Category

JDD in the Media

How to Get Rid of Dry Skin

By Featured Articles, JDD in the Media No Comments

Dermatology News

Featured Article

Colloidal oat extracts exhibit anti-inflammatory activities, which may provide the mechanisms for observed dermatological benefits when using the colloidal oatmeal in skin protectant lotion.

Read Article Now

"How to Get Rid of Dry Skin"

Dry skin is a common complaint, with many dermatology patients seeking treatments for itching, irritation, and tightness. Severe dry skin can lead to cracked skin and bleeding.
While there are many topical agents to combat dry skin, including scent-free lotions, emollients, and creams, one tried-and-true remedy is making a comeback.

Insider.com‘s recent feature, “How to Get Rid of Dry Skin,” cites JDD research on oatmeal’s efficacy in combating dry, irritated skin ( “Anti-inflammatory Activities of Colloidal Oatmeal (Avena Sativa) Contribute to the Effectiveness of Oats in Treatment of Itch Associated With Dry, Irritated Skin” )

A 2015 study published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology showed that colloidal oatmeal (which is essentially oats that have been finely ground down) is effective at reducing skin dryness, roughness, and itchiness. This is because oatmeal helps repair the skin barrier, is anti inflammatory, and has antioxidant properties […].

Moreover, colloidal oat extracts exhibit anti-inflammatory activities, which may provide the mechanisms for observed dermatological benefits when using the colloidal oatmeal in skin protectant lotion.

Topical Applications of Oatmeal

Discover more research on oatmeal’s anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant properties and applications in a variety of skin conditions.

JDD Article Referenced in this Post

You May Also Like

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

| Photoprotection, Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…

The Science of Sun Protection

| Podcast | No Comments
Episode 1 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often…

Why Melatonin Is Really Good for Your Skin

By JDD in the Media No Comments

Dermatology News

Featured Article

Melatonin is one of the latest trendy skincare ingredients that supposedly helps restore and improve skin tone, while helping to combat signs of aging.
While the hormone helps improve the body’s sleep and wake cycle, there has been evidence that it furnishes antioxidant properties that rival that of vitamin C and E.
Read Article Now

"Why Melatonin Is Really Good for Your Skin"

Melatonin is one of the latest trendy skincare ingredients that supposedly helps restore and improve skin tone, while helping to combat signs of aging.
While the hormone helps improve the body’s sleep and wake cycle, there has been evidence that it furnishes antioxidant properties that rival that of vitamin C and E.

Elle Magazine’s recent feature, “Why Melatonin Is Really Good for Your Skin” cites JDD research on the matter, “Assessing the Potential Role for Topical Melatonin as an Antiaging Skin Regimine.”

All day long, your skin encounters damaging free radicals, thanks to pollution and UV exposure. These face foes can alter the skin’s DNA, resulting in photo damage and even cancer, according to Lain. In order to neutralize free radicals, your body makes antioxidants, with the help of antioxidant enzymes. “Melatonin stimulates your body’s natural production of these enzymes,” says Dr Engelman. And, according to a study published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, these melatonin-induced antioxidants are more effective than those from the ever-popular vitamins C and E.

Melatonin works in concert with more common anti-aging ingredients to increase antioxidant levels, and dermal applications don’t seem to affect energy levels.

Learn more about Melatonin’s use in anti-aging skin regimens – check out the article here.

Read Article Now
JDD Article Referenced in this Post

You May Also Like

AestheticsFeatured Articles
September 14, 2020

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…
PhotoprotectionPodcast HighlightsSkin Cancer
September 10, 2020

NEW from the JDD Podcast: “The Science of Sun Protection”

iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Neal Bhatia and Dr. Adam Friedman   Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often we must defend good science, dispel unfounded myths,…
Podcast
September 10, 2020

The Science of Sun Protection

Episode 1 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Photoprotection works, plain and simple. Yet all too often…

Treatment of Plaque Psoriasis With an Excimer Laser Utilizing an Optimal Therapeutic UVB Dose Protocol

By JDD in the Media No Comments

Treatment of Plaque Psoriasis With an Excimer Laser Utilizing an Optimal Therapeutic UVB Dose Protocol

Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disease that mainly affects the skin and joints.

