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Skin Cancer

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

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Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman

 

Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder…the list goes on. What about not following practices that have a library of evidence supporting their use, like sunscreen and photo-protection?

To better understand this conundrum JDD Podcast host Dr. Adam Friedman recruited mental health guru Dr. Sherry Pagoto, Professor in the Department of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Connecticut and Director of the UConn Center for mHealth and Social Media, to dive deep into human behavior and how this relates to medical compliance.
Find a couch to lie down on as you digest the litany of psychosocial pearls Dr. Pagoto shares, rounded out by some evidenced based guidance on using social media to engage a broader audience. #dontmissthispodcast
This podcast was supported by Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc.
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CME Available
This enduring continuing education activity is supported by an independent medical education grant provided by Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Participants who earn a minimum, passing grade of 70% would be eligible to receive up to 0.5 credit hours AMA PRA Category 1™ and ANCC credit per podcast. A total of 1 hour for this two-part Sun Protection series.

Learning Objectives

 

Upon completion of this enduring, internet-based series of continuing education activities,  participants should be able to:
  • Develop strategies leading to effective clinician-patient dialogues to better motivate patients to integrate regular use of sunscreens in their skin care regimen
Take CME Now

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Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman   Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

By Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer No Comments

JDD Multimedia

JDD Podcast

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The Science of Sun Protection
Part I

Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman

 

Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths, and offer our first born children to get our patients to utilize sunscreen the right way when this behavior directly and primarily benefits them. Why is this and how do we airdrop knowledge in a meaningful way?
In part one of this bonus two part podcast series dedicated to the science and psychology of sunscreen use, AAD Vice President Elect Neal Bhatia, MD joins host Adam Friedman, MD to slather on some practical approaches to communicating sunscreen science and real world use.
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CME Credits Available
This enduring continuing education activity is supported by an independent medical education grant provided by Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. 
Participants who earn a minimum, passing grade of 70% would be eligible to receive up to 0.5 credit hours AMA PRA Category 1™ and ANCC credit per podcast. A total of 1 hour for this two-part Sun Protection series.
Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this enduring, internet-based series of continuing education activities,  participants should be able to:
  • Differentiate features, benefits and limits of chemical and physical sunblocking products
  • Discuss the role of product formulation, delivery vehicle and patient type when recommending sun protection strategies
  • Review multifunctional approaches to photoprotection including use of sunscreen-containing moisturizers and other skin care products
  • Develop strategies leading to effective clinician-patient dialogues to better motivate patients to integrate regular use of sunscreens in their skin care regimen
Take CME Now

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Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman   Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

By Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer No Comments

JDD Multimedia

JDD Podcast

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Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman

 

Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with substantial baggage adding to this proclamation with skin, hair, and nail adverse events significantly impacting quality of life and even treatment course.
Enter supportive oncodermatology, and along with it the mastermind behind this rapidly emerging field, Dr. Mario Lacouture, Professor and Director of the Oncodermatology Program in the Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.
Dr. Lacatoure joins podcast host Dr. Adam Friedman to discuss the array of cutaneous clusters that not only can, but are almost expected to occur during cancer therapy. Learn how even simple OTC products can contribute to both ameliorating and even preventing some of these sequelae. Understand how you (yeah, I’m talkin’ to you) can make an extraordinary impact in these patients’ lives. Tune in to this podcast to support your supportive oncoderm fund of knowledge.
This podcast was supported by Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc.
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Upcoming Related Supplement:
  • The Biological Impact of Oats: Eczema and Beyond
  • Blair Allais MD and Adam Friedman MD FAAD
  • Department of Dermatology, George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC
  • October 2020 | Volume 19 | Issue 10 | Supplement| Copyright © October 2020

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Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman   Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with…

View the Latest Discoveries in Skin Cancer Research

By Skin Cancer No Comments

Dermatology Resource Centers

JDD Resource Centers

Stay up-to-date on new clinical findings in Skin Cancer  View the latest articles, case reports, supplements, Podcast episodes and more!

