Category

Featured Articles

Phototherapy for Psoriasis: A Safe and Effective Treatment Modality

By Featured Articles No Comments

Featured Article

“Fewer people are doing mainstay full-body phototherapy as in the past, as biologics and other systemic therapies have proven to be safe and much more effective,” Dr. Nestor said in a recent interview with Dermatology Times.

Read Article Now

Phototherapy for Psoriasis: A Safe and Effective Treatment Modality

A study recently published in the JDD reveals phototherapy remains a safe and effective treatment modality for mild to moderate psoriasis vulgaris

Phototherapy remains a safe and effective treatment modality for mild to moderate psoriasis, according to Mark S. Nestor, M.D., Ph.D., in a study recently published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.
Current options for treating psoriasis include systemic and topical agents: systemic treatment options may involve immune inhibitors, and/or immune modulators. For moderate to severe cases, biologic agents may be used.
Topical agents may be comprised of ointments, medicated baths, and phototherapy.

“Fewer people are doing mainstay full-body phototherapy as in the past, as biologics and other systemic therapies have proven to be safe and much more effective,” Dr. Nestor said in a recent interview with Dermatology Times.

“Additionally,” he added, “laser has largely taken over for individual and spot treatment of specific areas because you don’t have the same issue of systemic problems with burning.”

In the study, “Randomized, Investigator-Blinded Study to Compare the Efficacy and Tolerance of a 650-microsecond, 1064-nm YAG Laser to a 308-nm Excimer Laser for the Treatment of Mild to Moderate Psoriasis Vulgaris,” co-authored by Dr. Nestor, Daniel Fischer DO MS,a and David Arnold DOa eligible subjects enrolled in a randomized, investigator-blinded study.

Psoriatic plaques on one side of the body were treated with the 650-microsecond laser and plaques on the other side were treated with the 308-nm excimer laser. Study subjects received up to 15 treatments, twice weekly, or fewer if full clearance was achieved. Efficacy and tolerance were evaluated by the mPASI scores and local skin reactions, respectively.

Both devices showed efficacy in treating psoriatic plaques. Differences between the two devices were not significant for redness, thickness, scaliness, mPASI scores for arms and legs, and overall mPASI scores for the treated psoriatic plaques on each side of the body. The investigator-assessed scores for erosion/ulceration, vesicles, erythema, scaling, edema, and atrophy were low and identical for both sides of the body.

“There is potential for utilizing this therapy much more in the future, especially in areas such as the palms and soles, where excimer appears to be less effective,” Dr. Nestor said.

Read Article Now

You May Also Like

AestheticsFeatured Articles
September 14, 2020

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…
AestheticsFeatured ArticlesPhotoprotectionSkin of Color
September 9, 2020

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…
AestheticsCME ActivitiesFeatured Articles
September 1, 2020

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…

GW Survey Evaluates Influence of Social Media in Attracting Patients

By Featured Articles No Comments

Featured Article

“A rapidly growing number of dermatologists are advocating for the value of social media to promote their practices,” said Adam Friedman, MD, interim chair of the Department of Dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences and senior author on the study. “Only one other survey has been conducted on patient perception of social media. There hasn’t been enough to show us how effective social media is as a marketing tool for dermatologists.”

Read Article Now

GW Survey Evaluates Influence of Social Media in Attracting Patients

A survey from the George Washington University evaluated whether patients consider a dermatologist’s social media presence when looking for a doctor

WASHINGTON (May 7, 2020) – Patients often do not take social media into consideration when looking for a dermatologist, according to a survey from researchers at the George Washington University. The survey was published recently in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.

As of 2019, 79% of Americans have a social media presence on platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Many dermatologists consider social media to be a useful tool for building their practices and recruiting patients. However, limited data exists about whether a provider’s social media presence is a driver in attracting new patients to their practice.

