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Skin of Color

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

By Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Photoprotection, Skin of Color No Comments

Featured Article

Featured Article

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen.

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In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen.

Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl E Grimes MD, Stephen Lynch PhD, Kalli Ji PhD, Manisha Brahmachary PhD, Qian Zheng Md PhD, Charbel Bouez PhD, Janet Wangari-Talbot PhD

 

 

Visible light (400–700nm), which contributes to 45% of solar radiation, contributes to skin darkening and worsening of dyschromias, particularly in individuals with Fitzpatrick skin phototypes III and higher.

The pathogenesis of melasma is incompletely understood, which poses a challenge for disease management. Causative factors include genetics, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, cosmetics, pregnancy, hormonal therapy, phototoxic drugs, and various medications.

Currently, sunscreens provide limited protection against that spectrum. Due to their capabilities in absorbing, scattering, and reflecting visible light, topical products containing pigments and/or metal oxides can provide additional photoprotection.

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Expert grading and colorimetry demonstrated that the iron-oxide containing formulations significantly protected against visible light-induced pigmentation compared to untreated skin or mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen in Fitzpatrick IV individuals.

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The Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD) presents Open Access content, unrestricted access to our original articles, award-winning case studies, clinical trial reviews and clearance updates, drugs and devices, and special content geared toward medical residents and other allied health professionals.
Articles are reviewed by the Editorial Board of renowned experts, from key opinion leaders to well-known clinicians. View our open-access dermatology articles now.
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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Featured Articles | No Comments
Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Revisiting Handwashing – As It Is Absolutely Essential

| Featured Articles, Global Health, The Latest | No Comments
As the coronavirus pandemic continues into the second half of 2020, states across the US remain steadfast in their search to determine the safest methods of returning to normalcy. Without…

View the Latest Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology Articles Now

By JDD Highlights, Skin of Color No Comments

Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.
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Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology

The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Article Highlights

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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Featured Articles | No Comments
Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Treating the AD Patient During COVID-19

| Podcast Highlights | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Peter Lio and Dr. Adam Friedman   Atopic dermatitis is a relentless, recurring, unreasonable, often recalcitrant inflammatory skin disease that impacts millions of children…

An Analysis of Skin of Color Dermatology Related Content on Instagram

By Aesthetics, Skin of Color No Comments

Skin of Color Update

Featured Article

Patients are utilizing internet resources and social media to learn of dermatologic conditions and possible treatments. However, no studies about skin of color dermatology content available on different social media platforms have been done.

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An Analysis of Skin of Color Dermatology Related Content on Instagram

Taylor M Wells BS, Chandler W Rundle MD, Mindy D Szeto BS, Colby Presley , Robert P Dellavalle MD PhD MSPH

 

The population of the United States is becoming increasingly more diverse. The most recent US census showed that while non-Hispanic whites currently make up the majority of the population at 198 million, they remain the only segment of the US population in which deaths outpace the number of births. At the same time, other racial and ethnic groups are experiencing population growth.1 In fact, it is projected that by 2050, over half the US population will be individuals of color.

The lack of dermatologists of color combined with the small percent of dermatologic education dedicated to patients with skin of color3 has created racial disparity in the delivery of care to patients of color. Gorbatenko-Roth et al has confirmed that patients of color are concerned that race-discordant dermatologists do not have specific knowledge of their skin and hair conditions and/ or routine skin and hair care regimens. Additionally, there is concern that these dermatologists do not offer individualized treatments for their disorders.2

Initiatives such as the Diversity Champion Initiative of the AAD’s Diversity Task Force, aimed at diversifying dermatology and increasing exposure to skin of color dermatology during training, have been implemented but these changes are systemic and slower to take effect.4

In the interim, patients are utilizing internet resources and social media to learn of dermatologic conditions and possible treatments. However, no studies about skin of color dermatology content available on different social media platforms have been done. Here, we sought to explore Instagram to identify skin of color-related dermatology content being posted, characterize the generators of this content, and compare the characteristics of content generated by board certified dermatologists with other Instagram users.