Skin Cancer Resource Center

The Latest Clinical Findings in Skin Cancer

Discover the latest research in Skin Cancer: introducing the JDD Skin Cancer Resource Center.

Review clinical findings, articles, case reports, supplements, podcast episodes and more.

Skin Cancer Articles

  • Impact of a 31-gene Expression Profiling Test for Cutaneous Melanoma on Dermatologists’ Clinical Management Decision

    Following a diagnosis of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), patients are often guided for subsequent management by their dermatologist and national guideline recommendations. Based upon staging classification for CMM, guidelines recommend diagnostic tests and additional evaluation which may provide defined treatment protocols, surveillance, and follow-up.

     

  • A Randomized Trial of Broad Area ALA–PDT for Field Cancerization Mitigation in High-Risk Patients

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) are precancerous, dysplastic epidermal lesions with potential for progression to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). A study by Criscione et al1 revealed that in a high-risk population (≥2 keratinocyte carcinomas in previous 5 years), approximately 65% of all primary SCCs arose in lesions previously diagnosed as AKs. Furthermore, it demonstrated that the risk of malignant progression of AKs to primary SCC increases over time (0.6% at 1 year and 2.6% at 4 years).1 Cellular damage and atypia seen histologically in AKs are similar to those of surrounding nonlesional skin,2,3 suggesting that skin surrounding AKs may have an increased risk of skin cancer.

     

  • Multiple Primary Melanomas Occurring Around the Same Time: A Review of Terminology and Implications

    Multiple primary melanomas (MPMs) have been reported to occur in 2-10% of melanoma patients. This study conducted a review of the literature to elucidate the definitions of terminology used to describe MPMs that were diagnosed in close temporal proximity as well as explore common risk factors. Terminology found in the literature included “concurrent”, “simultaneous” and “synchronous” with varying definitions that ranged from 0-6 months between diagnoses of the first and subsequent melanomas. Eight cases are described in chronological order, and the incidence of MPMs diagnosed around the same time were reported as 22-39%. Nevus spilus was identified as a potential risk factor for MPMs. This study highlights that MPMs are not uncommon, and clinicians should remain aware that MPMs can be diagnosed at or around the same time, warranting thorough skin exams.

 
View All Skin Cancer Articles

Case Reports

  • Basal Cell Carcinoma in the Nasal Vestibule

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCC) arise from DNA damage to cells of the basal layer of the epidermis and most commonly in areas of the skin exposed to sunlight or ultraviolet radiation. BCC is the most common skin cancer seen in humans with over 4.3 million cases reported in the United States and is responsible for 3-10% of all cancers annually. We report what we believe to be the first case of this very prevalent skin cancer arising in the nasal vestibule. The lesion was treated with Mohs micrographic surgery and required three stages to obtain histological clearance. Given the location of the tumor, Mohs surgery was chosen due to the procedure’s effectiveness for achieving the highest cure rate with the lowest incidence of tumor recurrence and for preserving as much adjacent healthy tissue as possible

     

  • Combination Topical Chemotherapy for the Treatment of an Invasive Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Standard of care for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is usually surgical, with either excision or Mohs micrographic surgery. However, surgery may not be ideal for elderly patients with numerous lesions, who are poor surgical candidates or who refuse surgery. Topical 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and imiquimod have been studied off-label as monotherapies in the treatment of SCC in situ with promising results. However, long-term tumor-free survival rates are still less than with surgical management.

     

  • Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising Within a Linear Porokeratosis

    Here we report a case of linear porokeratosis with recurrent malignant degeneration to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) recurring six years after excision of initial SCC. A 79-year-old woman presented with a friable tumor located within a longstanding lesion on her posterior thigh. Six years prior, she was diagnosed with SCC arising within the same lesion, which had been surgically excised with negative margins. Physical examination revealed a 3.5 x 2.7 cm friable tumor on the left proximal posterior thigh.

