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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

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Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various mechanisms of action including direct anti-inflammatory, anti-pruritic, anti-oxidant, anti-fungal, pre-biotic, barrier repair properties, and beneficial effects on skin pH. These have been shown to be of particular benefit in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

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Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various mechanisms of action including direct anti-inflammatory, anti-pruritic, anti-oxidant, anti-fungal, pre-biotic, barrier repair properties, and beneficial effects on skin pH. These have been shown to be of particular benefit in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

Blair Allais MD, Adam Friedman MD FAAD

 

 

Oatmeal has a longstanding and rich history pertaining to its dermatologic use. The first documentation of oatmeal for skin health dates back as early as 2000 BC in Arabia and Egypt, where it was described as soothing and protecting in dry or itchy, inflamed skin. Oatmeal flour was subsequently recognized as a topical therapy for a variety of dermatologic conditions in Roman medical literature. The first scientific studies on the skin benefits of oatmeal appeared in the 1930s, including information about the cleansing properties of oatmeal, its role in relieving itch, and its function as a skin protectant.

In the 1940s and 1950s colloidal oatmeal became commercially available both in powder form and mixed with emollient oils, instigating medical studies examining the benefits of colloi-dal oatmeal baths in various xerotic dermatoses.

The results of this open-label clinical study suggest that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

In 1989, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved colloidal oatmeal as a safe and effective over-the-counter drug. In 2003, the FDA noted that colloidal oatmeal could relieve irritation and itching due to a number of dermatoses, providing temporary skin protection.5 Colloidal oatmeal is one of the few products that the FDA recognizes as a safe over the counter treatment. Today it is available in various forms including creams, lotions, shampoos, shaving gels, bath treat-ments, and body wash.

Colloidal oatmeal is the powder obtained from the grinding and processing of whole oat grain. Under strict protocols es-tablished by the US Pharmacopeia, oat grain is ground and processed until no more than 3% of the total particles in the powder exceed 150 μm in size and no more than 20% exceed 75 μm in size.6 The small size of the particles contributes to their ability to deposit on the skin and form an occlusive barrier when dispersed in water. Oat is composed of various types of phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. Col-loidal oatmeal consists of sugars and amino acids (65%), proteins (15–20%), lipids (11%), and fiber (5%).7 The most important groups of phytochemicals present in oats include phenolics, β-glucans, lignans, avenanthramides, carotenoids, vitamin E, and phytosterols.

Of the phenolics present in oats, ferulic acid and caffeic acid are strong antioxidants, and fe-rulic acid also has UV absorbing properties.8 Flavonoids, a group of phenolic compounds present in oat, also are capable of absorbing ultraviolet A light from 320–370 nm. β-glucans are polysaccharides of D-glucose monomers and have a high viscosity largely due to their β-(1–3)-linkages.This viscosity contributes to the water-binding properties of oat. Oats also contain a wide range of minerals and vitamins, of which vita-min E is the most clinically relevant. Vitamin E is a naturally occurring antioxidant that protects against oxidative stress, inflammation, and photo-induced aging.

Learn more about the history, basic science, mechanism of Action, and clinical efficacy of colloidal oatmeal in the treatment of Atopic Dermatitis now.

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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Revisiting Handwashing – As It Is Absolutely Essential

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As the coronavirus pandemic continues into the second half of 2020, states across the US remain steadfast in their search to determine the safest methods of returning to normalcy. Without…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been rising.

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Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been rising.

Franchesca D. Choi BS RPh, Calvin T. Sung BS, Margit L.W. Juhasz MD, Natasha Atanaskova Mesinkovska MD PhD

 

 In 2016, the collagen market was valued at an estimated 3.71 billion USD and is projected to reach 6.63 billion USD by 2025. Collagen supplements, originating from various sources (eg, porcine, bovine, marine) and available in numerous formulations (eg, protein, gelatin, hydrolysate, peptides), are marketed as improving skin integrity and modulating skin aging. However, even with this increase in patient interest and market share, the use of collagen supplementation in dermatology remains controversial due to the lack of regulation on quality and quantity of ingredients in over-the-counter collagen supplements, as well as minimal peer-reviewed literature on the subject.

