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February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

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Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like acne as well as anti-aging.

Read the February JDD Now

Acne, Anti-Aging, Aesthetics, Psoriasis, and more

by Heather Onorati

February marks a transition period from the month of new beginnings (January) to a month of advancement (March). In many ways our collective focus is shifting. With new vaccines now rolling out, there has been a shift in the pandemic; our national leadership has shifted; our seasons are transitioning (with many on the East Coast looking forward to warmer days ahead). It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like acne as well as anti-aging. Here’s a glimpse into the findings reported this month:

Article Highlights

  • As we age, the body’s ability to manage inflammation decreases due to a gradual increase in pro-inflammatory systemic cytokines that result in chronic, low-grade inflammation, termed “inflammaging”. This is thought to play a role in many age-related chronic conditions like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, certain cancers and Alzheimer’s disease. Other studies suggest the human microbiome also may play a role in inflammaging. In “Inflammaging in Dermatology: A New Frontier for Research,” researchers examine inflammaging within the context of the skin microbiome and its impact on chronic disease. The authors write that the skin, our largest organ, may be responsible for a larger role in promoting or preventing inflammaging.

  • Psoriasis is a condition continually studied as it has such a significant impact on patients and their quality of life. While many advances have been made, researchers continue to exam ways in which clinicians can improve treatment and disease management for these patients. In “Hospitalization in Patients With Psoriasis: Impact of Biological Therapies on Temporal Evolution,” researchers recognized the need to improve understanding of the impact of biological therapies on hospitalization. They retrospectively collected data on patients diagnosed with psoriasis within one institution who had at least one hospital admission during the study period. They established methods to compare hospitalizations at specified time periods since the evolution of biological therapies. While their data point to a gradual decrease in average hospitalization rate since 2004, they advise that there have been no extensive data to evaluate the impact of biological therapies on patient hospitalization.

  • In another recently published study, “Dermatologists’ Perspectives on Defining Moderate Psoriasis: The Canadian Moderate Psoriasis Survey,” researchers noted that there is a need to more fully define what constitutes “moderate plaque psoriasis” in order to improve care. In their survey of 69 responding Canadian dermatologists, the authors found that body surface area was used most commonly by respondents to describe disease severity. And, many consider disease location to be an indicator of severity.

  • Another skin condition that causes significant social and psychosocial distress is acne. As oral antibiotics are among the most commonly used systemic treatment, their use may be limited by potential side effects, according to the authors of “Differences in Depression and Distress Between Acne Patients on Isotretinoin vs Oral Antibiotics”. While isotretinoin is one of the most effective therapies, the authors note its potential side effects as well as controversy around its association with depression and suicidal ideation.

    “A critical knowledge gap exists in defining the association between systemic anti-acne treatments and mental health outcomes,” the authors write. To explore this further, they examined the differences in mental health outcomes between patients treated with isotretinoin vs oral antibiotics and found that patients treated with isotretinoin experiences less psychosocial distress and symptoms related to depression compared with those patients treated with oral antibiotics.

  • And, since antimicrobial resistance continues to be a concern, physicians need to weigh this risk when considering treatments for patients with various skin infections. In “Do Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns Matter? An Algorithm for the Treatment of Patients With Impetigo,” a group of experts used a modified Delphi technique to develop a treatment algorithm to guide clinicians in the treatment of children and adults with impetigo.

    The authors conducted a systematic literature review of recommendations for the current practice of impetigo treatment, which included research studies, clinical guidelines, consensus papers, and reviews published between 2014 and February 2020.  They developed a step-by-step method to standardize and support clinical decision making, they write, which includes guidance for education and prevention, diagnosis and classification, treatment measures and follow-up. In addition, they discuss a newer topical antibiotic that appears to be safe and effective.

    “The panel recognized that doctors need education in antibiotic stewardship principles, as, for some of them, it is an unknown field,” the authors write.