 
View All Skin Cancer Case Reports

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Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

Support the (On)cause: A Practical Review of Supportive Oncodermatology

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Mario Lacouture and Adam Friedman   Cancer sucks, plain and simple. What is often overlooked is that the life saving/altering therapies often come with…

Controversies in Photoprotection

By Derm Community, ODAC, Photoprotection, Skin Cancer No Comments

Dermatology News

Video Pearls

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD is Professor and Interim Chair of Dermatology and serves as Residency Program Director, Director of Translational Research, and Director of the Supportive OncodermatologyProgram in the Department of Dermatology at The George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences. Dr. Friedman completed his undergraduate training at the University of Pennsylvania and graduated with Distinction in Dermatologic Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York.

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Controversies in Photoprotection

featuring Dr. Adam Friedman

Journal of Drugs in Dermatology partners Next Steps in Derm and ODAC Dermatology Aesthetic and Surgical Conference interviewed Dr. Adam Friedman, Professor, Interim Chair of Dermatology, and Residency Program Director at George Washington University, on some of the common misconceptions and controversies surrounding photoprotection.

Debunking Misconceptions on Photoprotection

While ample evidence has shown that sunscreen not only reduces the incidences of melanoma, it also helps prevent  accelerated skin aging, many misconceptions about sunscreen are preventing patients from using what we have available to them.

Watch as Dr. Friedman debunks some of the current myths surrounding photoprotection and provides guidance on what we should really pay attention to.

Explore Photoprotection Articles

ODAC Orlando Dermatology, Aesthetic & Surgical Conference

ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference (ODAC) is a distinguished ACCME accredited dermatology conference designed to meet the needs of medical and aesthetic dermatology providers in the 21st century. Founded in 2003 by dermatology pioneer, Dr. Perry Robins, the ODAC Dermatology Conference provides nearly 700 dermatologists, residents, nurse practitioners and physician assistants with important annual updates and fresh practical pearls in the field of medical, cosmetic and surgical dermatology in a highly interactive format.

Reasons to Attend ODAC 2021

  • Discuss the next generation of diagnostic approaches and evidence-based dermatology treatments
  • Observe cutting-edge procedures and techniques with live demonstrations of novel products and emerging technologies
  • Review clinical trial results and discuss case-studies in both large and small group settings
  • Cultivate relationships with colleagues and leaders actively shaping the future of dermatology
  • Earn CME –  up to 31 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™
Register for ODAC 2021 Now

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

NEW Webinar – Differentiating Approach to Acne Therapy: Women Vs. Men

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Join Leon H. Kircik, MD and Julie Harper, MD as they discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris. October 27th, 2020 7:00 PM - 8:00…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

Saving Our Skin: A Surgeon’s Story of Tenacity, Adventure and Giving Back

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Dermatology News

Derm Community

To celebrate the 40th birthday of The Skin Cancer Foundation, Dr. Robins is donating proceeds from all sales of his memoir to the Foundation he founded in 1979.

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Saving Our Skin: A Surgeon’s Story of Tenacity, Adventure and Giving Back, by Perry Robins, MD

In his new book, JDD Founder, Dr. Perry Robins, details how he upended conventional wisdom in the medical community by showing dermatologists that they could be skin cancer surgeons.

Perry Robins, MD, saved our skin — literally. The world-renowned surgeon took on an enemy of unimaginable power: the sun. At a time when most people worshipped a sun-kissed glow, the medical techniques and messages Dr. Robins promoted had the power to affect every human being on the planet.

Born in Newark during the Great Depression, Perry Robins never had it easy, but he always made the best of it. Struggling in school with dyslexia and grueling part-time jobs, being drafted by the Army and sent overseas—none of the obstacles life threw his way could slow him down.

After his medical training from Germany to NYU, Dr. Robins studied a type of skin cancer surgery invented by Frederic Mohs, MD, at the University of Wisconsin. He brought the technique back to NYU and established the first fellowship program in Mohs surgery. Despite resistance, Dr. Robins upended conventional wisdom in the medical community by showing dermatologists that they could be skin cancer surgeons.

