Category

Derm Community

A Must-Read: The Business of Dermatology

By Derm Community No Comments

Dermatology News

Derm Community

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining a practice.

Learn More

The Business of Dermatology

Review by Omer Ibrahim, MD

Business intellect, a vital aspect of managing a practice, is not taught in residency. From the infancy of their training, dermatologists are trained to think broadly and scrupulously, using each clue, each corporeal sense, and each available tool to accurately diagnose and manage a plethora of cutaneous conditions. After residency, dermatologists set out armed with the knowledge and drive to deliver expert care to their future patients. However, despite their education and best intentions, lack of business acumen can hinder even the brightest and most motivated of practitioners. In order to enlighten oneself in the complicated field of business management, clinicians are left to fend for themselves, often learning as they go, sometimes making unnecessary mistakes, and adjusting their business practices reactively. Retrospective “trial and error” learning is time-consuming, cumbersome, and costly. Why not short track and get the goods without the trial and error, making costly mistakes and taking years. The new book, The Business of Dermatology is a cornerstone achievement in the standardization of business education for dermatologists.

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining a practice. To start, the power of this textbook fundamentally lies in the experience and scope of its authorship.

The authors were hand-selected by the editors ensuring that each chapter was written by a tried and true expert in that subject. Unlike other textbooks in the field of business management and administration that are primarily written by individuals from the business world, some of whom have no insight into the inner machinations of the medical world, or hands-on experience, the authors of this book are well-known, respected dermatologists that hail from thriving practices of their own. The reader has an unprecedented opportunity to learn from the firsthand experiences of top authorities who live and breathe dermatology. Using conversational prose, the authors depict their experiences, trials, and errors, employing specific real-world examples and scenarios while tackling each subject.

A notable forte of The Business of Dermatology is the sheer breadth and range of topics discussed in the textbook by medical as well as surgical dermatologists. Opening and managing a practice is a daunting endeavor with twists, turns, and hidden hurdles that one cannot foresee until stumbling across them. The Business of Dermatology unveils those twists, turns, and hurdles for the reader, taking the “guessing game” out of the equation. Fifty-five chapters elucidate every aspect of running a practice, covering all practice-relevant topics, including office space and equipment, managing financials, diverse practice models, human resources, employment considerations, patient issues, pricing, essential surgical tools/supplies, marketing, and much more. The Business of Dermatology lays bare every facet of handling a dermatologic practice, so much so that even a well-run, seasoned practice stands to learn new tools and tips to elevate itself to a higher level.

And now more than ever in the “Time of Covid” we are in desperate need of information from The Business of Dermatology. Many of us are inventing the wheel with the significant changes that are occurring in Dermatology, and the practice of our specialty.

The wealth of knowledge endowed in each chapter is written and formatted in such a style that renders each chapter extremely easy to read and comprehend. First, the prose used in the chapters is conversational – as such, the reader is fully immersed in each topic as if he/she were having a face-to-face chat with the authors. Furthermore, references are used only when absolutely necessary. The reader is not bogged down by superfluous references and discussions that may dim the vital discussion points of the chapters. Finally, embedded within each chapter are practical tips that are immediately implementable and a Top Ten list that highlights the key take-home points, making “reading on the run” possible. The novice practice owner need not fear the residency dogma of “trying to drink from a gushing fire hydrant” with this easy-to-read, catchy and focused textbook.

And now more than ever in the “Time of Covid” we are in desperate need of information from The Business of Dermatology. Many of us are inventing the wheel with the significant changes that are occurring in Dermatology, and the practice of our specialty.

The wealth of knowledge endowed in each chapter is written and formatted in such a style that renders each chapter extremely easy to read and comprehend. First, the prose used in the chapters is conversational – as such, the reader is fully immersed in each topic as if he/she were having a face-to-face chat with the authors. Furthermore, references are used only when absolutely necessary. The reader is not bogged down by superfluous references and discussions that may dim the vital discussion points of the chapters. Finally, embedded within each chapter are practical tips that are immediately implementable and a Top Ten list that highlights the key take-home points, making “reading on the run” possible. The novice practice owner need not fear the residency dogma of “trying to drink from a gushing fire hydrant” with this easy-to-read, catchy and focused textbook.

