Tag

dermatology Archives - JDDonline - Journal of Drugs in Dermatology

Oral Tetracyclines and Acne: A Systematic Review for Dermatologists

By Acne, Featured Articles, The Latest No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

Oral tetracyclines are the most widely prescribed systemic antibiotic for acne. Synthesis of efficacy and safety of traditional and novel oral tetracyclines is highly informative to clinical practice. The authors conducted a systematic search of PubMed to identify large interventional and observational studies utilizing oral tetracyclines as an acne treatment.

Oral tetracyclines are the most widely prescribed systemic antibiotic for acne. Synthesis of efficacy and safety of traditional and novel oral tetracyclines is highly informative to clinical practice. The authors conducted a systematic search of PubMed to identify large interventional and observational studies utilizing oral tetracyclines as an acne treatment.

April W. Armstrong MD MPH, Joshua Hekmatjah BS, Leon H. Kircik MD

Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease affecting up to 70% of the population during their lifetime.  Cutibacterium acnes is the primary target of acne pathogenesis, and oral antibiotics, namely oral tetracyclines, have been the mainstay of systemic acne treatment for decades. In addition, oral tetracyclines possess an indirect anti-inflammatory effect against acne. Oral tetracyclines are an important part of the acne treatment regimen, and substantial evidence exists for their efficacy and safety for use in inflammatory acne.

Oral tetracyclines demonstrate bacteriostatic (inhibiting bacterial growth) effects against C. acnes; however, some tetracyclines also exhibit bacteriostatic effects on beneficial commensal organisms of the gut. This broad-spectrum effect can lead to a less diverse gut microbiome. Disruptions in the symbiotic relationship between the gut microbiome and the host have been associated with chronic diseases, such as obesity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).  Although a compositional definition of an ideal gut microbiome does not exist, greater microbial diversity is important for protection from pathogens, nutrient supply, and vitamin production.

While oral tetracyclines are widely prescribed for acne, a gap exists in synthesizing the most recent data on the efficacy and safety of these agents. We conducted a systematic review of the efficacy and safety of common oral tetracyclines (sarecycline, doxycycline, minocycline, and tetracycline) used for acne.

To determine the efficacy and safety of oral tetracyclines for acne, we followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews guidelines and performed a systematic review using PubMed and Embase. Our search included published articles from January 1960 to April 2020, and our search criteria included the following: (“Acne”[MeSH] OR “Acne Vulgaris”[MeSH]) OR “acne vulgaris/drug therapy”[MeSH Major Topic]) AND tetracyclines [MeSH Terms].

Among their many additional suggestions, the authors offer insight into financial considerations, office medical record policies and procedures, how much to stock of various emergency supplies and more.

“We are hopeful that this provides at least a template of items for consideration and implementation across the various practice situations and emergencies and mitigates the reoccurrence of difficult lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic,” they write.

Read Article Now
Articles Cited in this Post

 

Oral Tetracyclines and Acne: A Systematic Review for Dermatologists

Oral tetracyclines are the most widely prescribed systemic antibiotic for acne. Synthesis of efficacy and safety of traditional and novel oral tetracyclines is highly informative to clinical practice. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed to identify large interventional and observational studies utilizing oral tetracyclines as an acne treatment. We identified 13 articles meeting inclusion for this review, which represented 226,019 pediatric and adult acne patients. Oral tetracyclines that were included in this systematic review were sarecycline (a novel narrow-spectrum tetracycline), doxycycline, minocycline, and tetracycline. Based on shared and divergent outcome measures, different oral tetracyclines were variably effective against facial acne. Sarecycline also demonstrated efficacy in truncal acne. Members of the oral tetracycline class also differed in their ability to minimize antibiotic resistance and gut dysbiosis.
Read More

You May Also Like

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Psoriasis, The Latest | No Comments
Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…

In Support of a More Useful Definition for ‘Moderate’ Psoriasis

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Successful psoriasis treatment is dependent upon accurate assessment of disease severity; however, a recent survey indicates that dermatologists report a wide variation in cutoffs for moderate disease classification on traditional…

February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

| Acne, Aesthetics, Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like…

Sign Up To Attend Free ODAC Virtual Workshops

By Events No Comments

Dermatology Events

Events

Sign up now to attend Free ODAC Virtual 2021 Workshops

Sign up now to attend Free ODAC Virtual 2021 Workshops

The virtual ODAC conference, taking place January 14 – 17, 2021 is offering free workshops throughout the week.