  • And finally, in an ongoing effort to better understand the impact of COVID-19 in the dermatology setting, researchers in one study reported that patients found teledermatology appointments to be a convenient and effective alternative to in-person visits during the pandemic. While the lack of physical touch and inability to provide close inspection can be frustrating for patients, this can be overcome by appropriate patient selection, the authors report in Patient Perceptions and Satisfaction With Teledermatology During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Survey-Based Study.

  • Another impact of pandemic restrictions on the dermatology setting is the interaction between dermatologists and pharmaceutical company representatives, who often provide clinicians with educational information on drugs as well as samples for patients. In “The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Physician-Pharmaceutical Office-Based Interactions,” researchers examined the changing dynamic in the format of visits with and access to physicians by pharmaceutical representatives.

Editor's Picks

These articles and more make up this month’s February issue. Read more on aging, melasma and skin cancer in these articles also included:

  • Efficacy and Tolerability of a Novel Topical Treatment for the Neck: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Regimen-Controlled Study
  • New Protocol for Long-Term Results With a Multi-Pulse Nd:YAG Laser for Melasma Treatment: A Descriptive Cohort Study
  • A Review of Hedgehog Inhibitors Sonidegib and Vismodegib for Treatment of Advanced Basal Cell Carcinoma
  • Ingenol Mebutate as Treatment of Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Situ: A Case Series
  • Intralesional 5-Fluorouracil for Treatment of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer: A Systematic Review
 
 

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Dermatologist looking at skin

What’s New in Dermatology – January 2021

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Featured Article

Featured Article

Dermatologist looking at skin

In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care moving into the future. While in other articles, investigators share findings that aim to improve disease understanding and patient care.

In the January 2021 issue of the JDD, groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care moving into the future. While in other articles, investigators share findings that aim to improve disease understanding and patient care.

 

Heather Onorati

January always represents new beginnings. It’s the time of year we tend to reflect on the past, extract insight from experience and look toward the future with new hope and understanding. It is with this in mind that our January issue couples articles based in foresight and advances.

Groups of experts reflect on lessons learned this year in several articles offering guidance and recommendations for practice management and patient care moving into the future. While in other articles, investigators share findings that aim to improve disease understanding and patient care.

In Aesthetic Office Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan, authors look to their shared experiences to provide suggestions for a proactive approach to manage possible future disaster-related events that could affect aesthetic practice operations and financial viability. Leveraging Virtual Boot Camp to Alleviate First Year Dermatology Resident Anxiety illustrates compelling levels of anxiety among incoming first-year dermatology residents and suggests that formally addressing the tenets of the specialty at the onset of PGY-2 can strengthen the foundation and boost the confidence of trainees. And, in Prescribing Isotretinoin for Transgender Patients: A Call to Action and Recommendations, authors discuss how the field of dermatology must remain on the leading edge of patient safety and advocacy issues and remain compassionate and adaptable when facing new patient care issues.

In the spirit of advancing understanding, other articles look to build the knowledge well around therapeutic techniques and disease treatment. As we continue toward a better understanding COVID-19, New York and Brazilian researchers examine the cutaneous presentations that could be clues to diagnosis in Presentation and Management of Cutaneous Manifestations of COVID-19. In the article Aesthetic ONE21 Technique for Injecting IncobotulinumtoxinA into the Forehead: Initial Experience With 86 Patients, authors report safety and efficacy from a single-center, retrospective study. Researchers present a clinical evaluation of a drug-device combination product for the topical treatment of molluscum contagiosum in A Phase 2 Open-Label Study to Evaluate VP-102 for the Treatment of Molluscum Contagiosum.

In addition, experts examine the impact of psychosocial stress on skin health, investigate efficacy of a nutraceutical supplement for promoting hair growth, discuss recommendations for absorbable suspension sutures in nonsurgical facial rejuvenation, and much more.

Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.
January 2021 JDD 

 

Editorials

Original Articles

Case Reports

Supplements

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February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

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Top 10 Most Talked About Articles of 2020

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Featured Article

Featured Article

As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD. And, we look forward to continuing to play a role in highlighting the benefits of the most promising treatments for your patients in the New Year.  

As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD. And, we look forward to continuing to play a role in highlighting the benefits of the most promising treatments for your patients in the New Year.  

 

Heather Onorati

The second half of 2020 has seen the world still trying to navigate and overcome the COVID-19 pandemic, and the practice of dermatology has been no exception. However, while still an area of focus, dermatologists have been reading, sharing and discussing studies about a variety of other conditions and treatments relevant to their patients.  

In our year-end topten list, we’re sharing the case studies, reviews and investigations published by the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology that have been downloaded and read the most in the past 12 months.  

 

As the world sought to understand the emerging Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), or coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), many potential signs and symptoms were investigated in connection with the virus, leading dermatologists to also grapple with identifying potentially afflicted patients. In a case study published early in the pandemic, authors in Cairo, Egypt, looked at whether a reported case of a pityriasis rosea-like rash could be connected with COVID-19. 

While COVID-19 remains a topic of interest, other issues like the use of neutraceuticals, approaches to treating melasma and hyperpigmentation, countering hair loss, and calming dermatitis have drawn attention.   

Nutrition and supplementation are topics of interest across medicine for their potential roles in overall health and wellness, including skincare. A literature review published in early 2019 examined the benefits of collagen supplementation in skin healing and anti-aging. The authors reported on a total of 11 studies that included 805 patients being treated for a range of issues from decubitus ulcers to anti-aging. In their analysis, the authors noted that collagen supplementation appeared to be promising with potential improvements in elasticity, hydration and dermal collagen density; however not all supplements are created equal and patients should be counselled with regard to ingredients and expectations, they noted. Another study that explored the use of a neutraceutical supplement for the treatment of hair loss highlighted botanical ingredients that may mitigate triggers for hair loss and help to restore balance to the follicle.   

In line with patient interest in “natural” treatments, investigators examined the mechanism of action for observed dermatologic benefits of colloidal oatmeal and found that extracts of colloidal oatmeal decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro. 

 

“Clinical evaluations showed that the colloidal oatmeal skin protectant lotion significantly improved dryness, scaling and roughness as early as 1 day after use, and these improvements were maintained over the duration of the study with continued use of the lotion,” the authors wrote. 

Among the investigations into treatments for common but challenging conditions, authors from the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, reported on a case of chronic bilateral nasolabial fold seborrheic dermatitis. They hypothesized that Crisaborole 2% ointment, a PDE4 inhibitor would reduce the inflammation. After 2 treatments per week for 4 weeks, the investigators observed a notable reduction in scaling and erythema on the treatment site.  

Another commonly seen condition, xanthelasma palpebrae, can be a significant cosmetic concern for patients. In a case study published in 2016, researchers report on a case in which they used a hyfrecator for superficial tissue destruction resulting in excellent cosmetic results, the authors showed. 

Melasma and hyperpigmentation are among the challenging conditions dermatologists see. One study still garnering attention is an investigation into the benefit of Vitamin C plus iontophoresis. Investigators observed a mean 73% improvement in abnormal pigmentation after treatment combining Vitamin C with a full-face iontophoresis mask. A mean improvement of 15.7 on the Melasma Area and Severity Index was also noted.  

A review of 10 studies examining the efficacy of retinoids and azelaic acid for the treatment of acne and subsequent post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation in skin of color reported growing evidence that retinoids are well-tolerated and could be considered as first-line therapies to treat acne people with skin of color. In addition, azelaic acid may offer improvement in both acne and hyperpigmentation, the authors noted.  

Finally, a more recent review evaluated 35 randomized controlled trials of topical agents for the treatment of melasma found strong evidence for the recommendation of cysteamine, triple combination therapy, and tranexamic acid. 