With a vast wealth of information relevant to the business side of a dermatology practice, this remarkable resource fills the gap between the training phase and acquisition of professional confidence. Every dermatologist, whether early in their career or well-seasoned, or in a solo practice or a large group, will benefit from this textbook. At a price of $89.99, The Business of Dermatology is affordable and accessible online and in-print – the 350 chapter pages of business wisdom are worth every cent. (And at $64.99 you can access just the digital version.)

Get Your Copy Today

The Business of Dermatology by Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla

 

You May Also Like

AestheticsFeatured Articles
September 28, 2020

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…
AestheticsFeatured Articles
September 14, 2020

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…
AestheticsFeatured ArticlesPhotoprotectionSkin of Color
September 9, 2020

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…

Controversies in Photoprotection

By Derm Community, ODAC, Photoprotection, Skin Cancer No Comments

Dermatology News

Video Pearls

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD is Professor and Interim Chair of Dermatology and serves as Residency Program Director, Director of Translational Research, and Director of the Supportive OncodermatologyProgram in the Department of Dermatology at The George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences. Dr. Friedman completed his undergraduate training at the University of Pennsylvania and graduated with Distinction in Dermatologic Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York.

Learn More

Controversies in Photoprotection

featuring Dr. Adam Friedman

Journal of Drugs in Dermatology partners Next Steps in Derm and ODAC Dermatology Aesthetic and Surgical Conference interviewed Dr. Adam Friedman, Professor, Interim Chair of Dermatology, and Residency Program Director at George Washington University, on some of the common misconceptions and controversies surrounding photoprotection.

Debunking Misconceptions on Photoprotection

While ample evidence has shown that sunscreen not only reduces the incidences of melanoma, it also helps prevent  accelerated skin aging, many misconceptions about sunscreen are preventing patients from using what we have available to them.

Watch as Dr. Friedman debunks some of the current myths surrounding photoprotection and provides guidance on what we should really pay attention to.

Explore Photoprotection Articles

ODAC Orlando Dermatology, Aesthetic & Surgical Conference

ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference (ODAC) is a distinguished ACCME accredited dermatology conference designed to meet the needs of medical and aesthetic dermatology providers in the 21st century. Founded in 2003 by dermatology pioneer, Dr. Perry Robins, the ODAC Dermatology Conference provides nearly 700 dermatologists, residents, nurse practitioners and physician assistants with important annual updates and fresh practical pearls in the field of medical, cosmetic and surgical dermatology in a highly interactive format.

Reasons to Attend ODAC 2021

  • Discuss the next generation of diagnostic approaches and evidence-based dermatology treatments
  • Observe cutting-edge procedures and techniques with live demonstrations of novel products and emerging technologies
  • Review clinical trial results and discuss case-studies in both large and small group settings
  • Cultivate relationships with colleagues and leaders actively shaping the future of dermatology
  • Earn CME –  up to 31 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™
Register for ODAC 2021 Now

You May Also Like

NEW Webinar – Differentiating Approach to Acne Therapy: Women Vs. Men

| JDD Webinars | No Comments
Join Leon H. Kircik, MD and Julie Harper, MD as they discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris. October 27th, 2020 7:00 PM - 8:00…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast | No Comments
Episode 2 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Why is is that we tend to do things…

Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?

By Derm Community, ODAC, Skin Cancer No Comments

Dermatology News

National Skin Cancer Month

The discussion was led by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda, and was moderated by Dr. William Hanke.

Learn More

Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs? Highlights from the 17th Annual ODAC Conference

In recognition of National Skin Cancer Month, the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology and our industry partners, Next Steps, are taking a look back at an engaging panel discussion, “Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?,” from the 17th Annual ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference in Orlando, Florida.

The case-based discussion examined the use of Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) versus other treatment modalities for non-melanoma skin cancers, Merkel cell carcinoma, and lentigo maligna.