Dermatologists do not need to be registered to attend ODAC to join the workshops, however, to attend, you must preregister for each session. View the workshop agenda below to save your spot.

To view the entire ODAC Conference agenda, click here.

  • In His Own Words: One Patient’s Journey with Dr. Alvaro Moreira

  • Wednesday, January 13th 7:00 PM ET
Sign Up Now
  • FDA Approved Label Expansion. Progress Your Topical Patients to the Next Step: An Oral Treatment With Data for Moderate to Severe Scalp Psoriasis with Lawrence Green, MD

  • Thursday, January 14th 7:15 PM ET
Sign Up Now
  •  ARAZLO™ Lotion: Tazarotene Redefined with Leon Kircik, MD

  • Friday, January 15th 12:00 PM ET
Sign Up Now
  • Behind the Brand – The DNA of La Roche-Posay with Adam Friedman, MD

  • Friday, January 15th 3:15 PM ET
Sign Up Now
  • Pathophysiology of Atopic Dermatitis with Marc Serota, MD, FAAD

  • Saturday, January 16th 12:00 PM ET
Sign Up Now

You May Also Like

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Psoriasis, The Latest | No Comments
Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…

In Support of a More Useful Definition for ‘Moderate’ Psoriasis

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Successful psoriasis treatment is dependent upon accurate assessment of disease severity; however, a recent survey indicates that dermatologists report a wide variation in cutoffs for moderate disease classification on traditional…

February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

| Acne, Aesthetics, Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like…

Recommendations for Preparing a Disaster Response Plan

By Aesthetics, COVID 19, Featured Articles, The Latest No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

In a paper recently published by JDD, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year.

In a paper recently published by JDD, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year.

Heather Onorati

The  suddenness with which offices closed as the COVID-19 pandemic escalated created many questions for practices. The uncertainty and inconsistencies around staffing procedures and reopening protocols added to the anxiety and emphasized the need to have proactive strategies in place for emergency situations.

In a paper recently published by JDD, Aesthetic Office Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan, several experts developed a guide based on their own experiences navigating the challenges of this past year.

“This advisory guide is meant to provide aesthetic physicians and their staff with a practical approach for practice management, staffing, supplies and inventory, and patient management,” the authors write in their paper titled “Aesthetic Office Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan.” They add that the paper does not set a standard of practice, but rather offers recommendations for various office procedures to have in place before a disaster-related event.

The experts classified their recommendations into four general areas: Practice Management; Supplies and Inventory; Office Staffing Considerations and Protocols; and Patient Management Strategies.

Among their many recommendations, they suggest creating several lists to serve as references in the event of an emergency. These include:

  • Site access lists — log-in information and passwords to social media sites and other web-based office accounts
  • Contact lists — staff contact details; office insurance policy contacts; financial institutions; colleagues who can be reached for assistance or guidance; state and national agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Federal emergency Management Agency, Department of Public Health), Department of Labor, etc.
  • Supply lists — office-related items in staff possession, inventory of general medical supplies including quantities and expiration dates

Additionally, the authors suggest pre-planning protocols for emergency staffing and office-hours as well as methods for communicating these to both staff and patients at the onset of a disaster.

“In situations of office closure or limited patient accessibility, the staff should be prepared to quickly switch to virtual access patient management tools such as telemedicine appointments,” the authors write.

Among their many additional suggestions, the authors offer insight into financial considerations, office medical record policies and procedures, how much to stock of various emergency supplies and more.

“We are hopeful that this provides at least a template of items for consideration and implementation across the various practice situations and emergencies and mitigates the reoccurrence of difficult lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic,” they write.

Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.
Articles Cited in this Post

 

Aesthetic Office Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan

The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has served as a call-to-arms in preparing practices for the next disaster whether it is another infectious disease or a flood, hurricane, earthquake, a sustained power outage, or something else. A group of predominantly core aesthetic physicians discussed the various aspects of their office procedures that warrant consideration in a proactive approach to the next pandemic/disaster-related event. This guide does not set a standard of practice but contains recommendations that may avoid some of the “lessons learned” with the COVID-19 pandemic.
Read More

You May Also Like

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Psoriasis, The Latest | No Comments
Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…

In Support of a More Useful Definition for ‘Moderate’ Psoriasis

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Successful psoriasis treatment is dependent upon accurate assessment of disease severity; however, a recent survey indicates that dermatologists report a wide variation in cutoffs for moderate disease classification on traditional…

February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

| Acne, Aesthetics, Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like…
Dermatologist looking at skin

What’s New in Dermatology – January 2021

By Featured Articles, The Latest No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

Dermatologist looking at skin

In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care moving into the future. While in other articles, investigators share findings that aim to improve disease understanding and patient care.