As 2020 comes to a close, we are excited as we look to 2021. We are incredibly grateful to the researchers who have chosen to publish their work with JDD. And, we look forward to continuing to play a role in highlighting the benefits of the most promising treatments for your patients in the New Year. 

Heather Onorati is an experienced medical writer and editor with more than 20 years covering the dermatology industry.
Read the top 10 most discussed articles in 2020: 

 

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Clinical Benefits of Circadian-based Antioxidant Protection and Repair

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Featured Article

Skin activities follow endogenous circadian rhythms resulting in differences between daytime and nighttime properties. To address the variations in skin needs, a novel circadian-based dual serum system (LVS) was developed.

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Skin activities follow endogenous circadian rhythms resulting in differences between daytime and nighttime properties. To address the variations in skin needs, a novel circadian-based dual serum system (LVS) was developed.

Zoe Diana Draelos, Elizabeth T Makino, Kuniko Kadoya, Audrey Nguyen, Lily I Jiang, Rahul C Mehta 

 

The concept of human body rhythms has been popularized as important in overall body health. These rhythms are characterized as fluctuations in mental, physical, and emotional well-being based on the clock. These fluctuations are related to the day/night cycle, hormones, meals, sleep/wake cycle, adrenal gland production, thyroid gland, and clock genes.

The study of the body circadian rhythm is known as chronobiology with studies of the body’s inner clock dating back to the 18th century. There are three types of chronobiology rhythms: infradian rhythms, ultraradian rhythms, and circadian rhythms. Infradian rhythms last more than 24 hours and are repeated only every few days, weeks, or months representing such activities as female menses. Ultradian rhythms are shorter than 24 hours and often last several hours, such as ingestion of food. Finally, circadian rhythms last 24 hours with distinctive day/night cycles.

Circadian rhythms are endogenous and adjusted to the local environment by cues call zeitgebers, meaning “time giver” in German. The 2017 Nobel prize in physiology or medicine was awarded for research in molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythms in fruit flies. In humans, the circadian clock is in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, located in the hypothalamus. Information is transmitted to the suprachiasmatic nucleus via the retina that contains specialized photosensitive ganglion cells. PER1 and PER2 genes are expressed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus representing the primary circadian pacemaker in the human brain. These circadian rhythms are also important in the skin with robust autonomic clocks in keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, mast cells, and hair follicles.

Important skin functions affected by circadian rhythms include free radical production and neutralization, DNA damage and repair, keratinocyte/fibroblast differentiation and proliferation, and barrier and immune functioning. Direct and indirect antioxidant protection play an important role in supporting these circadian rhythm skin functions.

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Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been rising.

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Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been rising.

Franchesca D. Choi BS RPh, Calvin T. Sung BS, Margit L.W. Juhasz MD, Natasha Atanaskova Mesinkovska MD PhD

 

 In 2016, the collagen market was valued at an estimated 3.71 billion USD and is projected to reach 6.63 billion USD by 2025. Collagen supplements, originating from various sources (eg, porcine, bovine, marine) and available in numerous formulations (eg, protein, gelatin, hydrolysate, peptides), are marketed as improving skin integrity and modulating skin aging. However, even with this increase in patient interest and market share, the use of collagen supplementation in dermatology remains controversial due to the lack of regulation on quality and quantity of ingredients in over-the-counter collagen supplements, as well as minimal peer-reviewed literature on the subject.

Fortunately, there are increasing numbers of clinical studies regarding potential effects of collagen-based dietary supplements on skin. Collagen is the most abundant component of the extracellular matrix constituting 75% of skin’s dry weight.5 Qualitative and quantitative decline in collagen is associated with cutaneous aging.6 Collagen protein is a right-handed triple helix of parallel polypeptides where every third amino acid residue is glycine (Gly) resulting in X-Y-Gly triplets, where X andY are frequently proline (Pro) and 4-hydroxyproline (Hyp; an amino acid sub- unit unique to collagen), respectively,7 making Pro-Hyp-Gly the most common amino acid triplet unit found in collagen

Native, animal collagen can be extracted from connective tissue in various forms.10 When denatured by heat, collagen forms gelatin, which has been used for centuries as a food source and traditional medicine in Europe and China.