Case I: Highlights

The first case described a 41-year-old Fitzpatrick type II female with two superficial basal cells on her right central cheek (5×7 mm) and right chin (6×8 mm). Mohs Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) score is 7 for both lesions, justifying MMS for both lesions. Pretty straightforward right?

Think again. Dr. Patel implored the use of topical immunotherapy with imiquimod for these lesions given a study by Williams et al. (1). This randomized clinical trial examined the interventions of either imiquimod 5% cream once daily (superficial basal cell carcinoma, 6 weeks; nodular basal cell carcinoma, 12 weeks) or excisional surgery (4-mm margin) on 3- and 5-year success rates. The 3-year success rate was defined as the clinical absence of initial failure or signs of recurrence at the 3-year dermatology review, and Five-year success was defined as 3-year success plus absence of recurrences identified through medical records. The 5-year success rates for imiquimod were 82.5% compared with 97.7% for surgery (relative risk of imiquimod success = 0.84, 95% confidence interval = 0.77-0.91, P < 0.001). These were comparable to year 3 success rates. Most imiquimod treatment failures occurred in year 1.

View More on Next Steps

This information was presented by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda at the 17th ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference held January 17th-20st, 2020 in Orlando, FL.

Further case highlights can be reviewed by visiting Next Steps in Derm.

More on Mohs

ODAC Orlando Dermatology, Aesthetic & Surgical Conference

ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference (ODAC) is a distinguished ACCME accredited dermatology conference designed to meet the needs of medical and aesthetic dermatology providers in the 21st century. Founded in 2003 by dermatology pioneer, Dr. Perry Robins, the ODAC Dermatology Conference provides nearly 700 dermatologists, residents, nurse practitioners and physician assistants with important annual updates and fresh practical pearls in the field of medical, cosmetic and surgical dermatology in a highly interactive format.

Reasons to Attend ODAC 2021

  • Discuss the next generation of diagnostic approaches and evidence-based dermatology treatments
  • Observe cutting-edge procedures and techniques with live demonstrations of novel products and emerging technologies
  • Review clinical trial results and discuss case-studies in both large and small group settings
  • Cultivate relationships with colleagues and leaders actively shaping the future of dermatology
  • Earn CME –  up to 31 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™
Register for ODAC 2021 Now

You May Also Like

NEW Webinar – Differentiating Approach to Acne Therapy: Women Vs. Men

| JDD Webinars | No Comments
Join Leon H. Kircik, MD and Julie Harper, MD as they discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris. October 27th, 2020 7:00 PM - 8:00…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast | No Comments
Episode 2 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Why is is that we tend to do things…

Melasma: Treatment Pearls from the Expert

By Derm Community, ODAC No Comments

Dermatology News

Video Pearls

E. Victor Ross, MD, is a dermatologist specializing in laser surgery of the skin. He uses a broad array of technologies to reduce red and brown skin lesions, wrinkles and unwanted hair, improve spider veins of the legs and improve the appearance of scars, including acne scars.

Learn More

Melasma: Treatment Pearls from the Expert

featuring Dr. Vic Ross

Journal of Drugs in Dermatology partners Next Steps in Derm and ODAC Dermatology Aesthetic and Surgical Conference interviewed Dr. Vic Ross, Director of the Scripps Clinic Laser and Cosmetic Dermatology Center in San Diego on his approach and the various interventions he uses for the treatment of Melasma.

More On Melasma

Melasma is a commonly condition that mostly affects women with Fitzpatrick skin types III-VI with prominent brown pigmentation with or without an underlying erythema. Treating Melasma is challenging, due to its chronic nature.

Explore Melasma Articles

ODAC Orlando Dermatology, Aesthetic & Surgical Conference

ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference (ODAC) is a distinguished ACCME accredited dermatology conference designed to meet the needs of medical and aesthetic dermatology providers in the 21st century. Founded in 2003 by dermatology pioneer, Dr. Perry Robins, the ODAC Dermatology Conference provides nearly 700 dermatologists, residents, nurse practitioners and physician assistants with important annual updates and fresh practical pearls in the field of medical, cosmetic and surgical dermatology in a highly interactive format.