In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care moving into the future. While in other articles, investigators share findings that aim to improve disease understanding and patient care.

 

Heather Onorati

January always represents new beginnings. It’s the time of year we tend to reflect on the past, extract insight from experience and look toward the future with new hope and understanding. It is with this in mind that our January issue couples articles based in foresight and advances.

Groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care moving into the future. While in other articles, investigators share findings that aim to improve disease understanding and patient care.

In Aesthetic Office Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan, authors look to their shared experiences to provide suggestions for a proactive approach to manage possible future disaster-related events that could affect aesthetic practice operations and financial viability. Leveraging Virtual Boot Camp to Alleviate First Year Dermatology Resident Anxiety illustrates compelling levels of anxiety among incoming first-year dermatology residents and suggests that formally addressing the tenets of the specialty at the onset of PGY-2 can strengthen the foundation and boost the confidence of trainees. And, in Prescribing Isotretinoin for Transgender Patients: A Call to Action and Recommendations, authors discuss how the field of dermatology must remain on the leading edge of patient safety and advocacy issues and remain compassionate and adaptable when facing new patient care issues.

In the spirit of advancing understanding, other articles look to build the knowledge well around therapeutic techniques and disease treatment. As we continue toward a better understanding COVID-19, New York and Brazilian researchers examine the cutaneous presentations that could be clues to diagnosis in Presentation and Management of Cutaneous Manifestations of COVID-19. In the article Aesthetic ONE21 Technique for Injecting IncobotulinumtoxinA into the Forehead: Initial Experience With 86 Patients, authors report safety and efficacy from a single-center, retrospective study. Researchers present a clinical evaluation of a drug-device combination product for the topical treatment of molluscum contagiosum in A Phase 2 Open-Label Study to Evaluate VP-102 for the Treatment of Molluscum Contagiosum.

In addition, experts examine the impact of psychosocial stress on skin health, investigate efficacy of a nutraceutical supplement for promoting hair growth, discuss recommendations for absorbable suspension sutures in nonsurgical facial rejuvenation, and much more.

Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.
January 2021 JDD 

 

Editorials

Original Articles

Case Reports

Supplements

You May Also Like

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Psoriasis, The Latest | No Comments
Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…

In Support of a More Useful Definition for ‘Moderate’ Psoriasis

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Successful psoriasis treatment is dependent upon accurate assessment of disease severity; however, a recent survey indicates that dermatologists report a wide variation in cutoffs for moderate disease classification on traditional…

February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

| Acne, Aesthetics, Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like…

Top 10 Most Talked About Articles of 2020

By Featured Articles, The Latest No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD. And, we look forward to continuing to play a role in highlighting the benefits of the most promising treatments for your patients in the New Year.  

As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD. And, we look forward to continuing to play a role in highlighting the benefits of the most promising treatments for your patients in the New Year.  

 

Heather Onorati

The second half of 2020 has seen the world still trying to navigate and overcome the COVID-19 pandemic, and the practice of dermatology has been no exception. However, while still an area of focus, dermatologists have been reading, sharing and discussing studies about a variety of other conditions and treatments relevant to their patients.  

In our year-end topten list, we’re sharing the case studies, reviews and investigations published by the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology that have been downloaded and read the most in the past 12 months.  

 

As the world sought to understand the emerging Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), or coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), many potential signs and symptoms were investigated in connection with the virus, leading dermatologists to also grapple with identifying potentially afflicted patients. In a case study published early in the pandemic, authors in Cairo, Egypt, looked at whether a reported case of a pityriasis rosea-like rash could be connected with COVID-19. 

While COVID-19 remains a topic of interest, other issues like the use of neutraceuticals, approaches to treating melasma and hyperpigmentation, countering hair loss, and calming dermatitis have drawn attention.   

Nutrition and supplementation are topics of interest across medicine for their potential roles in overall health and wellness, including skincare. A literature review published in early 2019 examined the benefits of collagen supplementation in skin healing and anti-aging. The authors reported on a total of 11 studies that included 805 patients being treated for a range of issues from decubitus ulcers to anti-aging. In their analysis, the authors noted that collagen supplementation appeared to be promising with potential improvements in elasticity, hydration and dermal collagen density; however not all supplements are created equal and patients should be counselled with regard to ingredients and expectations, they noted. Another study that explored the use of a neutraceutical supplement for the treatment of hair loss highlighted botanical ingredients that may mitigate triggers for hair loss and help to restore balance to the follicle.   