Fortunately, there are increasing numbers of clinical studies regarding potential effects of collagen-based dietary supplements on skin. Collagen is the most abundant component of the extracellular matrix constituting 75% of skin’s dry weight.5 Qualitative and quantitative decline in collagen is associated with cutaneous aging.6 Collagen protein is a right-handed triple helix of parallel polypeptides where every third amino acid residue is glycine (Gly) resulting in X-Y-Gly triplets, where X andY are frequently proline (Pro) and 4-hydroxyproline (Hyp; an amino acid sub- unit unique to collagen), respectively,7 making Pro-Hyp-Gly the most common amino acid triplet unit found in collagen

Native, animal collagen can be extracted from connective tissue in various forms.10 When denatured by heat, collagen forms gelatin, which has been used for centuries as a food source and traditional medicine in Europe and China.

Further enzymatic hydrolysis of gelatin produces collagen hydrolysates (CH) composed of peptides of varying lengths. CH has a lower molecular weight than gelatin, higher water-solubility, and no gelation properties at ambient temperatures, allowing CH to be conveniently formulated into liquid drinks and jelly sticks for oral consumption. In the past decade, CHs have gained popularity as a nutraceutical supplement.

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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Revisiting Handwashing – As It Is Absolutely Essential

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As the coronavirus pandemic continues into the second half of 2020, states across the US remain steadfast in their search to determine the safest methods of returning to normalcy. Without…

Revisiting Handwashing – As It Is Absolutely Essential

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As the coronavirus pandemic continues into the second half of 2020, states across the US remain steadfast in their search to determine the safest methods of returning to normalcy. Without a readily available, effective COVID-19 vaccine, and as the numbers of infected individuals continues to climb, the best practices to ensure public safety are rooted in good personal hygiene and prevention of transmission of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. To that end, in addition to properly wearing adequate facial covering, individuals should properly wash their hands to prevent direct auto-inoculation.

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As the coronavirus pandemic continues into the second half of 2020, states across the US remain steadfast in their search to determine the safest methods of returning to normalcy. Without a readily available, effective COVID-19 vaccine, and as the numbers of infected individuals continues to climb, the best practices to ensure public safety are rooted in good personal hygiene and prevention of transmission of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

Graham L. Litchman DO MS, Justin W. Marson MD, Neal Bhatia MD, Brian Berman MD PhD

 

Despite being a technique widely taught from primary school-age, many individuals do not practice adequate hand hygiene and, even pre-pandemic, suffered from economic losses of missed days at work and/or school.1 Study data have shown that the simple act of handwashing, regardless of other medical interventions, can reduce the transmission of respiratory viruses.2 Furthermore, handwashing with an adequate antimicrobial product for at least 20 seconds can reduce the risk of transmission of viruses, including respiratory viruses like SARS-CoV-2.

Consistent use of water and soap or alcohol-based sanitizer has been estimated by the World Health Organization (WHO) to reduce pathogen spread up to 50% among healthcare workers. Newer studies are now focusing on “virucidal” properties of alternative and novel agents and combinations.

The results of this open-label clinical study suggest that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

Sodium hypochlorite (chemically known as NaOCl and more commonly referred to as “Liquid Bleach”), is a chlorine-derived product, that has been used as a disinfectant for over 200 years, and came to prominence in the 1930s. Open wounds were treated with hypochlorite solutions during World War I, which lead to more routine use within hospitals.6 This paired with aggressive marketing, ultimately lead to “Clorox” becoming the household name for a disinfectant.

The antimicrobial effects of these chlorine-derived products comes from their ability to disrupt the membranes of bacteria, fungi, and viruses as well as induce oxidative damage to the necessary proteins and enzymes for microbial survival.7 The strengths of chlorine-derived agents are determined by their concentration and the solvent (typically water) in which they are mixed. When NaOCl is added to water the reaction yields hypochlorous acid ion (HOCl) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH).

Because NaOCl is more stable, it usually predominates at equilibrium. However, in more acidic solvents, the concentration of HOCl increases. This increases the potency of the solution’s antimicrobial properties given that HOCl is 80–120 times more efficient at eliminating bacteria, viruses, and fungi than sodium hypochlorite. Hypochlorous acid on its own is far too caustic and is not appropriate for application to the skin or human body; consequently, it is reserved for disinfecting inanimate objects, demonstrating that its strength comes at a price.