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Skin of Color Update Virtual

The Experts’ Forum for Multicultural Dermatology

The US population is growing and evolving and the clinical profile of the average patient presenting to the dermatologist is changing. One in three Americans self-identify as member of a non-caucasian racial or ethnic group. Data shows as of 2020, individuals of non-Caucasian, multi-racial descent will comprise more than 50% of the population.

Skin of Color Update Virtual 2020 Topics

 

  • Hair Loss
  • Acne
  • Rosacea
  • Skin Care with Cosmeceuticals
  • PRP
  • Psoriasis
  • Scalp Psoriasis
  • Skin Cancer
  • and more!
Register for SOCU 2020 Now

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Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Photoprotection, Skin of Color | No Comments
In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…

View the Latest Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology Articles Now

| JDD Highlights, Skin of Color | No Comments
The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.…

An Analysis of Skin of Color Dermatology Related Content on Instagram

| Aesthetics, Skin of Color | No Comments
Patients are utilizing internet resources and social media to learn of dermatologic conditions and possible treatments. However, no studies about skin of color dermatology content available on different social media…

Twenty Nail Dystrophy; a case report from Disharc, Nepal

By Skin of Color, SOCU Poster Abstracts No Comments

Skin of Color Update

Featured Poster Abstract

The following is a selected scientific poster abstract from the 2019 Skin of Color Update.

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"Twenty Nail Dystrophy; a case report from Disharc, Nepal"

Author: Prarthana Adhikari, MD

The following is a selected scientific poster abstract from the 2019 Skin of Color Update.

Twenty-nail dystrophy (TND) is rare and less reported chronic inflammatory disorder affecting nail matrix of all twenty nails. Literature reports mainly as idiopathic but are also associated with cutaneous or systemic disorders among childhood. It clinically presents as rough, thin, brittle lustureless nails with multiple pits. The diagnosis was made clinically but pathological study shows spongiosis and exocytosis of inflammatory cells in epithelium.

Case Report: We present a case of 9-year-old boy with complaints of rough, thin and pitted nails. He was asymptomatic but was under antithyroid medication for hypothyroidism. His only concern was bad appearance. He was given mild topical steroids and emollients. After 6 months of follow-up, patient has shown sign of improvement. Therefore, TND can also be inferenced as self-limiting disease with minimum treatment can have positive reference.

Skin of Color Scientific Poster Abstracts

View a curated selection of scientific poster abstracts from the Skin of Color Update conference below.

Explore More

Skin of Color Update Virtual

The Experts’ Forum for Multicultural Dermatology

The US population is growing and evolving and the clinical profile of the average patient presenting to the dermatologist is changing. One in three Americans self-identify as member of a non-caucasian racial or ethnic group. Data shows as of 2020, individuals of non-Caucasian, multi-racial descent will comprise more than 50% of the population.

Skin of Color Update Virtual 2020 Topics

 

  • Hair Loss
  • Acne
  • Rosacea
  • Skin Care with Cosmeceuticals
  • PRP
  • Psoriasis
  • Scalp Psoriasis
  • Skin Cancer
  • and more!
Register for SOCU 2020 Now

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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Featured Articles | No Comments
Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Treating the AD Patient During COVID-19

| Podcast Highlights | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Peter Lio and Dr. Adam Friedman   Atopic dermatitis is a relentless, recurring, unreasonable, often recalcitrant inflammatory skin disease that impacts millions of children…

Impact of High Coverage Make-up Coverage against Visible Light Exposure

By Aesthetics, Skin of Color No Comments

Skin of Color Update

Featured Poster Abstract

The following is a selected scientific poster abstract from the 2019 Skin of Color Update.