“A rapidly growing number of dermatologists are advocating for the value of social media to promote their practices,” said Adam Friedman, MD, interim chair of the Department of Dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences and senior author on the study. “Only one other survey has been conducted on patient perception of social media. There hasn’t been enough to show us how effective social media is as a marketing tool for dermatologists.”

The GW research team distributed a 10-question online survey to a diverse patient population to evaluate their perceptions of social media and what aspects of a dermatologist’s site are the most helpful. Only 25% of respondents aged 18–30 years old thought social media was extremely or very important, suggesting that leaning on social media may not be the best way to grow a practice.

The results also indicated that respondents who did utilize social media for these purposes were interested in seeing patient education, viewing patient reviews, as well as dermatologists’ experience levels rather than personal information.

“While patients overall may not rely on social media to select a dermatologist nor be interested in nonmedical content, many of our respondents did express interest in educational content written by their dermatologists on social media,” Friedman said. “Practitioners should still count social media as a tool in building their practices and engaging their current patients, however, it should be one of many methods that they rely on to recruit new patients.”

The authors say that further research needs to be done to determine whether social media is an effective educational tool for dermatologists.

Read Article Now

You May Also Like

AestheticsFeatured Articles
September 14, 2020

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…
AestheticsFeatured ArticlesPhotoprotectionSkin of Color
September 9, 2020

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…
AestheticsCME ActivitiesFeatured Articles
September 1, 2020

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…

The Influence of Dermatologists’ Use of Social Media on Attracting Patients

By Featured Articles No Comments

Featured Article

Emily C. Murphy BS, Kamaria Nelson MD, and Adam J. Friedman MD

In a new article, published in the May 2020 issue of the JDD,  “The Influence of Dermatologists’ Use of Social Media on Attracting Patients,” authors Emily C. Murphy BS,a,b Kamaria Nelson MD,a and Adam J. Friedman MDa examine how social media influences patients when choosing a dermatologist and the aspects of dermatologists’ sites that offer the most benefits to patients.

Read Article Now

"The Influence of Dermatologists’ Use of Social Media on Attracting Patients"

As of 2019, 79% of Americans have a social media profile, with the majority using platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram.1 Social media was originally created to connect with family and friends, but individuals now use it to self-promote, to disseminate information, and for activism.

Physicians are even more likely to use social media than the general population, with 87% having an account in 2011.2 In the medical community, social media allows for the distribution of health information and may increase healthcare access by connecting patients and physicians.3,4 Despite these benefits, there is also concern among practitioners about the misuse of social media given its lack of regulation, which may lead to inappropriate online consultations, spread of false information, and HIPAA violations.3

In a new article, published in the May 2020 issue of the JDD,  “The Influence of Dermatologists’ Use of Social Media on Attracting Patients,” authors Emily C. Murphy BS,a,b Kamaria Nelson MD,a and Adam J. Friedman MDa examine how social media influences patients when choosing a dermatologist and the aspects of dermatologists’ sites that offer the most benefits to patients.

Read Article Now

You May Also Like

AestheticsFeatured Articles
September 14, 2020

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…
AestheticsFeatured ArticlesPhotoprotectionSkin of Color
September 9, 2020

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…
AestheticsCME ActivitiesFeatured Articles
September 1, 2020

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…
Dermatologist looking at skin

Is the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic an Indication to Temporarily Modify Dermatological Management Plans?

By Featured Articles, Global Health No Comments

Featured Article

Dermatologist looking at skin

"Is the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic an Indication to Temporarily Modify Dermatological Management Plans?"

While the world lives under the shadow of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, dermatologists wonder if the current situation calls for a temporary change in the management of skin conditions.