Further enzymatic hydrolysis of gelatin produces collagen hydrolysates (CH) composed of peptides of varying lengths. CH has a lower molecular weight than gelatin, higher water-solubility, and no gelation properties at ambient temperatures, allowing CH to be conveniently formulated into liquid drinks and jelly sticks for oral consumption. In the past decade, CHs have gained popularity as a nutraceutical supplement.

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Read the October JDD Now

Atopic Dermatitis, Public Health, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Article Highlights

 

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What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

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A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

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A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (“Efficacy and Tolerability of a Skin Brightening/Anti-Aging Cosmeceutical Containing Retinol 0.5%, Niacinamide, Hexylresorcinol, and Resveratrol“), which was recently cited in an article on Prevention.com, suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection. 

Patricia Farris MD, Joshua Zeichner MD, and Diane Berson MD

 

Consumers are increasingly interested in over-the-counter skin care products that can improve the appearance of photodamaged and aging skin. This 10-week, open-label, single- center study enrolled 25 subjects with mild to moderate hyperpigmentation and other clinical stigmata of cutaneous aging including fine lines, sallowness, lack of clarity, and wrinkling. Their mean age was 53.4±7.7 years. The test product contained retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide 4.4%, resveratrol 1%, and hexylresorcinol 1.1% in a moisturizing base. Subjects were provided a skin care regimen including a cleanser, hydrating serum, moisturizer, and an SPF 30 sunscreen for daily use. The test product was applied only at night.

The use of this skin brightening/anti-aging cosmeceutical was found to provide statistically significant improvements in all efficacy endpoints by study end. Fine lines, radiance, and smoothness were significantly improved as early as week 2 (P<.001). By week 4, hyperpigmentation, overall skin clarity, evenness of skin tone, and wrinkles showed statistically significant improvement compared to baseline. Mild retinoid dermatitis including flaking and redness occurred early in the study as reflected by tolerability scores. By week 10, subjects reported no stinging, itching, dryness, or tingling.

The results of this open-label clinical study suggest that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

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Biological Effects of Hyaluronic Acid-Based Dermal Fillers and Laser Therapy on Human Skin Models

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This study investigates the molecular effects of different stabilized HA and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-based fillers with and without subsequent additional fractional laser co-treatment.

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This study investigates the molecular effects of different stabilized HA and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-based fillers with and without subsequent additional fractional laser co-treatment.

Laura Huth PhD, Yvonne Marquardt, Ruth Heise PhD, Katharina Fietkau, Jens Malte Baron MD, Sebastian Huth PhD

 

Injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal fillers is one of the most frequently performed aesthetic procedures. HA fillers exist in many different formulations differing in HA concentration, particle size and cross-linking density.

While HA fillers with high-density and large particles are recommended for deep dermal injections, fillers with low-density and small particles are more commonly used for fine lines.

The direct biological effects of dermal fillers monotherapy and combination therapy with ablative fractional CO2- or Er:YAG laser irradiation on human skin cells are not completely understood. Organotypic three-dimensional (3D) skin equivalents have been established for standardized studies of the human skin.

The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular effects of different stabilized HA and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-based fillers with and without subsequent additional fractional laser co-treatment.

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800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin.

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Improvements in skin health is a well-researched benefit of taking collagen – in fact, according to a January 2019 Journal of Drugs in Dermatology study, (recently featured in an Every Day Health article, ” 8 Potential Benefits of Collagen – and 1 Thing it Can’t Do”), 800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin.

Franchesca D. Choi BS RPh, Calvin T. Sung BS, Margit L.W. Juhasz MD, Natasha Atanaskova Mesinkovska MD PhD

Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been rising.