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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Featured Articles | No Comments
Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Revisiting Handwashing – As It Is Absolutely Essential

| Featured Articles, Global Health, The Latest | No Comments
As the coronavirus pandemic continues into the second half of 2020, states across the US remain steadfast in their search to determine the safest methods of returning to normalcy. Without…

View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Read the October JDD Now

Atopic Dermatitis, Public Health, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Article Highlights

 

Editor's Picks

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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Treating the AD Patient During COVID-19

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iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Peter Lio and Dr. Adam Friedman   Atopic dermatitis is a relentless, recurring, unreasonable, often recalcitrant inflammatory skin disease that impacts millions of children…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

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A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

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A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (“Efficacy and Tolerability of a Skin Brightening/Anti-Aging Cosmeceutical Containing Retinol 0.5%, Niacinamide, Hexylresorcinol, and Resveratrol“), which was recently cited in an article on Prevention.com, suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection. 

Patricia Farris MD, Joshua Zeichner MD, and Diane Berson MD

 

Consumers are increasingly interested in over-the-counter skin care products that can improve the appearance of photodamaged and aging skin. This 10-week, open-label, single- center study enrolled 25 subjects with mild to moderate hyperpigmentation and other clinical stigmata of cutaneous aging including fine lines, sallowness, lack of clarity, and wrinkling. Their mean age was 53.4±7.7 years. The test product contained retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide 4.4%, resveratrol 1%, and hexylresorcinol 1.1% in a moisturizing base. Subjects were provided a skin care regimen including a cleanser, hydrating serum, moisturizer, and an SPF 30 sunscreen for daily use. The test product was applied only at night.

The use of this skin brightening/anti-aging cosmeceutical was found to provide statistically significant improvements in all efficacy endpoints by study end. Fine lines, radiance, and smoothness were significantly improved as early as week 2 (P<.001). By week 4, hyperpigmentation, overall skin clarity, evenness of skin tone, and wrinkles showed statistically significant improvement compared to baseline. Mild retinoid dermatitis including flaking and redness occurred early in the study as reflected by tolerability scores. By week 10, subjects reported no stinging, itching, dryness, or tingling.

The results of this open-label clinical study suggest that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Featured Articles | No Comments
Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Revisiting Handwashing – As It Is Absolutely Essential

| Featured Articles, Global Health, The Latest | No Comments
As the coronavirus pandemic continues into the second half of 2020, states across the US remain steadfast in their search to determine the safest methods of returning to normalcy. Without…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin.

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Improvements in skin health is a well-researched benefit of taking collagen – in fact, according to a January 2019 Journal of Drugs in Dermatology study, (recently featured in an Every Day Health article, ” 8 Potential Benefits of Collagen – and 1 Thing it Can’t Do”), 800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin.

Franchesca D. Choi BS RPh, Calvin T. Sung BS, Margit L.W. Juhasz MD, Natasha Atanaskova Mesinkovska MD PhD

Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been rising.

In 2016, the collagen market was valued at an estimated 3.71 billion USD and is projected to reach 6.63 billion USD by 2025. Collagen supplements, originating from various sources (eg, porcine, bovine, marine) and available in numerous formulations (eg, protein, gelatin, hydrolysate, peptides), are marketed as improving skin integrity and modulating skin aging.

However, even with this increase in patient interest and market share, the use of collagen supplementation in dermatology remains controversial due to the lack of regulation on quality and quantity of ingredients in over-the-counter collagen supplements, as well as minimal peer-reviewed literature on the subject. Fortunately, there are increasing numbers of clinical studies regarding potential effects of collagen-based dietary supplements on skin.

Read Full Article Now
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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Featured Articles | No Comments
Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Revisiting Handwashing – As It Is Absolutely Essential

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Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

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In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen.

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In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen.

Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl E Grimes MD, Stephen Lynch PhD, Kalli Ji PhD, Manisha Brahmachary PhD, Qian Zheng Md PhD, Charbel Bouez PhD, Janet Wangari-Talbot PhD

 

 

Visible light (400–700nm), which contributes to 45% of solar radiation, contributes to skin darkening and worsening of dyschromias, particularly in individuals with Fitzpatrick skin phototypes III and higher.