Learn More

"Impact of High Coverage Make-up Coverage against Visible Light Exposure"

Authors: Hawasatu Dumbuya, PhD & Janet Wangari-Talbot, PhD

The following is a selected scientific poster abstract from the 2019 Skin of Color Update.

Historically, photo-protection studies have focused on UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm) protection. However, it is now evident that visible light (400-700 nm) causes skin darkening and contribute to worsening of dyschromia, particularly in individuals with Fitzpatrick phototype III and higher.

Currently, few sunscreens provide protection against visible light. Due to their capabilities in absorbing and reflecting visible light, topical products containing pigments and/or metal oxides (i.e. iron oxide, zinc oxide, and titanium dioxide), can provide additional protection against harmful effects of that spectrum.

Here, we demonstrate that lightly or darkly tinted high coverage pigmented foundation containing iron oxides or a combination of iron oxide and titanium dioxide significantly protected against visible light-induced pigmentation when compared to a mineral SPF50+ sunscreen in Fitzpatrick IV individuals when assessed by visual grading and by chromameter.

Our results show the benefits of high coverage pigmented foundation, containing different concentrations of iron oxide and titanium dioxide, in offering visible light photoprotection. Depending on the metal oxides concentrations, these formulations have the potential to extend protection beyond UV for multiple skin phototypes.

Skin of Color Scientific Poster Abstracts

View a curated selection of scientific poster abstracts from the Skin of Color Update conference below.

Explore More

Skin of Color Update Virtual

The Experts’ Forum for Multicultural Dermatology

The US population is growing and evolving and the clinical profile of the average patient presenting to the dermatologist is changing. One in three Americans self-identify as member of a non-caucasian racial or ethnic group. Data shows as of 2020, individuals of non-Caucasian, multi-racial descent will comprise more than 50% of the population.

Skin of Color Update Virtual 2020 Topics

 

  • Hair Loss
  • Acne
  • Rosacea
  • Skin Care with Cosmeceuticals
  • PRP
  • Psoriasis
  • Scalp Psoriasis
  • Skin Cancer
  • and more!
Register for SOCU 2020 Now

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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Featured Articles | No Comments
Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Treating the AD Patient During COVID-19

| Podcast Highlights | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Peter Lio and Dr. Adam Friedman   Atopic dermatitis is a relentless, recurring, unreasonable, often recalcitrant inflammatory skin disease that impacts millions of children…

Hispanic Tattoo Artists Could Provide Skin Cancer Prevention via Aftercare Instructions and Social Media

By Podcast Highlights, Skin of Color No Comments

JDD Multimedia

JDD Podcast

Listen Now

How to Listen

"Hispanic Tattoo Artists Could Provide Skin Cancer Prevention via Aftercare Instructions and Social Media."

featuring Dr. Adam Friedman, Dr. Robert P. Dellavalle, Dr. Cristian D. Gonzalez

Continued efforts by the dermatology community to educate the public on both photoprotective measures and early skin cancer detection through surveillance has made a significant impact but the battle is far from over, especially in diverse skin phototypes for whom myths and misinformation are still pervasive regarding this space.

Innovative strategies are still sorely needed! Enter mentor-mentee duo Robert P. Dellavalle MD PhD MSPH from the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Cristian D. Gonzalez MD from University of Texas Southwestern, who are no doubt going to create some buzz with their December 2019 JDD study “Hispanic Tattoo Artists Could Provide Skin Cancer Prevention via Aftercare Instructions and Social Media.”

Tune in to hear how both doctors and artists can become allies in canvas (aka skin) cancer education dissemination. Learn how social media can be used as an effective research tool to both recruit and collect data. By the time you are through with this custom work, you will be loyal to the coil.

