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What’s New in Dermatology – January 2021

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In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care moving into the future. While in other articles, investigators share findings that aim to improve disease understanding and patient care.

In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care moving into the future. While in other articles, investigators share findings that aim to improve disease understanding and patient care.

 

Heather Onorati

January always represents new beginnings. It’s the time of year we tend to reflect on the past, extract insight from experience and look toward the future with new hope and understanding. It is with this in mind that our January issue couples articles based in foresight and advances.

Groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care moving into the future. While in other articles, investigators share findings that aim to improve disease understanding and patient care.

In Aesthetic Office Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan, authors look to their shared experiences to provide suggestions for a proactive approach to manage possible future disaster-related events that could affect aesthetic practice operations and financial viability. Leveraging Virtual Boot Camp to Alleviate First Year Dermatology Resident Anxiety illustrates compelling levels of anxiety among incoming first-year dermatology residents and suggests that formally addressing the tenets of the specialty at the onset of PGY-2 can strengthen the foundation and boost the confidence of trainees. And, in Prescribing Isotretinoin for Transgender Patients: A Call to Action and Recommendations, authors discuss how the field of dermatology must remain on the leading edge of patient safety and advocacy issues and remain compassionate and adaptable when facing new patient care issues.

In the spirit of advancing understanding, other articles look to build the knowledge well around therapeutic techniques and disease treatment. As we continue toward a better understanding COVID-19, New York and Brazilian researchers examine the cutaneous presentations that could be clues to diagnosis in Presentation and Management of Cutaneous Manifestations of COVID-19. In the article Aesthetic ONE21 Technique for Injecting IncobotulinumtoxinA into the Forehead: Initial Experience With 86 Patients, authors report safety and efficacy from a single-center, retrospective study. Researchers present a clinical evaluation of a drug-device combination product for the topical treatment of molluscum contagiosum in A Phase 2 Open-Label Study to Evaluate VP-102 for the Treatment of Molluscum Contagiosum.

In addition, experts examine the impact of psychosocial stress on skin health, investigate efficacy of a nutraceutical supplement for promoting hair growth, discuss recommendations for absorbable suspension sutures in nonsurgical facial rejuvenation, and much more.

Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.
January 2021 JDD 

 

Editorials

Original Articles

Case Reports

Supplements

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Top 10 Most Talked About Articles of 2020

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As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD. And, we look forward to continuing to play a role in highlighting the benefits of the most promising treatments for your patients in the New Year.  

As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD. And, we look forward to continuing to play a role in highlighting the benefits of the most promising treatments for your patients in the New Year.  

 

Heather Onorati

The second half of 2020 has seen the world still trying to navigate and overcome the COVID-19 pandemic, and the practice of dermatology has been no exception. However, while still an area of focus, dermatologists have been reading, sharing and discussing studies about a variety of other conditions and treatments relevant to their patients.  

In our year-end topten list, we’re sharing the case studies, reviews and investigations published by the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology that have been downloaded and read the most in the past 12 months.  

 

As the world sought to understand the emerging Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), or coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), many potential signs and symptoms were investigated in connection with the virus, leading dermatologists to also grapple with identifying potentially afflicted patients. In a case study published early in the pandemic, authors in Cairo, Egypt, looked at whether a reported case of a pityriasis rosea-like rash could be connected with COVID-19. 

While COVID-19 remains a topic of interest, other issues like the use of neutraceuticals, approaches to treating melasma and hyperpigmentation, countering hair loss, and calming dermatitis have drawn attention.   

Nutrition and supplementation are topics of interest across medicine for their potential roles in overall health and wellness, including skincare. A literature review published in early 2019 examined the benefits of collagen supplementation in skin healing and anti-aging. The authors reported on a total of 11 studies that included 805 patients being treated for a range of issues from decubitus ulcers to anti-aging. In their analysis, the authors noted that collagen supplementation appeared to be promising with potential improvements in elasticity, hydration and dermal collagen density; however not all supplements are created equal and patients should be counselled with regard to ingredients and expectations, they noted. Another study that explored the use of a neutraceutical supplement for the treatment of hair loss highlighted botanical ingredients that may mitigate triggers for hair loss and help to restore balance to the follicle.   

In line with patient interest in “natural” treatments, investigators examined the mechanism of action for observed dermatologic benefits of colloidal oatmeal and found that extracts of colloidal oatmeal decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro. 

 

“Clinical evaluations showed that the colloidal oatmeal skin protectant lotion significantly improved dryness, scaling and roughness as early as 1 day after use, and these improvements were maintained over the duration of the study with continued use of the lotion,” the authors wrote. 