Reasons to Attend ODAC 2021

  • Discuss the next generation of diagnostic approaches and evidence-based dermatology treatments
  • Observe cutting-edge procedures and techniques with live demonstrations of novel products and emerging technologies
  • Review clinical trial results and discuss case-studies in both large and small group settings
  • Cultivate relationships with colleagues and leaders actively shaping the future of dermatology
  • Earn CME –  up to 31 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™
Register for ODAC 2021 Now

You May Also Like

NEW Webinar – Differentiating Approach to Acne Therapy: Women Vs. Men

| JDD Webinars | No Comments
Join Leon H. Kircik, MD and Julie Harper, MD as they discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris. October 27th, 2020 7:00 PM - 8:00…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast | No Comments
Episode 2 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Why is is that we tend to do things…

Supportive Oncodermatology Interventions Improve Patient Quality of Life

By Derm Community, Skin Cancer No Comments

Dermatology News

National Skin Cancer Month

Enrollment in a supportive oncodermatology program is associated with a significantly improved quality of life score, according to a recent survey from the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center. The results of the survey were published in the May issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.

Read JDD Article Now

"Supportive Oncodermatology Interventions Improve Patient Quality of Life"

Enrollment in a supportive oncodermatology program is associated with a significantly improved quality of life score, according to a recent survey from the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center. The results of the survey were published in the May issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.

Improved Quality of Life

Supportive oncodermatology is a growing field that provides treatment and preventive care to oncology patients who experience adverse dermatologic events associated with their cancer treatments. While dermatologic health in cancer patients is gaining attention, the literature evaluating the impact of supportive oncodermatology clinics on patient quality of life is limited.

To identify the impact of these programs, the group at GW performed a cross-sectional survey of adult cancer patients enrolled at the Supportive Oncodermatology Clinic at GW Cancer Center. Those who met inclusion criteria were invited to complete an online survey with questions adapted from the Dermatology Life Quality Index and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire.

“Our results show that patient quality of life benefited significantly from enrollment in the clinic’s programs,” said Adam Friedman, MD, director of the GW Supportive Oncodermatology Clinic, interim chair of the Department of Dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and senior author on the study. “The supportive oncodermatology field is a critical element of multidisciplinary cancer care that addresses dermatologic wellness in cancer patients.”

The respondents reported satisfaction with the care they received at the GW Supportive Oncodermatology Clinic, especially in terms of providers’ interpersonal manner and communication and would recommend this type of care to other cancer patients.

Prior to receiving care at the clinic, patients had an average quality of life score of 6.5, indicating a “moderate effect” dermatologic adverse events have on quality of life. On average, scores were significantly reduced by 2.7 points after joining the clinic.

While patients reported overall satisfaction with dermatologic care, many reported being unsure if those interventions aided in adherence to anticancer treatment. Because of this, the authors pointed out, it is necessary to develop evidence-based management systems for dermatologic adverse effects.

The article, titled “The Influence of Supportive Oncodermatology Interventions on Patient Quality of Life: A Cross-Sectional Survey,” is published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology and is available at jddonline.com/articles/dermatology/S1545961620P0477X.

You May Also Like

NEW Webinar – Differentiating Approach to Acne Therapy: Women Vs. Men

| JDD Webinars | No Comments
Join Leon H. Kircik, MD and Julie Harper, MD as they discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris. October 27th, 2020 7:00 PM - 8:00…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast | No Comments
Episode 2 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Why is is that we tend to do things…

#ShareTheFacts About Skin Cancer

By Derm Community, Skin Cancer No Comments

Dermatology News

National Skin Cancer Month

Dermatologists play an important role in helping to save lives, by educating patients, and the public, on skin cancer prevention; the dangers of unprotected exposure, and how to detect early warning signs.

#ShareTheFacts About Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, but is also one of the most preventable.