In line with patient interest in “natural” treatments, investigators examined the mechanism of action for observed dermatologic benefits of colloidal oatmeal and found that extracts of colloidal oatmeal decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro. 

 

“Clinical evaluations showed that the colloidal oatmeal skin protectant lotion significantly improved dryness, scaling and roughness as early as 1 day after use, and these improvements were maintained over the duration of the study with continued use of the lotion,” the authors wrote. 

Among the investigations into treatments for common but challenging conditions, authors from the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, reported on a case of chronic bilateral nasolabial fold seborrheic dermatitis. They hypothesized that Crisaborole 2% ointment, a PDE4 inhibitor would reduce the inflammation. After 2 treatments per week for 4 weeks, the investigators observed a notable reduction in scaling and erythema on the treatment site.  

Another commonly seen condition, xanthelasma palpebrae, can be a significant cosmetic concern for patients. In a case study published in 2016, researchers report on a case in which they used a hyfrecator for superficial tissue destruction resulting in excellent cosmetic results, the authors showed. 

Melasma and hyperpigmentation are among the challenging conditions dermatologists see. One study still garnering attention is an investigation into the benefit of Vitamin C plus iontophoresis. Investigators observed a mean 73% improvement in abnormal pigmentation after treatment combining Vitamin C with a full-face iontophoresis mask. A mean improvement of 15.7 on the Melasma Area and Severity Index was also noted.  

A review of 10 studies examining the efficacy of retinoids and azelaic acid for the treatment of acne and subsequent post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation in skin of color reported growing evidence that retinoids are well-tolerated and could be considered as first-line therapies to treat acne people with skin of color. In addition, azelaic acid may offer improvement in both acne and hyperpigmentation, the authors noted.  

Finally, a more recent review evaluated 35 randomized controlled trials of topical agents for the treatment of melasma found strong evidence for the recommendation of cysteamine, triple combination therapy, and tranexamic acid. 

As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD. And, we look forward to continuing to play a role in highlighting the benefits of the most promising treatments for your patients in the New Year. 

Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.
Read the top 10 most discussed articles in 2020: 

 

You May Also Like

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Psoriasis, The Latest | No Comments
Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…

In Support of a More Useful Definition for ‘Moderate’ Psoriasis

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Successful psoriasis treatment is dependent upon accurate assessment of disease severity; however, a recent survey indicates that dermatologists report a wide variation in cutoffs for moderate disease classification on traditional…

February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

| Acne, Aesthetics, Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like…

Tirbanibulin Ointment 1% as a Novel Treatment for Actinic Keratosis: Phase 1 and 2 Results

By The Latest No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

Current field-directed treatments of actinic keratosis (AK), a pre-malignant condition, are often limited by severe local reactions and/or complex treatment. Tirbanibulin, a novel potent anti-proliferative synthetic agent that inhibits tubulin polymerization and Src kinase signalling, is being developed as a convenient, safe, and effective field treatment of actinic keratosis.

Read more

Current field-directed treatments of actinic keratosis (AK), a pre-malignant condition, are often limited by severe local reactions and/or complex treatment. Tirbanibulin, a novel potent anti-proliferative synthetic agent that inhibits tubulin polymerization and Src kinase signalling, is being developed as a convenient, safe, and effective field treatment of actinic keratosis.

Steven Kempers MD, Janet DuBois MD, Seth Forman MD, Amy Poon BS MA, Eva Cutler BS BA, Hui Wang PhD, David Cutler MD FRCP(C), Jane Fang MD, Rudolf Kwan MBBS MRCP

 

Actinic keratosis (AK) is a pre-malignant condition, associated with prolonged ultraviolet damage predominantly on the face/scalp, trunk, and extremities. AK affects ~58 million individuals in the US, and typically occurs in males, fair-skinned individuals, and those of advancing age. As the progression of AK to invasive squamous cell carcinoma (iSCC) is unpredictable, the generally accepted approach is to treat all AK.

Current treatments are lesion- or field-directed therapies. Lesion-directed therapies are used when the lesion burden is low; but these modalities can cause scarring and long-term pigmentary changes. Field-directed therapies are used to treat multiple lesions, large areas, and subclinical lesions.

Commonly used topical treatments, while effective, frequently cause moderate-to-severe application-site reactions and deleterious effects on uninvolved skin, which are often considered unacceptable to patients. Moreover, many of these treatments have lengthy or cumbersome dosing regimens that may undermine treatment compliance and compromise efficacy.

