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Aesthetics

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

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A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

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A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (“Efficacy and Tolerability of a Skin Brightening/Anti-Aging Cosmeceutical Containing Retinol 0.5%, Niacinamide, Hexylresorcinol, and Resveratrol“), which was recently cited in an article on Prevention.com, suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection. 

Patricia Farris MD, Joshua Zeichner MD, and Diane Berson MD

 

Consumers are increasingly interested in over-the-counter skin care products that can improve the appearance of photodamaged and aging skin. This 10-week, open-label, single- center study enrolled 25 subjects with mild to moderate hyperpigmentation and other clinical stigmata of cutaneous aging including fine lines, sallowness, lack of clarity, and wrinkling. Their mean age was 53.4±7.7 years. The test product contained retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide 4.4%, resveratrol 1%, and hexylresorcinol 1.1% in a moisturizing base. Subjects were provided a skin care regimen including a cleanser, hydrating serum, moisturizer, and an SPF 30 sunscreen for daily use. The test product was applied only at night.

The use of this skin brightening/anti-aging cosmeceutical was found to provide statistically significant improvements in all efficacy endpoints by study end. Fine lines, radiance, and smoothness were significantly improved as early as week 2 (P<.001). By week 4, hyperpigmentation, overall skin clarity, evenness of skin tone, and wrinkles showed statistically significant improvement compared to baseline. Mild retinoid dermatitis including flaking and redness occurred early in the study as reflected by tolerability scores. By week 10, subjects reported no stinging, itching, dryness, or tingling.

The results of this open-label clinical study suggest that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

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A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Biological Effects of Hyaluronic Acid-Based Dermal Fillers and Laser Therapy on Human Skin Models

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This study investigates the molecular effects of different stabilized HA and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-based fillers with and without subsequent additional fractional laser co-treatment.

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This study investigates the molecular effects of different stabilized HA and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-based fillers with and without subsequent additional fractional laser co-treatment.

Laura Huth PhD, Yvonne Marquardt, Ruth Heise PhD, Katharina Fietkau, Jens Malte Baron MD, Sebastian Huth PhD

 

Injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal fillers is one of the most frequently performed aesthetic procedures. HA fillers exist in many different formulations differing in HA concentration, particle size and cross-linking density.

While HA fillers with high-density and large particles are recommended for deep dermal injections, fillers with low-density and small particles are more commonly used for fine lines.

The direct biological effects of dermal fillers monotherapy and combination therapy with ablative fractional CO2- or Er:YAG laser irradiation on human skin cells are not completely understood. Organotypic three-dimensional (3D) skin equivalents have been established for standardized studies of the human skin.

The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular effects of different stabilized HA and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-based fillers with and without subsequent additional fractional laser co-treatment.

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

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A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin.

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Improvements in skin health is a well-researched benefit of taking collagen – in fact, according to a January 2019 Journal of Drugs in Dermatology study, (recently featured in an Every Day Health article, ” 8 Potential Benefits of Collagen – and 1 Thing it Can’t Do”), 800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin.

Franchesca D. Choi BS RPh, Calvin T. Sung BS, Margit L.W. Juhasz MD, Natasha Atanaskova Mesinkovska MD PhD

Nutrition is thought to play an important role in skin homeostasis. The use of nutraceuticals or “functional foods” in skincare along with technological innovations within the food industry has been rising.

In 2016, the collagen market was valued at an estimated 3.71 billion USD and is projected to reach 6.63 billion USD by 2025. Collagen supplements, originating from various sources (eg, porcine, bovine, marine) and available in numerous formulations (eg, protein, gelatin, hydrolysate, peptides), are marketed as improving skin integrity and modulating skin aging.

However, even with this increase in patient interest and market share, the use of collagen supplementation in dermatology remains controversial due to the lack of regulation on quality and quantity of ingredients in over-the-counter collagen supplements, as well as minimal peer-reviewed literature on the subject. Fortunately, there are increasing numbers of clinical studies regarding potential effects of collagen-based dietary supplements on skin.

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

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A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

By Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Photoprotection, Skin of Color No Comments

Featured Article

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In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen.

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In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen.

Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl E Grimes MD, Stephen Lynch PhD, Kalli Ji PhD, Manisha Brahmachary PhD, Qian Zheng Md PhD, Charbel Bouez PhD, Janet Wangari-Talbot PhD

 

 

Visible light (400–700nm), which contributes to 45% of solar radiation, contributes to skin darkening and worsening of dyschromias, particularly in individuals with Fitzpatrick skin phototypes III and higher.