Dermatologists play an important role in helping to save lives, by educating patients, and the public, on skin cancer prevention; the dangers of unprotected exposure; and how to detect early warning signs  –  early detection means a high probability of eliminating it entirely.

#ShareTheFacts

This month, the Skin Cancer Foundation invites providers to #sharethefacts on skin cancer by accessing its set of downloadable images and resources to help patients stay informed on skin cancer treatment and prevention.

Visit the Skin Cancer Foundation to learn more about its #ShareTheFacts campaign, and how you can help.

Learn More

You May Also Like

NEW Webinar – Differentiating Approach to Acne Therapy: Women Vs. Men

| JDD Webinars | No Comments
Join Leon H. Kircik, MD and Julie Harper, MD as they discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris. October 27th, 2020 7:00 PM - 8:00…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast Highlights, Skin Cancer | No Comments
iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

| Podcast | No Comments
Episode 2 of a 2-Part Series: "Sun Protection: A Review of Current Interventions and Barriers to Changing Patient Attitude and Behavior" Why is is that we tend to do things…

GW Announces Virtual Learning Opportunity

By Derm Community, Education, Global Health No Comments

DC Academy of Dermatology

 

The George Washington University School of Medical and Health Sciences has announced it will host a Virtual academy meeting on March 23rd.

GW’s Department of Dermatology Reception has cancelled its reception at the annual American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) meeting after officials have implemented health mandates across the globe in response to the rapidly evolving pandemic.

“In light of the COVID-19 pandemic and the graphic impact on educational programing, we have responded to this challenge by utilizing online learning to bring you the DC Academy of Dermatology (DCAD). This 7-hour virtual learning event will include case studies, presentations, and board review.  The “live” event will be available only to residents, with additional webcasts available to all.”

Join the DC Academy of Dermatology of their inaugural meeting of the DC Academy of Dermatology on Monday March 23rd from 8:30am-3:30pm.

Led by Dr. Adam Friedman and hosted by The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences and in collaboration with Dermatology In-Review and supported by EPI Health, SanovaWorks, and La Roche-Posay USA.

Learn More

You May Also Like

Derm Community
June 16, 2020

A Must-Read: The Business of Dermatology

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining…
Derm CommunityODACPhotoprotectionSkin Cancer
June 1, 2020

Controversies in Photoprotection

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD is Professor and Interim Chair of Dermatology and serves as Residency Program Director, Director of Translational Research, and Director of the Supportive OncodermatologyProgram in the Department…
Derm CommunityODACSkin Cancer
May 18, 2020

Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?

The discussion was led by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda, and was moderated by Dr. William Hanke. In recognition of National Skin Cancer Month, the Journal of Drugs…

Global Pandemic: A Statement from the JDD

By Derm Community, Global Health No Comments

Dear JDD readers and colleagues,

The global COVID-19 pandemic has greatly impacted our lives: how we gather and connect has changed to ensure the health and safety of our communities.
During this time, as researchers, health professionals, and scientists around the world collaborate to develop solutions to protect our global community, the JDD has committed to continuing to publish the latest research, updates, and information to help providers better serve patients.
To support community collaboration, the JDD has premiered an online blog where registered users may comment and connect with other dermatology professionals to share information and learn: www.jddonline.com/jdd-blog.
Additionally, stay up-to-date with the latest developments by following JDD on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn.
The JDD is committed to providing timely information pertaining to new methods, techniques, drug therapies and devices to our dedicated community of healthcare professionals.

We thank you for your continued support, and wish you all well.

Stay Connected

You May Also Like

Derm Community
June 16, 2020

A Must-Read: The Business of Dermatology

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining…
Derm CommunityODACPhotoprotectionSkin Cancer
June 1, 2020

Controversies in Photoprotection

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD is Professor and Interim Chair of Dermatology and serves as Residency Program Director, Director of Translational Research, and Director of the Supportive OncodermatologyProgram in the Department…
Derm CommunityODACSkin Cancer
May 18, 2020

Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?