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CME Available

Upon completion of this enduring activity, participants should be able to

  • discuss gaps in Hispanic tattoo artists’ understanding of skin cancer and willingness to disseminate sun protection information
  • identify opportunities to improve sun safety practices in at risk populations
  • and utilize social media as an emerging population health research tool.
Haven’t listened to this podcast? Listen to it here.
Take CME Now

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Treating the AD Patient During COVID-19

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Atopic dermatitis is a relentless, recurring, unreasonable, often recalcitrant inflammatory skin disease that impacts millions of children and adults in the United States alone and requires a tailored treatment plan…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

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Episode 2 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Why is is that we tend to do things…

The Science of Sun Protection

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Episode 1 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often…

Capturing Consensus and Cutting Out Misconceptions Regarding the Aesthetic Skin of Color Consumer

By Podcast Highlights, Skin of Color No Comments

JDD Multimedia

JDD Podcast

Listen Now

How to Listen

"Capturing Consensus and Cutting Out Misconceptions Regarding the Aesthetic Skin of Color Consumer"

featuring Dr. Adam Friedman & Dr. Andrew Alexis
Who knows what’s best/worst for facial aesthetics in the skin of color patient? No really who? Because there is a great deal of folklore and ballyhoo related to what one can and cannot do, forgetting even what the patients think.
Enter Dr. Andrew Alexis, Professor and Chair of the Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West and Director of the Skin of Color Center, with his experienced SOC entourage to marry personal experience and evidence (what a beautiful couple!).

Tune in to hear how it all went down. You couldn’t be in the room where it happened, but after this podcast you might have well been. Learn from one of the greats as I pick his brain on all things, medical and aesthetic, SOC. C to it you don’t miss this podcast.

Listen Now
CME Available
Upon completion of this enduring activity, participants should be able to:
  • Discuss common myths and mis-perceptions with respect to aesthetics and skin of color patients
  • Review unique considerations in order to optimize the management of skin disease in diverse skin types
Take CME Now

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Treating the AD Patient During COVID-19

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iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Peter Lio and Dr. Adam Friedman   Atopic dermatitis is a relentless, recurring, unreasonable, often recalcitrant inflammatory skin disease that impacts millions of children…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

An Advanced, Physician-Strength Retinol Peel Improves Signs of Aging and Acne Across a Range of Skin Types Including Melasma and Skin of Color

By Skin of Color No Comments

Dermatology News

Featured Article

As a complementary procedure to hydroquinone homecare products, patients have used chemical peels to improve hyperpigmentation or melasma.3 While chemical peels are considered safe for all skin types, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation can be a concern of higher strength chemical peels, particularly in those with darker skin.2

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An Advanced, Physician-Strength Retinol Peel Improves Signs of Aging and Acne Across a Range of Skin Types Including Melasma and Skin of Color

A clinical study was conducted to evaluate the tolerability, safety, and efficacy of the 3% retinol peel with a supportive homecare regimen across a range of peel candidates, females aged 18-65 years, with photodamage, acne, hyperpigmentation or melasma, and skin of color, over a series of 2-4 peels.

Physician-strength chemical peels are consistently the third most common cosmetic procedure next to neurotoxin and soft-tissue filler injections.1 Superficial chemical peels are common and safe peeling procedures.2 Facial chemical peels are highly sought after by aging patients who desire improvements to fine lines and wrinkles, pigmentation, clarity, and laxity, as well as patients with acne, hyperpigmentation, or melasma.

As a complementary procedure to hydroquinone homecare products, patients have used chemical peels to improve hyperpigmentation or melasma.3 While chemical peels are considered safe for all skin types, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation can be a concern of higher strength chemical peels, particularly in those with darker skin.2

Retinol is a proven ingredient for the management of acne and is used as adjunctive care for photodamage due to its ability to enhance exfoliation, increase epidermal thickness, and reduce matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity (collagenase) while increasing collagen.4-7

Studies have demonstrated that topical prescription retinoids are safe and effective in patients with dark skin for the treatment of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation.8 Cosmetic retinol products have been shown to affect hyperpigmentation and provide a more even skin tone.5

An advanced, physician-strength superficial peel containing 3% retinol was developed to exfoliate and improve the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, plump and firm skin, and reduce hyperpigmentation while promoting a bright, even complexion.