The pathogenesis of melasma is incompletely understood, which poses a challenge for disease management. Causative factors include genetics, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, cosmetics, pregnancy, hormonal therapy, phototoxic drugs, and various medications.

Currently, sunscreens provide limited protection against that spectrum. Due to their capabilities in absorbing, scattering, and reflecting visible light, topical products containing pigments and/or metal oxides can provide additional photoprotection.

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Expert grading and colorimetry demonstrated that the iron-oxide containing formulations significantly protected against visible light-induced pigmentation compared to untreated skin or mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen in Fitzpatrick IV individuals.

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The Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD) presents Open Access content, unrestricted access to our original articles, award-winning case studies, clinical trial reviews and clearance updates, drugs and devices, and special content geared toward medical residents and other allied health professionals.
Articles are reviewed by the Editorial Board of renowned experts, from key opinion leaders to well-known clinicians. View our open-access dermatology articles now.
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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Featured Articles | No Comments
Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Revisiting Handwashing – As It Is Absolutely Essential

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As the coronavirus pandemic continues into the second half of 2020, states across the US remain steadfast in their search to determine the safest methods of returning to normalcy. Without…

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

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CME Activities

Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.

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Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.

As the aging US population is growing, minimally invasive strategies have become the primary treatment modalities for addressing mild to moderate age-related facial changes. The introduction of microfocused ultrasound (MFU) represents a method to produce a deeper wound healing response with increased collagen remodeling and more durable clinical response. MFU-V treatment protocols continue to be refined and use in combination with other minimally invasive strategies including injectable dermal fillers such as diluted calcium hydroxylapatite for skin laxity and appearance of lines in the neck and décolletage has been studied.

Need exists for expanded understanding of dermatology providers on the application of microfocused ultrasound in combination with injectable dermal fillers as a treatment approach for lifting skin on the neck and face and for improving lines and wrinkles on the chest

CME Certificate Information

  • This CME examination requires a 70% pass mark to receive the CME credit and certificate.
  • This activity is supported by an educational grant provided by Galderma Laboratories, L.P.

Upon completion of this continuing education activity participants should be able to:

  • Summarize the mechanism of action of high-resolution ultrasound imaging (MFU-V) for lifting skin on the neck and face, improving lines and wrinkles on the chest and improving collagen synthesis
  • Identify patients best suited for treatment with MFU-V in combination with injectable dermal fillers
  • Compare features, benefits, and safety profile MFU-V treatment in lifting skin on the neck and face and for improving lines and wrinkles on the chest
Take CME Now

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Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

| Aesthetics, CME Activities, Featured Articles | No Comments
Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…

Expiring Soon: Capturing Consensus and Cutting Out Misconceptions regarding the Aesthetic Skin of Color Consumer

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0.5 CME Credits Who knows what’s best/worst for facial aesthetics in the skin of color patient? No really who? Because there is a great deal of folklore and ballyhoo related…

Re-examining the Optimal Use of Neuromodulators and the Changing Landscape: A Consensus Panel Update

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1 CME CreditSince initial US Food and Drug Administration approval of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) for aesthetic use in 2002, clinical evidence and experience with BoNT-A and understanding of…

View the Latest Discoveries in Aesthetics, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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Dermatology News

JDD Highlights

September JDD

The September issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on aesthetic treatments, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Read the September JDD Now

Aesthetics, Public Health, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

The September issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on aesthetic treatments, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.

Article Highlights

 

Editor's Picks

 

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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Featured Articles | No Comments
Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Treating the AD Patient During COVID-19

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iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Dr. Peter Lio and Dr. Adam Friedman   Atopic dermatitis is a relentless, recurring, unreasonable, often recalcitrant inflammatory skin disease that impacts millions of children…

Topical Cannabinoids for the Management of Psoriasis Vulgaris: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

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The interest in use of medical cannabis for chronic dermatologic conditions such as psoriasis, eczema, and acne has been growing mostly owing to rapidly emerging decriminalization across the country and impressive commercially driven popularization of a variety of cannabinoid preparations including topical forms such as creams, salves, lotions, lubricants, and many others.

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This report details a case of a young man with psoriasis managed with topical cannabinoids.