Given the disadvantages of available topical therapies, there is a need to develop an agent that has low potential for severe local reactions, effective AK clearance, and convenient dosing.

Read Full Article Now
Article Cited in this Post

You May Also Like

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Psoriasis, The Latest | No Comments
Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…

In Support of a More Useful Definition for ‘Moderate’ Psoriasis

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Successful psoriasis treatment is dependent upon accurate assessment of disease severity; however, a recent survey indicates that dermatologists report a wide variation in cutoffs for moderate disease classification on traditional…

February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

| Acne, Aesthetics, Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like…

Time Intervals Until the First Return Office Visit After New Medications

By Featured Articles No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

Making contact with patients within a week of prescribing a new medication may improve treatment adherence, suggest the authors of a recent study.

Read more

Making contact with patients within a week of prescribing a new medication may improve treatment adherence, suggest the authors of a recent study.

Heather Onorati

Making contact with patients within a week of prescribing a new medication may improve treatment adherence, suggest the authors of a recent study.

In patients with acne, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, specifically, poor adherence to topical treatments has been a common challenge, according to studies. One reported reason is dissatisfaction with treatment efficacy. Closing the gap between prescription and follow-up visit may encourage patients to fill prescriptions sooner; initial efficacy may motivate further compliance, according to the study.

“Shortening the time to the first return visit may make doing the treatment appear to be less burdensome,” write Steven R. Feldman, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues.

The group analyzed data representing 10.9 million estimated visits that were logged in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and represented diagnoses for acne, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis between the years 2014 and 2016, which was the most recent available data. The time to a first return visit for patients with acne, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis who were prescribed at least one new medication was often more than two months regardless of whether they were prescribed a new medication.

Whether reasons for scheduling long intervals are due to tradition or unawareness of more optimal timeframes is not well known, the authors write.

Previous studies have indicated that adherence increases around the time of an office visit and then decreases rapidly in the days afterward, they note. Physicians may be able to use this tendency to create accountability for patients to begin and continue treatments.

“If a decreased interval between office visits can improve initial adherence, patients may see greater efficacy when using medications and be encouraged to continue their treatments,” the authors write.

While in-person follow-up visits may not be feasible for all patients due to travel distance, cost or other barriers, the authors note other methods of contacting and engaging the patient that have been shown to improve adherence, such as phone calls, emails, text messages and telemedicine visits.

“A lack of accountability may be an underappreciated component of non-adherence,” the authors write. “The timing of return visits may be an important factor to consider … for overcoming the adherence hurdle.”

Read Full Article Now
Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.
Article Cited in this Post

You May Also Like

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Psoriasis, The Latest | No Comments
Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…

In Support of a More Useful Definition for ‘Moderate’ Psoriasis

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Successful psoriasis treatment is dependent upon accurate assessment of disease severity; however, a recent survey indicates that dermatologists report a wide variation in cutoffs for moderate disease classification on traditional…

February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

| Acne, Aesthetics, Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like…

Clinical Benefits of Circadian-based Antioxidant Protection and Repair

By Featured Articles, The Latest No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

Skin activities follow endogenous circadian rhythms resulting in differences between daytime and nighttime properties. To address the variations in skin needs, a novel circadian-based dual serum system (LVS) was developed.

Read more

Skin activities follow endogenous circadian rhythms resulting in differences between daytime and nighttime properties. To address the variations in skin needs, a novel circadian-based dual serum system (LVS) was developed.

Zoe Diana Draelos, Elizabeth T Makino, Kuniko Kadoya, Audrey Nguyen, Lily I Jiang, Rahul C Mehta 

 

The concept of human body rhythms has been popularized as important in overall body health. These rhythms are characterized as fluctuations in mental, physical, and emotional well-being based on the clock. These fluctuations are related to the day/night cycle, hormones, meals, sleep/wake cycle, adrenal gland production, thyroid gland, and clock genes.

The study of the body circadian rhythm is known as chronobiology with studies of the body’s inner clock dating back to the 18th century. There are three types of chronobiology rhythms: infradian rhythms, ultraradian rhythms, and circadian rhythms. Infradian rhythms last more than 24 hours and are repeated only every few days, weeks, or months representing such activities as female menses. Ultradian rhythms are shorter than 24 hours and often last several hours, such as ingestion of food. Finally, circadian rhythms last 24 hours with distinctive day/night cycles.