The discussion was led by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda, and was moderated by Dr. William Hanke. In recognition of National Skin Cancer Month, the Journal of Drugs…

Long Term Use of Novel Therapeutic for Topical Treatment of Primary Axillary Hyperhidrosis in Pediatric Subjects

By Derm Community No Comments

Source: ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic & Surgical Conference (ODAC) Discovery in Dermatology Poster Session

At the 17th Annual ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic, and Surgical Conference (ODAC) held January 17-20 in Orlando, FL, Brandon Kirsch, MD, Janet DuBois, MD, Martin N. Zaiac, MD and Deepak Chadha, MS, MBA, RAC presented scientific research of long term data with a novel therapeutic for topical treatment of primary axillary hyperhidrosis in pediatric subjects.

Discovery in Dermatology

The use of retro-metabolically designed drugs in dermatology is novel and has the potential for providing significant therapeutic benefit to pediatric and adult patients.

Sofpironium bromide is an ester analogue of glycopyrrolate that inhibits muscarinic receptors in sweat glands. It was developed according to the principles of retro-metabolic drug design, in which the goal is to create an active compound that is metabolized in vivo to an inactive moiety in a single, predictable reaction. Retro-metabolically designed drugs are rapidly metabolized in the bloodstream, potentially allowing for optimal therapeutic effect at application sites with minimal systemic side effects.

Introduction

~2.1% of the US population aged <18 years has primary hyperhidrosis (HH); ~65% have axillary HH. Long-term safety/tolerability and efficacy of topical HH treatments have rarely been studied in pediatric patients. Sofpironium bromide is a retro-metabolically designed analog of glycopyrrolate (anticholinergic) in development for topical treatment of primary axillary HH. Absorbed drug is rapidly metabolized, potentially allowing optimal local therapeutic effect with minimal systemic effects..

Procedures

21 of 25 subjects (age 9-16 yrs) with primary axillary HH of ≥6 months duration, completing a previous 1-week safety and pharmacokinetic (PK) study (BBI-4000-CL-105), were enrolled. Objectives were to assess safety/tolerability and PK, and explore efficacy of sofpironium bromide gel, 15% applied to both axillae for 24 weeks.

Results

Mean age (SD) 13.3 (2.29) years. 16 subjects completed this 24-week study. 7 had treatment emergent adverse events (TEAEs); 4 with AEs related to study drug, including expected systemic anticholinergic AEs (blurred vision, dry mouth, dry eyes, mydriasis) and local events (pain, pruritus, rash, erythema). 2 subjects discontinued due to TEAEs, including dry eye, dry mouth, local pruritus, local rash. The majority (52.4%) of subjects did not have any local symptoms/signs, and none observed were severe in nature. PK did not show evidence of drug/major metabolite accumulation, with most subjects having concentrations not quantifiable. The validated patient-reported outcome, Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Measure-Axillary (HDSM-Ax), showed mean (SD) change from baseline (from previous study) to Week 24 of this study of -1.91 (1.038). A -1.00 change shows clinically meaningful improvement.

Conclusion

In this 24-week study in pediatric subjects sofpironium bromide, 15% was safe/well tolerated. Majority of subjects had no TEAE, and there were no severe or serious AEs. There was no evidence of drug accumulation. There was indication of clinically meaningful improvement in axillary HH.

Be an expert among experts, join the JDD at ODAC to hear from the esteemed faculty members featured in top media outlets.

Learn more

You May Also Like

Derm Community
June 16, 2020

A Must-Read: The Business of Dermatology

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining…
Derm CommunityODACPhotoprotectionSkin Cancer
June 1, 2020

Controversies in Photoprotection

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD is Professor and Interim Chair of Dermatology and serves as Residency Program Director, Director of Translational Research, and Director of the Supportive OncodermatologyProgram in the Department…
Derm CommunityODACSkin Cancer
May 18, 2020

Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?