Immunosuppressive drugs are used ubiquitously in the modern treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases like psoriasis, bullous diseases, connective tissue diseases, and many others. Treatment of these conditions is based on the suppression of the patient’s immune system using steroids, steroid-sparing drugs, and biological agents.1
“The use of immunosuppressive to treat these conditions can amplify this effect, and it might leave the patient vulnerable to more serious complications should an infection with the novel coronavirus be established. Hence, it may be wise to restrict temporarily the use of immunosuppressive agents including systemic steroids, steroid-sparing agents, and biologics in dermatology daily practice until more evidence is avilable about their safety in the current pandemic.6 As a relates point, the International Psoriasis Council declared an urgent statement on March 11, 2020 that the physician should be alert to the potentially harmful effects of COVID-19 infection on patients with psoriasis and to immediately discontinue or postpone immunosuppressant medications for psoriasis patients diagnosed with COVID-19 disease.”

As the declaration of the novel coronavirus as a pandemic by the WHO is a trending topic nowadays, dermatologists around the world view with concern the impact of this pandemic on their daily practice.

Read Full Article Now

You May Also Like

AestheticsFeatured Articles
September 14, 2020

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…
AestheticsFeatured ArticlesPhotoprotectionSkin of Color
September 9, 2020

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…
AestheticsCME ActivitiesFeatured Articles
September 1, 2020

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…

Universal Protocol in Mohs Micrographic Surgery: Incorporating a “Time Out” Procedure in Histopathologic Interpretation

By Featured Articles No Comments

In 1999, the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) first report, “To Err Is Human”, brought forth the issue of medical error in patient care.1 In this publication, the IOM recognized that mistakes or failures to prevent mistakes were mostly caused by flawed systems, processes, and conditions. It outlined a four-tiered approach to improve safety including: 1) development of leadership, research, tools, and protocols to enhance the knowledge base on safety, 2) a nationwide public mandatory reporting system and encouraging voluntary participation to identify and learn from errors, 3) oversight organizations, professional groups, health care purchasers to raise performance standards and expectations, and 4) implementation of safety systems in the healthcare organization to ensure delivery of safe practice. This was the first roadmap towards a safer health system.

The Joint Commission adopted a formal Sentinel Event Policy to assist office-based surgery practices to improve safety and learn from serious adverse events when they occur. To reduce errors, the Joint Commission implemented the use of Universal Protocol to prevent wrong-site, wrong-person, or wrong-procedure surgery.2 In dermatology, the addition of preoperative biopsy-site photography has been helpful in site identification. In a survey study of 722 Mohs surgeons, 89% reported photographs as the most useful tool to decrease risk of wrong-site surgery.3

Surgical specialties have incorporated Universal Protocol, consisting of a verification process, surgical site marking, and time out immediately prior to procedure. The time out is designed to ensure correct patient identity, correct scheduled procedure, and correct surgical site. The pre-procedure verification process and surgical site marking include the patient, nursing staff, and Mohs surgeon by confirming patient’s name and date of birth, reviewing pathology report and photographs if available, and involving the patient in site identification. We believe a time out process during interpretation of Mohs histopathology sections would minimize mapping errors that could lead to persistence or recurrence of cancer, as well as over-resection of tissue.

Often times several patients’ slides are prepared simultaneously to maximize efficiency. As a result, several sets of slides are completed at the same time for the surgeon to read. The combination of multiple patients with possibly more than one slide each further compounds the risk for error. The time out procedure should involve at least two people: Mohs surgeon, fellow, resident, histology technician, or nurse. The verbal confirmation should include patient’s name, diagnosis, stage, and section number (Table 1). The time out process should occur prior to slide being placed on the microscope and agreed upon by Mohs surgeon and second participant. The procedure must be performed before reading each slide in order to facilitate accurate map marking.

Read Article Now

You May Also Like

Derm Community
June 16, 2020

A Must-Read: The Business of Dermatology

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining…
Derm CommunityODACPhotoprotectionSkin Cancer
June 1, 2020

Controversies in Photoprotection

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD is Professor and Interim Chair of Dermatology and serves as Residency Program Director, Director of Translational Research, and Director of the Supportive OncodermatologyProgram in the Department…
Derm CommunityODACSkin Cancer
May 18, 2020

Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?

The discussion was led by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda, and was moderated by Dr. William Hanke. In recognition of National Skin Cancer Month, the Journal of Drugs…