Formulated with bisabolol to help calm the skin, and Vitamin E as an antioxidant, this peel provides additional benefits to overall skin appearance with the addition of triethyl citrate and acetyl tyrosinamide to enhance the skin’s matrix for plumping and firming effects.9-11

A single center, prospective clinical study evaluated the tolerability and effectiveness of a series of cosmetic retinol peels, in conjunction with a homecare regimen, to improve the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, skin firmness, and overall complexion brightness on subjects with mild to moderate photodamage across a range of peel candidates, including those with moderate acne, hyperpigmentation or melasma, and skin of color.

Read More Now
JDD Article Referenced in this Post

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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Featured Articles | No Comments
Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Revisiting Handwashing – As It Is Absolutely Essential

| Featured Articles, Global Health, The Latest | No Comments
As the coronavirus pandemic continues into the second half of 2020, states across the US remain steadfast in their search to determine the safest methods of returning to normalcy. Without…

Q-Switched 1064 nm Nd:YAG Laser in Treating Axillary Hyperpigmentation in Filipino Women With Skin Types IV-V

By Skin of Color No Comments

Dermatology News

Featured Article

Post inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) is an acquired hyper-melanosis typically arising following inflammatory lesions. It is one of the most common dermatologic complaints, which may develop in all skin types, however, higher prevalence is seen in patients with Fitzpatrick skin types IV-VI.

Credit: Duangjan – stock.adobe.com Copyright: ©Duangjan – stock.adobe.com

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Q-Switched 1064 nm Nd:YAG Laser in Treating Axillary Hyperpigmentation in Filipino Women With Skin Types IV-V

Use of a low-fluence 1064 nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of axillary hyperpigmentation is safe and effective in patients with darker skin type.

Post inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) is an acquired hyper-melanosis typically arising following inflammatory lesions. It is one of the most common dermatologic complaints, which may develop in all skin types, however, higher prevalence is seen in patients with Fitzpatrick skin types IV-VI.

The etiology underlying PIH can either be an exogenous source (allergy, irritation, contact dermatitis, dermabrasion, laser therapy or burns), an endogenous factor (primary inflammatory or bullous dermatosis) or even induced by an infectious agent such as herpes zoster virus infection. Morphologic pattern and degree of pigmentation vary depending on causative factors and melanin distribution in the epidermis, dermis or both.1,2,3

IH typically manifests as macules or patches in the same distribution in previous areas of inflammation, which can be classified as two clinical forms: epidermal and/or dermal. In epidermal PIH, melanocytes are activated, and release melanin resulting in tan brown or dark brown appearance and may take months to years to resolve. Dermal PIH includes activation of basal keratinocytes, which also release melanin, and present as dark brown to blue-grey discoloration that may either be permanent or resolve over an extended period of time if not treated.

Differentiating between the two is difficult, and PIH is probably a result of the combination of both epidermal and dermal lesions.4 The degree of PIH varies depending on the etiological factors, skin type or “chromatic tendency” as well as exposure to UV light, certain medications and cutaneous injuries (trauma or even shaving).1,2,5,6 The discoloration is determined by the distribution and depth of pigment within the skin layers.

The pathogenesis of PIH is often related to an increase in melanin synthesis and/or irregular pigment dispersion resulting from cutaneous inflammation. It is considered the end result of: melanocyte proliferation, melanin synthesis and increased activation of tyrosinase coupled with transfer of melanosomes to neighboring keratinocytes. Although the exact mechanism is not yet fully understood, the rise in melanocyte activity and proliferation has been known to be stimulated by inflammatory mediators such as reactive oxygen species, prostaglandins and leukotrienes.1,5

Axillary hyperpigmentation is a frequent dermatological complaint, characterized by dermal and epidermal PIH mainly associated with women of darker skin types. Etiological theory associates axillary hyperpigmentation of a form of post inflammatory hyperpigmentation due to continuous irritation due to hair removal, cleansing, tight cloths, or innate darkening from genetic related factors.11

The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the efficacy of a 1064nm nanosecond QS Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of axillary PIH in Filipino women with Fitzpatrick skin types IV-V.