Treatment for psoriasis depends on the severity, along with many other factors, and limited psoriasis can often be treated with topical agents, while patients with moderate to severe disease may also need phototherapy by ultraviolet irradiation or systemic therapy.

During phototherapy treatments, therapeutic doses of ultraviolet light may be administered by broadband ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation (290-320 nm), narrowband UVB (311-313 nm), and PUVA – photochemotherapy with psoralen followed by ultraviolet A radiation (320-400 nm).6,7
A recent study published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology investigates the efficiency and efficacy of the Multi-Micro Dose® diagnostic tip accessory for STRATA’s proprietary XTRAC® 308nm excimer laser in treatment of plaque psoriasis:
[…] treatment with the excimer laser was well tolerated. Similar to previous reports,11,14-16 erythema was the most common adverse event. No erosions or hyperpigmentation were reported. Two patients experienced blistering after initiation of the actual treatment. Blistering is an expected side effect in phototherapy with the excimer laser, and is usually well tolerated by patients.14,17,18 Blistering might be related to the user’s techniques (overlapping of laser treatment fields), or it may occur if the plaque’s thickness varies.

The OTDTM protocol with the MMD tip allows adjusting the treatment dose with the excimer laser to specific plaques, resulting in more effective dosing levels and a lower frequency of treatment sessions.

Read More

You May Also Like

View the Latest Discoveries in Aesthetics, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

| Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
The September issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on aesthetic treatments, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

The Latest Research & Discoveries in Psoriasis, Anti-Aging, Aesthetics, and Medical Dermatology

| JDD Highlights | No Comments
The August issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Psoriasis, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.…

View the Latest Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology Articles Now

| JDD Highlights, Skin of Color | No Comments
The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.…

Are Dermatologists Prepared for Natural and Manmade Disasters?

By JDD in the Media No Comments

Natural and manmade disasters cause a range of dermatologic manifestations, including secondary infections after a flood, irritation from blistering agents used in chemical warfare, or acute and chronic effects of cutaneous radiation syndrome.

In a study, “A Survey of Dermatologists’ Preparedness for Natural and Man-made Disasters,” (January 2020 Journal of Drugs in Dermatology), Adam Friedman, MD, interim chair of the Department of Dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, finds that dermatologists are under prepared for biological disasters, and would benefit from comprehensive preparedness training.
“Recognizing and diagnosing the conditions that can arise following a disaster requires diagnostic acumen, knowledge on reporting, and short- and long-term management strategies,” Dr. Friedman said.

The study cites a 2003 survey  in which that 88% of dermatologists felt unprepared to respond to a biological attack.

“Encouragingly, though, 75% reported that disaster preparedness should be part of dermatology training, thus a formal training program is sorely needed to meet this demand,” the study notes.

Read Article Now

You May Also Like

Featured ArticlesJDD in the Media
June 8, 2020

How to Get Rid of Dry Skin

Colloidal oat extracts exhibit anti-inflammatory activities, which may provide the mechanisms for observed dermatological benefits when using the colloidal oatmeal in skin protectant lotion. Dry skin is a common complaint,…
JDD in the Media
April 29, 2020

Why Melatonin Is Really Good for Your Skin

Melatonin is one of the latest trendy skincare ingredients that supposedly helps restore and improve skin tone, while helping to combat signs of aging. While the hormone helps improve the…
JDD in the Media
April 13, 2020

Treatment of Plaque Psoriasis With an Excimer Laser Utilizing an Optimal Therapeutic UVB Dose Protocol

Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disease that mainly affects the skin and joints. Treatment for psoriasis depends on the severity, along with many other factors, and limited psoriasis can often…

Topcials in Psoriasis Treatments

By JDD in the Media No Comments

Psoriasis is a chronic disease that can affect many areas of the body. The use of topical corticosteroids (TCS) is a common treatment, although long-term safety of TCS remains a concern.