Adam J. Friedman MD, Kimia Momeni BS, Mikhail Kogan MD

 

The interest in use of medical cannabis for chronic dermatologic conditions such as psoriasis, eczema, and acne has been growing mostly owing to rapidly emerging decriminalization across the country and impressive commercially driven popularization of a variety of cannabinoid preparations including topical forms such as creams, salves, lotions, lubricants, and many others.

However, while the market is exponentially growing, the rate at which mechanistic and clinical evidence supporting the use of cannabinoids in a litany of diseases is significantly slower. In fact, Robinson et al highlighted significant gaps in dermatologists understanding of the biology of cannabinoids and comfort with this space, further highlighting the great need to disseminate information throughout the medical community.

Along this vein, we present a case of a young man with psoriasis managed with topical cannabinoids.

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Colloidal Oatmeal Part I: Clinical Efficacy in the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

| Atopic Dermatitis, Featured Articles, The Latest | No Comments
Colloidal oatmeal has a long-standing history in the treatment of dermatologic disease. It is composed of various phytochemicals, which contribute to its wide-ranging function and clinical use. It has various…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Featured Articles | No Comments
Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been…

Revisiting Handwashing – As It Is Absolutely Essential

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Increased Trend of Cosmetic Procedures in Patients With Psoriasis Who Attain 75% or Greater Improvement

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A survey was conducted at a single dermatology center to determine if there was an increased trend in cosmetic procedures in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis who attained 75% or greater reduction of the body surface area (BSA) with biologic agents and oral systemic therapies, and if this was related to an improvement in quality of life following psoriasis clearance.

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A survey was conducted at a single dermatology center to determine if there was an increased trend in cosmetic procedures in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis who attained 75% or greater reduction of the body surface area (BSA) with biologic agents and oral systemic therapies, and if this was related to an improvement in quality of life following psoriasis clearance.

Michelle E. Walters MD, Delphine J. Lee MD PhD, Paul S. Yamauchi MD PhD

Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition with a negative impact on patient quality of life. The National Psoriasis Foundation states that an acceptable response to psoriasis treatment is at least a 75% reduction in body surface area (BSA) at 3 months after initiation of treatment.

This reduction in BSA has been associated with improvement in quality of life, with clearance rates of clear to almost clear leading to an even greater improvement in quality of life.2,3 To date, there have been no studies examining the relationship between improvement in quality of life following a reduction in BSA, and the increased utilization of cosmetic procedures. Here, we examine the relationship between quality of life and the use of various cosmetic procedures in patients treated for psoriasis with systemic and biologic therapies who achieved at least 75% reduction in BSA.

This was a retrospective study assessing quality of life and the use of cosmetic procedures in psoriasis patients after attaining a75% or greater reduction of the body surface area with biologic agents only, systemic agents only, or a combination of both. This study was conducted according to the ethical guidelines of the 1975 Declaration of Helsinki. All patients provided informed consent.

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Post-Inflammatory Hyperpigmentation: A Review of Treatment Strategies

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Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) is a reactive process resulting from increased melanin or abnormal distribution of melanin secondary to inflammatory skin conditions, dermatologic therapies, and external stimuli. Because PIH is a common condition that has a substantial effect on the quality of life, an understanding of its treatment modalities is essential. Though there are many therapeutic strategies for hyperpigmentary conditions such as melasma that are described in the literature, fewer studies focus on PIH. This article aims to provide a comprehensive literature review of therapies specifically used to treat PIH, such as topical combinations, chemical peels, and lasers.

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This article aims to provide a comprehensive literature review of therapies specifically used to treat PIH, such as topical combinations, chemical peels, and lasers.

Adele Shenoy BA, Raman Madan MD

Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) is a reactive process resulting from increased melanin or abnormal distribution of melanin, secondary to inflammatory skin conditions such as acne, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, and psoriasis, as well as external factors such as burns and radiation therapy. An understanding of treatment strategies for PIH is essential, as it has a large impact on the quality of life.

Though there are many therapeutic strategies for hyperpigmentary conditions such as melasma that are described in the literature, fewer studies specifically address PIH. Thus, we conducted a literature review on PubMed using key words “post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation” OR “postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.”

Studies that did not specifically address PIH and articles that were not published in English were excluded. Additional studies were obtained by scanning references. This review adds to the current literature by discussing the evidence for topical therapies, chemical peels, and laser therapy used specifically for hyperpigmentation from PIH.

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