Read Study Now

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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Featured Articles | No Comments
Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Revisiting Handwashing – As It Is Absolutely Essential

| Featured Articles, Global Health, The Latest | No Comments
As the coronavirus pandemic continues into the second half of 2020, states across the US remain steadfast in their search to determine the safest methods of returning to normalcy. Without…

Long-Term Benefits of Daily Photo-Protection With a Broad-Spectrum Sunscreen in United States Hispanic Female Population

By Skin of Color No Comments

Dermatology News

Featured Article

A comprehensive long-term sunscreen use study in skin of color is lacking. Therefore, this study was designed to assess the benefits of sunscreen of SPF30/PPD 20 in Hispanic women of Fitzpatrick skin types IV and V over 12 months in comparison to a real-life observational group with subjects who did not use sunscreen regularly.

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A Safe and Effective Treatment Modality

A study recently published in the JDD reveals phototherapy remains a safe and effective treatment modality for mild to moderate psoriasis vulgaris

The demographics of the United states are evolving with a large increase in racial and ethnic diversity driven by international migration of Hispanic, African, and Asian populations leading to a minority-majority shift in ~2050 towards persons of color (Fitzpatrick III, IV, V, and VI).1 Specifically, the Hispanic population is projected to be among the fastest growing population in the US, projected to increase from 55 million in 2014 to 119 million in 2060, a change of +115%.1

Subjects with skin of color are heterogeneous with multiple shades and tones and different reactions to intrinsic and extrinsic aging factors due to structural and physiologic differences.2,3 Skin of color individuals have fewer visible signs of aging (deep wrinkles, fine lines, rough surface texture, and sun spots).

However, darker skin tones are more susceptible to certain skin conditions including post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (may occur after acne, eczema, injury, laceration, melasma, post-inflammatory hypopigmentation, pityriasis alba (round, light patches covered with fine scales), dry or “ashy” skin, dermatosis papulosa nigra, and/or greater risk of keloid development.2,3 The incidence of skin cancer among US Hispanics has also increased 1.3% annually from 1992 to 2008.4

The benefits of topical agents for reversal of sun damage has been well established. Use of retinoic acid and its derivatives or other drugs to reverse and improve sun damaged skin has been demonstrated in many studies.17,18 Long-term sunscreenuse along with other topical agents have also been shown to prevent photodamage and hyperpigmentation in fair-skinned subjects.19 For effective photoprotection, sunscreen products containing both SPF and PPD are essential to battle the harmful UVB (skin cancer risks) and UVA (photo-aging risks).20 Daily use of a broad-spectrum sunscreen (SPF 30) over a one-year period has also been demonstrated to improve clinical parameters of photodamage in phototype I-III subjects.10

However, a comprehensive long-term sunscreen use study in skin of color is lacking. Therefore, this study was designed to assess the benefits of sunscreen of SPF30/PPD 20 in Hispanic women of Fitzpatrick skin types IV and V over 12 months in comparison to a real-life observational group with subjects who did not use sunscreen regularly.

Read Article Now
JDD Article Referenced in this Post

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Atopic DermatitisFeatured ArticlesThe Latest
November 16, 2020

Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…
Featured Articles
November 10, 2020

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…
Featured ArticlesGlobal HealthThe Latest
October 27, 2020

Revisiting Handwashing – As It Is Absolutely Essential

As the coronavirus pandemic continues into the second half of 2020, states across the US remain steadfast in their search to determine the safest methods of returning to normalcy. Without…