He took on skin cancer at a time when few people were aware of it, and when fashion dictated a “deep, dark, sexy” tan. He taught Mohs surgery, now the gold standard of treatment, to physicians in the U.S. and around the world. He created international alliances as well as the first charitable foundation devoted to educating people about skin cancer, using his own hard-earned money. He cured cancers (47,000 of them in his 40-plus years of practice at NYU), changed people’s perceptions about the sun and made friends all over the world as a professor, entrepreneur and philanthropist.

“Written with warmth and humor, this memoir documents the amazing story of Perry Robins, MD, from a humble beginning in New Jersey to becoming a world-class surgeon who cured cancers and changed the world for the better. Readers will be inspired by his enormous energy, curiosity, larger-than-life personality and keen vision for the future —and will have a rollicking good time along the way!” — C. William Hanke, MD, Mohs surgeon in Indianapolis who has served as president of 13 professional societies

To celebrate the 40th birthday of The Skin Cancer Foundation, Dr. Robins is donating proceeds from all sales of his memoir to the Foundation he founded in 1979.

Get Your Copy Today

Saving Our Skin: A Surgeon’s Story of Tenacity, Adventure and Giving Back, by Perry Robins, MD

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What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

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Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?

By Derm Community, ODAC, Skin Cancer No Comments

Dermatology News

National Skin Cancer Month

The discussion was led by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda, and was moderated by Dr. William Hanke.

Learn More

Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs? Highlights from the 17th Annual ODAC Conference

In recognition of National Skin Cancer Month, the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology and our industry partners, Next Steps, are taking a look back at an engaging panel discussion, “Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?,” from the 17th Annual ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference in Orlando, Florida.

The case-based discussion examined the use of Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) versus other treatment modalities for non-melanoma skin cancers, Merkel cell carcinoma, and lentigo maligna.

Case I: Highlights

The first case described a 41-year-old Fitzpatrick type II female with two superficial basal cells on her right central cheek (5×7 mm) and right chin (6×8 mm). Mohs Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) score is 7 for both lesions, justifying MMS for both lesions. Pretty straightforward right?

Think again. Dr. Patel implored the use of topical immunotherapy with imiquimod for these lesions given a study by Williams et al. (1). This randomized clinical trial examined the interventions of either imiquimod 5% cream once daily (superficial basal cell carcinoma, 6 weeks; nodular basal cell carcinoma, 12 weeks) or excisional surgery (4-mm margin) on 3- and 5-year success rates. The 3-year success rate was defined as the clinical absence of initial failure or signs of recurrence at the 3-year dermatology review, and Five-year success was defined as 3-year success plus absence of recurrences identified through medical records. The 5-year success rates for imiquimod were 82.5% compared with 97.7% for surgery (relative risk of imiquimod success = 0.84, 95% confidence interval = 0.77-0.91, P < 0.001). These were comparable to year 3 success rates. Most imiquimod treatment failures occurred in year 1.

View More on Next Steps

This information was presented by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda at the 17th ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference held January 17th-20st, 2020 in Orlando, FL.

Further case highlights can be reviewed by visiting Next Steps in Derm.

More on Mohs

ODAC Orlando Dermatology, Aesthetic & Surgical Conference

ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference (ODAC) is a distinguished ACCME accredited dermatology conference designed to meet the needs of medical and aesthetic dermatology providers in the 21st century. Founded in 2003 by dermatology pioneer, Dr. Perry Robins, the ODAC Dermatology Conference provides nearly 700 dermatologists, residents, nurse practitioners and physician assistants with important annual updates and fresh practical pearls in the field of medical, cosmetic and surgical dermatology in a highly interactive format.