Among the investigations into treatments for common but challenging conditions, authors from the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, reported on a case of chronic bilateral nasolabial fold seborrheic dermatitis. They hypothesized that Crisaborole 2% ointment, a PDE4 inhibitor would reduce the inflammation. After 2 treatments per week for 4 weeks, the investigators observed a notable reduction in scaling and erythema on the treatment site.  

Another commonly seen condition, xanthelasma palpebrae, can be a significant cosmetic concern for patients. In a case study published in 2016, researchers report on a case in which they used a hyfrecator for superficial tissue destruction resulting in excellent cosmetic results, the authors showed. 

Melasma and hyperpigmentation are among the challenging conditions dermatologists see. One study still garnering attention is an investigation into the benefit of Vitamin C plus iontophoresis. Investigators observed a mean 73% improvement in abnormal pigmentation after treatment combining Vitamin C with a full-face iontophoresis mask. A mean improvement of 15.7 on the Melasma Area and Severity Index was also noted.  

A review of 10 studies examining the efficacy of retinoids and azelaic acid for the treatment of acne and subsequent post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation in skin of color reported growing evidence that retinoids are well-tolerated and could be considered as first-line therapies to treat acne people with skin of color. In addition, azelaic acid may offer improvement in both acne and hyperpigmentation, the authors noted.  

Finally, a more recent review evaluated 35 randomized controlled trials of topical agents for the treatment of melasma found strong evidence for the recommendation of cysteamine, triple combination therapy, and tranexamic acid. 

As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD. And, we look forward to continuing to play a role in highlighting the benefits of the most promising treatments for your patients in the New Year. 

Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.
Read the top 10 most discussed articles in 2020: 

 

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Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been rising.

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Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been rising.

Franchesca D. Choi BS RPh, Calvin T. Sung BS, Margit L.W. Juhasz MD, Natasha Atanaskova Mesinkovska MD PhD

 

 In 2016, the collagen market was valued at an estimated 3.71 billion USD and is projected to reach 6.63 billion USD by 2025. Collagen supplements, originating from various sources (eg, porcine, bovine, marine) and available in numerous formulations (eg, protein, gelatin, hydrolysate, peptides), are marketed as improving skin integrity and modulating skin aging. However, even with this increase in patient interest and market share, the use of collagen supplementation in dermatology remains controversial due to the lack of regulation on quality and quantity of ingredients in over-the-counter collagen supplements, as well as minimal peer-reviewed literature on the subject.

Fortunately, there are increasing numbers of clinical studies regarding potential effects of collagen-based dietary supplements on skin. Collagen is the most abundant component of the extracellular matrix constituting 75% of skin’s dry weight.5 Qualitative and quantitative decline in collagen is associated with cutaneous aging.6 Collagen protein is a right-handed triple helix of parallel polypeptides where every third amino acid residue is glycine (Gly) resulting in X-Y-Gly triplets, where X andY are frequently proline (Pro) and 4-hydroxyproline (Hyp; an amino acid sub- unit unique to collagen), respectively,7 making Pro-Hyp-Gly the most common amino acid triplet unit found in collagen

Native, animal collagen can be extracted from connective tissue in various forms.10 When denatured by heat, collagen forms gelatin, which has been used for centuries as a food source and traditional medicine in Europe and China.

Further enzymatic hydrolysis of gelatin produces collagen hydrolysates (CH) composed of peptides of varying lengths. CH has a lower molecular weight than gelatin, higher water-solubility, and no gelation properties at ambient temperatures, allowing CH to be conveniently formulated into liquid drinks and jelly sticks for oral consumption. In the past decade, CHs have gained popularity as a nutraceutical supplement.

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800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin.

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Improvements in skin health is a well-researched benefit of taking collagen – in fact, according to a January 2019 Journal of Drugs in Dermatology study, (recently featured in an Every Day Health article, ” 8 Potential Benefits of Collagen – and 1 Thing it Can’t Do”), 800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin.

Franchesca D. Choi BS RPh, Calvin T. Sung BS, Margit L.W. Juhasz MD, Natasha Atanaskova Mesinkovska MD PhD

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In 2016, the collagen market was valued at an estimated 3.71 billion USD and is projected to reach 6.63 billion USD by 2025. Collagen supplements, originating from various sources (eg, porcine, bovine, marine) and available in numerous formulations (eg, protein, gelatin, hydrolysate, peptides), are marketed as improving skin integrity and modulating skin aging.

However, even with this increase in patient interest and market share, the use of collagen supplementation in dermatology remains controversial due to the lack of regulation on quality and quantity of ingredients in over-the-counter collagen supplements, as well as minimal peer-reviewed literature on the subject. Fortunately, there are increasing numbers of clinical studies regarding potential effects of collagen-based dietary supplements on skin.

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