In 2016, the collagen market was valued at an estimated 3.71 billion USD and is projected to reach 6.63 billion USD by 2025. Collagen supplements, originating from various sources (eg, porcine, bovine, marine) and available in numerous formulations (eg, protein, gelatin, hydrolysate, peptides), are marketed as improving skin integrity and modulating skin aging.

However, even with this increase in patient interest and market share, the use of collagen supplementation in dermatology remains controversial due to the lack of regulation on quality and quantity of ingredients in over-the-counter collagen supplements, as well as minimal peer-reviewed literature on the subject. Fortunately, there are increasing numbers of clinical studies regarding potential effects of collagen-based dietary supplements on skin.

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Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

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Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…

In Support of a More Useful Definition for ‘Moderate’ Psoriasis

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Successful psoriasis treatment is dependent upon accurate assessment of disease severity; however, a recent survey indicates that dermatologists report a wide variation in cutoffs for moderate disease classification on traditional…

February issue highlights new perspectives in chronic skin conditions

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It’s a hopeful time of year, and the articles published in this month’s issue underscore this hope and transition with researchers bringing forward new perspectives on chronic skin conditions like…

View the Latest Discoveries in Aesthetics, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

September JDD

The September issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on aesthetic treatments, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Read the September JDD Now

Aesthetics, Public Health, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

The September issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on aesthetic treatments, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

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Editor's Picks

 

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Oral Antibiotics for Acne: Basic Concepts & Practical Considerations

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iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mahmoud Ghannoum, Emmy Graber & Adam Friedman   Antibiotic use for inflammatory skin diseases is a staple in dermatology. Like milk is the answer…

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Psoriasis, The Latest | No Comments
Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…

In Support of a More Useful Definition for ‘Moderate’ Psoriasis

| Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Successful psoriasis treatment is dependent upon accurate assessment of disease severity; however, a recent survey indicates that dermatologists report a wide variation in cutoffs for moderate disease classification on traditional…

The Latest Research & Discoveries in Psoriasis, Anti-Aging, Aesthetics, and Medical Dermatology

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Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

The August issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Psoriasis, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Read the JDD Now

Psoriasis, Public Health, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology

The August issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on  psoriasis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

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Podcast
March 5, 2021

Perspectives on Managing Moderate-to-Severe Atopic Dermatitis

The Ps of Lichen Planus got nothing on this alliteration filled podcast that was purposefully positioned to perfect your practice prowess to punish the pruritus and picking of AD. Join…
Atopic DermatitisPodcast Highlights
March 2, 2021

Oral Antibiotics for Acne: Basic Concepts & Practical Considerations

iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mahmoud Ghannoum, Emmy Graber & Adam Friedman   Antibiotic use for inflammatory skin diseases is a staple in dermatology. Like milk is the answer…
AestheticsFeatured ArticlesPsoriasisThe Latest
February 24, 2021

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…

View the Latest Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology Articles Now

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Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.
Read the JDD Now

Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology

The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Article Highlights

Editor's Picks

You May Also Like

Perspectives on Managing Moderate-to-Severe Atopic Dermatitis

| Podcast | No Comments
The Ps of Lichen Planus got nothing on this alliteration filled podcast that was purposefully positioned to perfect your practice prowess to punish the pruritus and picking of AD. Join…

Oral Antibiotics for Acne: Basic Concepts & Practical Considerations

| Atopic Dermatitis, Podcast Highlights | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mahmoud Ghannoum, Emmy Graber & Adam Friedman   Antibiotic use for inflammatory skin diseases is a staple in dermatology. Like milk is the answer…

Experts Offer Recommendations for Use of Absorbable Suspension Sutures

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Psoriasis, The Latest | No Comments
Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Used alone, absorbable suspension sutures offer a dual mechanism of action Heather Onorati As the use of absorbable suspension…