Circadian rhythms are endogenous and adjusted to the local environment by cues call zeitgebers, meaning “time giver” in German. The 2017 Nobel prize in physiology or medicine was awarded for research in molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythms in fruit flies. In humans, the circadian clock is in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, located in the hypothalamus. Information is transmitted to the suprachiasmatic nucleus via the retina that contains specialized photosensitive ganglion cells. PER1 and PER2 genes are expressed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus representing the primary circadian pacemaker in the human brain. These circadian rhythms are also important in the skin with robust autonomic clocks in keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, mast cells, and hair follicles.

Important skin functions affected by circadian rhythms include free radical production and neutralization, DNA damage and repair, keratinocyte/fibroblast differentiation and proliferation, and barrier and immune functioning. Direct and indirect antioxidant protection play an important role in supporting these circadian rhythm skin functions.

Read Full Article Now
Article Cited in this Post

You May Also Like

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Psoriasis, The Latest | No Comments
Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…

In Support of a More Useful Definition for ‘Moderate’ Psoriasis

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Successful psoriasis treatment is dependent upon accurate assessment of disease severity; however, a recent survey indicates that dermatologists report a wide variation in cutoffs for moderate disease classification on traditional…

February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

| Acne, Aesthetics, Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

By Featured Articles No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been rising.

Read more

Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been rising.

Franchesca D. Choi BS RPh, Calvin T. Sung BS, Margit L.W. Juhasz MD, Natasha Atanaskova Mesinkovska MD PhD

 

 In 2016, the collagen market was valued at an estimated 3.71 billion USD and is projected to reach 6.63 billion USD by 2025. Collagen supplements, originating from various sources (eg, porcine, bovine, marine) and available in numerous formulations (eg, protein, gelatin, hydrolysate, peptides), are marketed as improving skin integrity and modulating skin aging. However, even with this increase in patient interest and market share, the use of collagen supplementation in dermatology remains controversial due to the lack of regulation on quality and quantity of ingredients in over-the-counter collagen supplements, as well as minimal peer-reviewed literature on the subject.

Fortunately, there are increasing numbers of clinical studies regarding potential effects of collagen-based dietary supplements on skin. Collagen is the most abundant component of the extracellular matrix constituting 75% of skin’s dry weight.5 Qualitative and quantitative decline in collagen is associated with cutaneous aging.6 Collagen protein is a right-handed triple helix of parallel polypeptides where every third amino acid residue is glycine (Gly) resulting in X-Y-Gly triplets, where X andY are frequently proline (Pro) and 4-hydroxyproline (Hyp; an amino acid sub- unit unique to collagen), respectively,7 making Pro-Hyp-Gly the most common amino acid triplet unit found in collagen

Native, animal collagen can be extracted from connective tissue in various forms.10 When denatured by heat, collagen forms gelatin, which has been used for centuries as a food source and traditional medicine in Europe and China.

Further enzymatic hydrolysis of gelatin produces collagen hydrolysates (CH) composed of peptides of varying lengths. CH has a lower molecular weight than gelatin, higher water-solubility, and no gelation properties at ambient temperatures, allowing CH to be conveniently formulated into liquid drinks and jelly sticks for oral consumption. In the past decade, CHs have gained popularity as a nutraceutical supplement.

Read Full Article Now
Article Cited in this Post

You May Also Like

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Psoriasis, The Latest | No Comments
Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…

In Support of a More Useful Definition for ‘Moderate’ Psoriasis

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Successful psoriasis treatment is dependent upon accurate assessment of disease severity; however, a recent survey indicates that dermatologists report a wide variation in cutoffs for moderate disease classification on traditional…

February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

| Acne, Aesthetics, Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like…

Starting Your Own Dermatology Practice: Expert Panel Discussion

By JDD Webinars No Comments

JDD Multimedia

Video Pearls

In this exclusive Webcast, expert panelists discuss their experiences with securing financing, choosing devices, hiring contractors and running a practice. They also provide insights into what they wish they knew before beginning their practice, offer practical tips and much more!

 

Supported by

Starting Your Own Dermatology Practice

Expert Panel Discussion

ODAC in partnership with the JDD, invite you to join your dermatology colleagues as we discuss strategies, steps and best practices for starting your own dermatology practice.
In this exclusive Webcast, expert panelists discuss their experiences with securing financing, choosing devices, hiring contractors and running a practice. They also provide insights into what they wish they knew before beginning their practice, offer practical tips and much more!