The discussion was led by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda, and was moderated by Dr. William Hanke. In recognition of National Skin Cancer Month, the Journal of Drugs…

2019 Scientific Poster Abstracts from Skin of Color Update

By Derm Community

Education Credits

September 12: 8.5 | September 13 = 4.5

Category 1
Creighton University Health Sciences Continuing Education designates this live activity for a maximum of 13 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) TM. Physicians should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

AAPA accepts AMA category 1 credit for the PRA from organizations accredited by ACCME

Nurse CE
Creighton University Health Sciences Continuing Education designates this activity for 13 contact hours for nurses.  Nurses should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

View a selection of scientific poster abstracts from the 2019 Skin of Color Update below.

SOCU is the largest CE event dedicated to trending evidence-based research and new practical pearls for treating skin types III – VI, will be held  held September 12 – 13 at the Sheraton Times Square in New York City.

Each year, SOCU presents exclusive content and learning opportunities on topics including,  Acne, Rosacea, Psoriasis, Scalp Psoriasis, Skin Cancer, Atopic Dermatitis, Hidradenitis Suppurativa, Nail and Fungal Disorders, and how they affect the patient of color.

 

Impact of High Coverage Make-up Coverage against Visible Light Exposure

Historically, photo-protection studies have focused on UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm) protection. However, it is now evident that visible light (400-700 nm) causes skin darkening and contribute to worsening of dyschromia, particularly in individuals with Fitzpatrick phototype III and higher.

View Now

Twenty Nail Dystrophy; a case report from DISHARC, Nepal

Twenty-nail dystrophy (TND) is rare and less reported chronic inflammatory disorder affecting nail matrix of all twenty nails. Literature reports mainly as idiopathic but are also associated with cutaneous or systemic disorders among childhood. It clinically presents as rough, thin, brittle lustureless nails with multiple pits. The diagnosis was made clinically but pathological study shows spongiosis and exocytosis of inflammatory cells in epithelium.

View Now

Treatment of Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia: A Retrospective Chart Review

Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia (CCCA) is a highly debilitating form of scarring hair loss which primarily affects African American women. There is a lack of data regarding treatment options for patients with CCCA, and therefore, investigation of therapies and responses to these therapies is warranted.

View Now

A Rare Case of Lipedematous Scalp in an African American Female

This case presents a 55-year old African American female referred to dermatology for an evaluation of hair loss predominantly at the vertex of a 2-year duration. She reported tenderness of the scalp but denied pruritus. Her exam showed a boggy, tender, non-scaly scalp with minimal perifollicular erythema at the vertex.

View Now

Cysteamine- Towards A Novel First Line Treatment for Melasma?

Kligman’s formula, consisting of hydroquinone, retinoic acid and a corticosteroid remains to date the dermatologist’s treatment of choice for melasma. However, side effects and draw-backs such as ochronosis, skin atrophy, irritation, photosensitivity and post inflammatory hyperpigmentation are significant.

View Now

Influences of therapeutic choices and treatment outcome in acne vulgaris among patients in South Nigeria

Acne Vulgaris (AV), a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin and hair follicles is one of the most common reasons to present to the dermatologist. In Nigeria, as with most parts of the world, patients will typically present when they have persistent or worsening lesions and following treatment trial with over the counter (OTC) medications and suggestions from concerned individuals.

View Now

Learn more about this the 2020 SOCU conference here and register today!

Skin of Color Update 2020, Largest CE Event Dedicated to Treatment of Skin Types III – VI, Announces Program and Faculty

By Derm Community No Comments

Education Credits

September 12: 8.5 | September 13 = 4.5

Category 1
Creighton University Health Sciences Continuing Education designates this live activity for a maximum of 13 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) TM. Physicians should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

AAPA accepts AMA category 1 credit for the PRA from organizations accredited by ACCME

Nurse CE
Creighton University Health Sciences Continuing Education designates this activity for 13 contact hours for nurses.  Nurses should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Skin of Color Update 2020 is the largest CE event dedicated to trending evidence-based research and new practical pearls for treating skin types III – VI. The 2020 event will be held September 12 – 13 at a new location, the Sheraton Times Square in New York City.