A recent article in Dermatology Times cites a Journal of Drugs in Dermatology study which examines how Topical Halobetsol Propionate 0.01% lotion appears to “safely and quickly improve lower-extremity psoriatic lesions,” over typical TCS treatments.
“A post hoc analysis of data from phase 3 studies investigating the efficacy of halobetasol propionate 0.01% lotion for treating moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis showed that the topical corticosteroid was associated with rapid improvement, and  findings should help dermatologists with treatment decisions for patients with disease involving leg lesions, said Neal Bhatia, M.D., director of clinical dermatology at Therapeutics Clinical Research, San Diego, and the lead author of the paper.”

At the conclusion of the eight-week treatment, the rate of success was significantly higher for patients randomized  to once-daily treatment with halobetasol 0.01% lotion compared with vehicle-treated controls (P<.001 for both comparisons).

View Article Now

You May Also Like

Featured ArticlesJDD in the Media
June 8, 2020

How to Get Rid of Dry Skin

Colloidal oat extracts exhibit anti-inflammatory activities, which may provide the mechanisms for observed dermatological benefits when using the colloidal oatmeal in skin protectant lotion. Dry skin is a common complaint,…
JDD in the Media
April 29, 2020

Why Melatonin Is Really Good for Your Skin

Melatonin is one of the latest trendy skincare ingredients that supposedly helps restore and improve skin tone, while helping to combat signs of aging. While the hormone helps improve the…
JDD in the Media
April 13, 2020

Treatment of Plaque Psoriasis With an Excimer Laser Utilizing an Optimal Therapeutic UVB Dose Protocol

Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disease that mainly affects the skin and joints. Treatment for psoriasis depends on the severity, along with many other factors, and limited psoriasis can often…

Could You Be Allergic to Additives?

By JDD in the Media No Comments
A recent article from US News, “Could You Be Allergic to Additives?” cites a January 2013  JDD study  on whether common additives in food or medications can cause reactions in some people.
The study, “Medication Dyes as a Source of Drug Allergy,” states “Excipients are defined as inert substances added to a drug or food to confer a suitable consistency, appearance, or form. They may be added for bulk, to change dissolution or the kinetics of absorption, to improve stability, to influence palatability, or to create a distinctive appearance. The last function may depend heavily on the use of coloring agents, especially when there are multiple dosages (such as with warfarin), and dose confusion may result in profound complications. While described as inert, excipients have been associated with triggering immunological reactions, although this is almost never considered in common practice when patients have reactions to medications, even when they appear to react to many different and distinct drugs.”
Read Article Now

You May Also Like

Featured ArticlesJDD in the Media
June 8, 2020

How to Get Rid of Dry Skin

Colloidal oat extracts exhibit anti-inflammatory activities, which may provide the mechanisms for observed dermatological benefits when using the colloidal oatmeal in skin protectant lotion. Dry skin is a common complaint,…
JDD in the Media
April 29, 2020

Why Melatonin Is Really Good for Your Skin

Melatonin is one of the latest trendy skincare ingredients that supposedly helps restore and improve skin tone, while helping to combat signs of aging. While the hormone helps improve the…
JDD in the Media
April 13, 2020

Treatment of Plaque Psoriasis With an Excimer Laser Utilizing an Optimal Therapeutic UVB Dose Protocol

Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disease that mainly affects the skin and joints. Treatment for psoriasis depends on the severity, along with many other factors, and limited psoriasis can often…

Latest Article Citations

By JDD in the Media

“Even dermatologists misdiagnose and mismanage fungal infections.”

Dermatologists face a number of obstacles when using fungal diagnostic preparations to diagnose cutaneous fungal infections.

In an article from Dermatology Times, Lisette Hilton cites findings from an August 2019 study (“Use of In-Office Preparations by Dermatologists for the Diagnosis of Cutaneous Fungal Infections“) published in the JDD that although cutaneous fungal infections account for millions of office visits per year, yet their varied presentations often lead to misdiagnosis.