 

View on Demand Now

MODERATOR

  • Aanand N. Geria, MD, FAAD (Founder, Geria Dermatology – Rutherford, NJ)

PANELISTS

  • Matthew J. Elias, DO, FAAD (Co-Founder, Elias Dermatology – Fort Lauderdale, FL)
  • Rishi K. Gandhi, MD, FAAD (CEO & Director, Ohio Skin Surgery and Cosmetic Center – Dayton, OH)
  • Chesahna Kindred, MD, MBA, FAAD (Founder, Kindred Hair & Skin Center – Columbia, MD)
  • Omar N. Qutub, MD FAAD (Founder, Dermatology By Design LLC – Portland, OR)

View more on-demand webcasts from the JDD.

JDD Webinars

You May Also Like

Perspectives on Managing Moderate-to-Severe Atopic Dermatitis

| Podcast | No Comments
The Ps of Lichen Planus got nothing on this alliteration filled podcast that was purposefully positioned to perfect your practice prowess to punish the pruritus and picking of AD. Join…

Oral Antibiotics for Acne: Basic Concepts & Practical Considerations

| Atopic Dermatitis, Podcast Highlights | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mahmoud Ghannoum, Emmy Graber & Adam Friedman   Antibiotic use for inflammatory skin diseases is a staple in dermatology. Like milk is the answer…

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Psoriasis, The Latest | No Comments
Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…

A Must-Read: The Business of Dermatology

By Derm Community No Comments

Dermatology News

Derm Community

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining a practice.

Learn More

The Business of Dermatology

Review by Omer Ibrahim, MD

Business intellect, a vital aspect of managing a practice, is not taught in residency. From the infancy of their training, dermatologists are trained to think broadly and scrupulously, using each clue, each corporeal sense, and each available tool to accurately diagnose and manage a plethora of cutaneous conditions. After residency, dermatologists set out armed with the knowledge and drive to deliver expert care to their future patients. However, despite their education and best intentions, lack of business acumen can hinder even the brightest and most motivated of practitioners. In order to enlighten oneself in the complicated field of business management, clinicians are left to fend for themselves, often learning as they go, sometimes making unnecessary mistakes, and adjusting their business practices reactively. Retrospective “trial and error” learning is time-consuming, cumbersome, and costly. Why not short track and get the goods without the trial and error, making costly mistakes and taking years. The new book, The Business of Dermatology is a cornerstone achievement in the standardization of business education for dermatologists.

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining a practice. To start, the power of this textbook fundamentally lies in the experience and scope of its authorship.

The authors were hand-selected by the editors ensuring that each chapter was written by a tried and true expert in that subject. Unlike other textbooks in the field of business management and administration that are primarily written by individuals from the business world, some of whom have no insight into the inner machinations of the medical world, or hands-on experience, the authors of this book are well-known, respected dermatologists that hail from thriving practices of their own. The reader has an unprecedented opportunity to learn from the firsthand experiences of top authorities who live and breathe dermatology. Using conversational prose, the authors depict their experiences, trials, and errors, employing specific real-world examples and scenarios while tackling each subject.

A notable forte of The Business of Dermatology is the sheer breadth and range of topics discussed in the textbook by medical as well as surgical dermatologists. Opening and managing a practice is a daunting endeavor with twists, turns, and hidden hurdles that one cannot foresee until stumbling across them. The Business of Dermatology unveils those twists, turns, and hurdles for the reader, taking the “guessing game” out of the equation. Fifty-five chapters elucidate every aspect of running a practice, covering all practice-relevant topics, including office space and equipment, managing financials, diverse practice models, human resources, employment considerations, patient issues, pricing, essential surgical tools/supplies, marketing, and much more. The Business of Dermatology lays bare every facet of handling a dermatologic practice, so much so that even a well-run, seasoned practice stands to learn new tools and tips to elevate itself to a higher level.

And now more than ever in the “Time of Covid” we are in desperate need of information from The Business of Dermatology. Many of us are inventing the wheel with the significant changes that are occurring in Dermatology, and the practice of our specialty.

The wealth of knowledge endowed in each chapter is written and formatted in such a style that renders each chapter extremely easy to read and comprehend. First, the prose used in the chapters is conversational – as such, the reader is fully immersed in each topic as if he/she were having a face-to-face chat with the authors. Furthermore, references are used only when absolutely necessary. The reader is not bogged down by superfluous references and discussions that may dim the vital discussion points of the chapters. Finally, embedded within each chapter are practical tips that are immediately implementable and a Top Ten list that highlights the key take-home points, making “reading on the run” possible. The novice practice owner need not fear the residency dogma of “trying to drink from a gushing fire hydrant” with this easy-to-read, catchy and focused textbook.