Skin of Color Update uses a didactic, case-based approach through lectures, hands-on-training and live demonstrations. Sessions will address medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. A few sessions this year include:

  • “Conventional and New Treatment Options for Keloids (including LADD) – Expert Panel” with Maritza Perez, MD and Jared Jagdeo, MD
  • Laser Staples & The New Players: Brand Loyalty Aside, This is What the Experts Want You to Know- Panel Conversation” with Eliot Battle, MD, Maritza Perez, MD and Andrew Alexis, MD
  • “Clinical Pearls for Kids, Tweens and Teens with Skin of Color” with Candrice Heath, MD
  • “Hot Topics & Controversies in Photoprotection: Making Sense of it All” with Amy McMichael, MD
  • Hair & Scalp Disorders in SOC: Conventional Treatment Approaches” with Susan Taylor, MD
  • “Dermatologic Concerns, Diseases, and Treatments Unique to Asian Skin” with Hye Jin Chung, MD, MMS
  • Consensus and Misconceptions Regarding the Aesthetic Skin of Color Patient: A Conversation with the Experts” with Andrew Alexis, MD and Maritza Perez, MD
  • “Keys to Connecting with Skin of Color Patients on Social Media” with Candrice Heath, MD
  • “New and Emerging Treatments in Vitiligo

The full agenda can be viewed at skinofcolorupdate.com/agenda

The conference will also offer an exhibit hall featuring companies showcasing the latest innovations in dermatology. A poster session will also be available and up to 13 AMA PRA Category 1™ credit(s) can be earned. Registration is available at skinofcolorupdate.com.

You May Also Like

Derm Community
June 16, 2020

A Must-Read: The Business of Dermatology

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining…
Derm CommunityODACPhotoprotectionSkin Cancer
June 1, 2020

Controversies in Photoprotection

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD is Professor and Interim Chair of Dermatology and serves as Residency Program Director, Director of Translational Research, and Director of the Supportive OncodermatologyProgram in the Department…
Derm CommunityODACSkin Cancer
May 18, 2020

Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?

The discussion was led by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda, and was moderated by Dr. William Hanke. In recognition of National Skin Cancer Month, the Journal of Drugs…

Dr. Susan Weinkle Recognized as Outstanding Educator & Mentor in Dermatology at ODAC 2020

By Derm Community No Comments

Dr. Susan H. Weinkle was awarded the Outstanding Educator & Mentor in Dermatology Award by the ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic & Surgical Conference  for her commitment to educating and mentoring the next generation of dermatologists.

“Physicians around the globe have learned so much from Dr. Susan Weinkle. [Dr. Weinkle] has given all of us in aesthetics so much of her time and energy, and I am honored to present this award to her,” says Joel Cohen, M.D., and ODAC vice conference chair.

Dr. Weinkle currently serves as assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the University of South Florida, Tampa, Fla, and is in private practices in Bradenton, Fla., where she specializes in Mohs Micrographic Surgery and cosmetic dermatology.

A past president of the Women’s Dermatological Society and the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Dr. Weinkle is also the former  committee chair and member of the board of directors of several dermatology organizations, including the American Academy of Dermatology, Dermatology Foundation, and Florida Society of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery.

Award recipients are nominated and chosen by a committee of thought leaders in dermatology, as well as dermatology practitioners. The award is presented at ODAC in partnership with the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD).

Learn More

You May Also Like

Derm Community
June 16, 2020

A Must-Read: The Business of Dermatology

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining…
Derm CommunityODACPhotoprotectionSkin Cancer
June 1, 2020

Controversies in Photoprotection

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD is Professor and Interim Chair of Dermatology and serves as Residency Program Director, Director of Translational Research, and Director of the Supportive OncodermatologyProgram in the Department…
Derm CommunityODACSkin Cancer
May 18, 2020

Does This Skin Cancer Really Need Mohs?

The discussion was led by Dr. Vishal Patel and Dr. Sailesh Konda, and was moderated by Dr. William Hanke. In recognition of National Skin Cancer Month, the Journal of Drugs…