hilton cites findings from an August 2019 study (“Use of In-Office Preparations by Dermatologists for the Diagnosis of Cutaneous Fungal Infections“) published in the JDD that although cutaneous fungal infections account for millions of office visits per year, yet their varied presentations often lead to misdiagnosis.

“Cutaneous fungal infections account for 3.5 to 6.5 million office visits per year1 – despite being common, their diverse presentations frequently lead to misdiagnosis.2,3 In one study, only 4 out of 13 dermatophytosis cases presented were accurately identified by more than 75% of board-certified dermatologists.4 In addition, other conditions can mimic fungal infections, such as mycosis fungoides5 or inflammatory diseases including annular psoriasis, secondary syphilis, and pityriasis rosea.4″

Despite the importance of bedside fungal preparations, dermatologists’ attitudes towards and utilization of these tests are unknown. An IRB-approved survey was disseminated to the Orlando Dermatology Aesthetic and Clinical Conference (ODAC) email list and the data was collected via an internet-based platform. The survey study examined dermatologists’ perceptions of fungal preparations and identified barriers preventing their use.

Read Article Now

You May Also Like

Derm Community
June 16, 2020

A Must-Read: The Business of Dermatology

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining…
Derm CommunityODACPhotoprotectionSkin Cancer
June 1, 2020

Controversies in Photoprotection

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD is Professor and Interim Chair of Dermatology and serves as Residency Program Director, Director of Translational Research, and Director of the Supportive OncodermatologyProgram in the Department…
Derm CommunityODACSkin Cancer
May 18, 2020

Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?

The discussion was led by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda, and was moderated by Dr. William Hanke. In recognition of National Skin Cancer Month, the Journal of Drugs…