“Cutaneous fungal infections account for 3.5 to 6.5 million office visits per year1 – despite being common, their diverse presentations frequently lead to misdiagnosis.2,3 In one study, only 4 out of 13 dermatophytosis cases presented were accurately identified by more than 75% of board-certified dermatologists.4 In addition, other conditions can mimic fungal infections, such as mycosis fungoides5 or inflammatory diseases including annular psoriasis, secondary syphilis, and pityriasis rosea.4″

Despite the importance of bedside fungal preparations, dermatologists’ attitudes towards and utilization of these tests are unknown. An IRB-approved survey was disseminated to the Orlando Dermatology Aesthetic and Clinical Conference (ODAC) email list and the data was collected via an internet-based platform. The survey study examined dermatologists’ perceptions of fungal preparations and identified barriers preventing their use.

Read Article Now

You May Also Like

Derm Community
June 16, 2020

A Must-Read: The Business of Dermatology

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining…
Derm CommunityODACPhotoprotectionSkin Cancer
June 1, 2020

Controversies in Photoprotection

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD is Professor and Interim Chair of Dermatology and serves as Residency Program Director, Director of Translational Research, and Director of the Supportive OncodermatologyProgram in the Department…
Derm CommunityODACSkin Cancer
May 18, 2020

Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?

The discussion was led by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda, and was moderated by Dr. William Hanke. In recognition of National Skin Cancer Month, the Journal of Drugs…

December Article Citations

By JDD in the Media
“Men may have different reasons for visiting a cosmetic surgeon’s office, but one fairly universal concern they share is wanting to maintain (or enhance) their masculinity.” 

The number of Nonsurgical aesthetic procedures performed for male patients is growing is growing rapidly. However, there is limited data on treatment principles and goals for the male aesthetic patient.

In an article from Dermatology Times,  Katie Hobbins cites findings from research published in the January 2018 issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology ( The Male Aesthetic Patient: Facial Anatomy, Concepts of Attractiveness, and Treatment Patterns“) that reports a “lack of information available on male aesthetic treatments and goals contributes to the disproportionately small national percentage of men seeking the advice of a cosmetic physician when compared to women. “

Expert advisors met to discuss anatomical differences in male versus female facial anatomy related to aging, facial treatment preferences in aesthetically oriented men, and current dosing data for facial injectable treatments in male versus female patients.

Read Article Now

You May Also Like

Featured ArticlesJDD in the Media
June 8, 2020

How to Get Rid of Dry Skin

Colloidal oat extracts exhibit anti-inflammatory activities, which may provide the mechanisms for observed dermatological benefits when using the colloidal oatmeal in skin protectant lotion. Dry skin is a common complaint,…
JDD in the Media
April 29, 2020

Why Melatonin Is Really Good for Your Skin

Melatonin is one of the latest trendy skincare ingredients that supposedly helps restore and improve skin tone, while helping to combat signs of aging. While the hormone helps improve the…
JDD in the Media
April 13, 2020

Treatment of Plaque Psoriasis With an Excimer Laser Utilizing an Optimal Therapeutic UVB Dose Protocol

Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disease that mainly affects the skin and joints. Treatment for psoriasis depends on the severity, along with many other factors, and limited psoriasis can often…

Latest Article Citations

By JDD in the Media
Take a look at the latest JDD article citations from around the dermatology community, including the New York Times, Dermatology Advisor, and Dermatology Times:
“New Combination of Oral Antibiotic and Topical Gel Shows Promise for Severe Acne”

Dermatology Advisor

Read Now
“7 Home Remedies That Will Soothe Itchy Skin, According to Dermatologists”

Prevention

Read Now
“Are There Benefitrs to Collagen Supplements?”

New York Times

Read Now

You May Also Like

Derm Community
June 16, 2020

A Must-Read: The Business of Dermatology

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining…
Derm CommunityODACPhotoprotectionSkin Cancer
June 1, 2020

Controversies in Photoprotection

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD is Professor and Interim Chair of Dermatology and serves as Residency Program Director, Director of Translational Research, and Director of the Supportive OncodermatologyProgram in the Department…
Derm CommunityODACSkin Cancer
May 18, 2020

Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?

The discussion was led by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda, and was moderated by Dr. William Hanke. In recognition of National Skin Cancer Month, the Journal of Drugs…