Reasons to Attend ODAC 2021

  • Discuss the next generation of diagnostic approaches and evidence-based dermatology treatments
  • Observe cutting-edge procedures and techniques with live demonstrations of novel products and emerging technologies
  • Review clinical trial results and discuss case-studies in both large and small group settings
  • Cultivate relationships with colleagues and leaders actively shaping the future of dermatology
  • Earn CME –  up to 31 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™
Register for ODAC 2021 Now

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NEW Webinar – Differentiating Approach to Acne Therapy: Women Vs. Men

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Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

Supportive Oncodermatology Interventions Improve Patient Quality of Life

By Derm Community, Skin Cancer No Comments

Dermatology News

National Skin Cancer Month

Enrollment in a supportive oncodermatology program is associated with a significantly improved quality of life score, according to a recent survey from the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center. The results of the survey were published in the May issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.

Read JDD Article Now

"Supportive Oncodermatology Interventions Improve Patient Quality of Life"

Enrollment in a supportive oncodermatology program is associated with a significantly improved quality of life score, according to a recent survey from the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center. The results of the survey were published in the May issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.

Improved Quality of Life

Supportive oncodermatology is a growing field that provides treatment and preventive care to oncology patients who experience adverse dermatologic events associated with their cancer treatments. While dermatologic health in cancer patients is gaining attention, the literature evaluating the impact of supportive oncodermatology clinics on patient quality of life is limited.

To identify the impact of these programs, the group at GW performed a cross-sectional survey of adult cancer patients enrolled at the Supportive Oncodermatology Clinic at GW Cancer Center. Those who met inclusion criteria were invited to complete an online survey with questions adapted from the Dermatology Life Quality Index and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire.

“Our results show that patient quality of life benefited significantly from enrollment in the clinic’s programs,” said Adam Friedman, MD, director of the GW Supportive Oncodermatology Clinic, interim chair of the Department of Dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and senior author on the study. “The supportive oncodermatology field is a critical element of multidisciplinary cancer care that addresses dermatologic wellness in cancer patients.”

The respondents reported satisfaction with the care they received at the GW Supportive Oncodermatology Clinic, especially in terms of providers’ interpersonal manner and communication and would recommend this type of care to other cancer patients.

Prior to receiving care at the clinic, patients had an average quality of life score of 6.5, indicating a “moderate effect” dermatologic adverse events have on quality of life. On average, scores were significantly reduced by 2.7 points after joining the clinic.

While patients reported overall satisfaction with dermatologic care, many reported being unsure if those interventions aided in adherence to anticancer treatment. Because of this, the authors pointed out, it is necessary to develop evidence-based management systems for dermatologic adverse effects.

The article, titled “The Influence of Supportive Oncodermatology Interventions on Patient Quality of Life: A Cross-Sectional Survey,” is published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology and is available at jddonline.com/articles/dermatology/S1545961620P0477X.

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Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

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iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

#ShareTheFacts About Skin Cancer

By Derm Community, Skin Cancer No Comments

Dermatology News

National Skin Cancer Month

Dermatologists play an important role in helping to save lives, by educating patients, and the public, on skin cancer prevention; the dangers of unprotected exposure, and how to detect early warning signs.

#ShareTheFacts About Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, but is also one of the most preventable.

Dermatologists play an important role in helping to save lives, by educating patients, and the public, on skin cancer prevention; the dangers of unprotected exposure; and how to detect early warning signs  –  early detection means a high probability of eliminating it entirely.

#ShareTheFacts

This month, the Skin Cancer Foundation invites providers to #sharethefacts on skin cancer by accessing its set of downloadable images and resources to help patients stay informed on skin cancer treatment and prevention.

Visit the Skin Cancer Foundation to learn more about its #ShareTheFacts campaign, and how you can help.

Learn More

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NEW Webinar – Differentiating Approach to Acne Therapy: Women Vs. Men

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Join Leon H. Kircik, MD and Julie Harper, MD as they discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris. October 27th, 2020 7:00 PM - 8:00…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

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iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…