And now more than ever in the “Time of Covid” we are in desperate need of information from The Business of Dermatology. Many of us are inventing the wheel with the significant changes that are occurring in Dermatology, and the practice of our specialty.

The wealth of knowledge endowed in each chapter is written and formatted in such a style that renders each chapter extremely easy to read and comprehend. First, the prose used in the chapters is conversational – as such, the reader is fully immersed in each topic as if he/she were having a face-to-face chat with the authors. Furthermore, references are used only when absolutely necessary. The reader is not bogged down by superfluous references and discussions that may dim the vital discussion points of the chapters. Finally, embedded within each chapter are practical tips that are immediately implementable and a Top Ten list that highlights the key take-home points, making “reading on the run” possible. The novice practice owner need not fear the residency dogma of “trying to drink from a gushing fire hydrant” with this easy-to-read, catchy and focused textbook.

With a vast wealth of information relevant to the business side of a dermatology practice, this remarkable resource fills the gap between the training phase and acquisition of professional confidence. Every dermatologist, whether early in their career or well-seasoned, or in a solo practice or a large group, will benefit from this textbook. At a price of $89.99, The Business of Dermatology is affordable and accessible online and in-print – the 350 chapter pages of business wisdom are worth every cent. (And at $64.99 you can access just the digital version.)

Get Your Copy Today

The Business of Dermatology by Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla

 

You May Also Like

AestheticsFeatured ArticlesPsoriasisThe Latest
February 24, 2021

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…
Featured ArticlesThe Latest
February 24, 2021

In Support of a More Useful Definition for ‘Moderate’ Psoriasis

Successful psoriasis treatment is dependent upon accurate assessment of disease severity; however, a recent survey indicates that dermatologists report a wide variation in cutoffs for moderate disease classification on traditional…
AcneAestheticsFeatured ArticlesJDD Highlights
February 3, 2021

February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like…

GW Survey Evaluates Influence of Social Media in Attracting Patients

By Featured Articles No Comments

Dermatology News

Featured Article

“A rapidly growing number of dermatologists are advocating for the value of social media to promote their practices,” said Adam Friedman, MD, interim chair of the Department of Dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences and senior author on the study. “Only one other survey has been conducted on patient perception of social media. There hasn’t been enough to show us how effective social media is as a marketing tool for dermatologists.”

Read Article Now

GW Survey Evaluates Influence of Social Media in Attracting Patients

A survey from the George Washington University evaluated whether patients consider a dermatologist’s social media presence when looking for a doctor

WASHINGTON (May 7, 2020) – Patients often do not take social media into consideration when looking for a dermatologist, according to a survey from researchers at the George Washington University. The survey was published recently in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.

As of 2019, 79% of Americans have a social media presence on platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Many dermatologists consider social media to be a useful tool for building their practices and recruiting patients. However, limited data exists about whether a provider’s social media presence is a driver in attracting new patients to their practice.

“A rapidly growing number of dermatologists are advocating for the value of social media to promote their practices,” said Adam Friedman, MD, interim chair of the Department of Dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences and senior author on the study. “Only one other survey has been conducted on patient perception of social media. There hasn’t been enough to show us how effective social media is as a marketing tool for dermatologists.”

The GW research team distributed a 10-question online survey to a diverse patient population to evaluate their perceptions of social media and what aspects of a dermatologist’s site are the most helpful. Only 25% of respondents aged 18–30 years old thought social media was extremely or very important, suggesting that leaning on social media may not be the best way to grow a practice.

The results also indicated that respondents who did utilize social media for these purposes were interested in seeing patient education, viewing patient reviews, as well as dermatologists’ experience levels rather than personal information.

“While patients overall may not rely on social media to select a dermatologist nor be interested in nonmedical content, many of our respondents did express interest in educational content written by their dermatologists on social media,” Friedman said. “Practitioners should still count social media as a tool in building their practices and engaging their current patients, however, it should be one of many methods that they rely on to recruit new patients.”

The authors say that further research needs to be done to determine whether social media is an effective educational tool for dermatologists.

Read Article Now

You May Also Like

AestheticsFeatured ArticlesPsoriasisThe Latest
February 24, 2021

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…
Featured ArticlesThe Latest
February 24, 2021

In Support of a More Useful Definition for ‘Moderate’ Psoriasis

Successful psoriasis treatment is dependent upon accurate assessment of disease severity; however, a recent survey indicates that dermatologists report a wide variation in cutoffs for moderate disease classification on traditional…
AcneAestheticsFeatured ArticlesJDD Highlights
February 3, 2021

February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like…