The pathogenesis of melasma is incompletely understood, which poses a challenge for disease management. Causative factors include genetics, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, cosmetics, pregnancy, hormonal therapy, phototoxic drugs, and various medications.

Currently, sunscreens provide limited protection against that spectrum. Due to their capabilities in absorbing, scattering, and reflecting visible light, topical products containing pigments and/or metal oxides can provide additional photoprotection.

In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Expert grading and colorimetry demonstrated that the iron-oxide containing formulations significantly protected against visible light-induced pigmentation compared to untreated skin or mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen in Fitzpatrick IV individuals.

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Open Access Articles

The Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD) presents Open Access content, unrestricted access to our original articles, award-winning case studies, clinical trial reviews and clearance updates, drugs and devices, and special content geared toward medical residents and other allied health professionals.
Articles are reviewed by the Editorial Board of renowned experts, from key opinion leaders to well-known clinicians. View our open-access dermatology articles now.
View All Open Access Articles

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

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CME Activities

Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.

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Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.

As the aging US population is growing, minimally invasive strategies have become the primary treatment modalities for addressing mild to moderate age-related facial changes. The introduction of microfocused ultrasound (MFU) represents a method to produce a deeper wound healing response with increased collagen remodeling and more durable clinical response. MFU-V treatment protocols continue to be refined and use in combination with other minimally invasive strategies including injectable dermal fillers such as diluted calcium hydroxylapatite for skin laxity and appearance of lines in the neck and décolletage has been studied.

Need exists for expanded understanding of dermatology providers on the application of microfocused ultrasound in combination with injectable dermal fillers as a treatment approach for lifting skin on the neck and face and for improving lines and wrinkles on the chest

CME Certificate Information

  • This CME examination requires a 70% pass mark to receive the CME credit and certificate.
  • This activity is supported by an educational grant provided by Galderma Laboratories, L.P.

Upon completion of this continuing education activity participants should be able to:

  • Summarize the mechanism of action of high-resolution ultrasound imaging (MFU-V) for lifting skin on the neck and face, improving lines and wrinkles on the chest and improving collagen synthesis
  • Identify patients best suited for treatment with MFU-V in combination with injectable dermal fillers
  • Compare features, benefits, and safety profile MFU-V treatment in lifting skin on the neck and face and for improving lines and wrinkles on the chest
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Facial Skin Tightening With Microfocused Ultrasound and Dermal Fillers: Considerations for Patient Selection and Outcomes

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Earn 1.0 CME Credit: Human facial aging is a gradual and ongoing process involving various factors including photodamage, skin laxity, volume loss of subcutaneous tissue, and bony resorption.1 CME CreditHuman…

Expiring Soon: Capturing Consensus and Cutting Out Misconceptions regarding the Aesthetic Skin of Color Consumer

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0.5 CME Credits Who knows what’s best/worst for facial aesthetics in the skin of color patient? No really who? Because there is a great deal of folklore and ballyhoo related…

Re-examining the Optimal Use of Neuromodulators and the Changing Landscape: A Consensus Panel Update

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1 CME CreditSince initial US Food and Drug Administration approval of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) for aesthetic use in 2002, clinical evidence and experience with BoNT-A and understanding of…

The Therapeutic Use of Antioxidants for Melasma

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With a well demonstrated impact on quality of life, melasma is a common cause for seeking dermatologic care. There is no universally efficacious therapy, so combination treatment is preferred. Therapies include topical hypopigmenting agents, laser treatment, microneedling, chemical peels, radiofrequency, and oral medications.1 Furthermore, it is critical for patients to avoid exacerbating factors.

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In this review, authors discuss the well-defined role of oxidative stress in melasma and the therapeutic efficacy of various antioxidants for patients suffering from melasma, focusing on studies investigating the role of vitamin C, azelaic acid, cysteamine, glutathione, carotenoids, and numerous other antioxidants in disorders of hyperpigmentation.

Kayla M. Babbush BS, Remy A. Babbush BS, Amor Khachemoune MD FAAD FACMS

 

Melasma is a chronic and acquired skin disorder of hyperpigmentation that presents with symmetric hypermelanosis of sun exposed areas, especially the face. Disease prevalence, ranging from 1 to 50%, varies with gender, ethnicity, skin phenotype, and sun exposure.

The pathogenesis of melasma is incompletely understood, which poses a challenge for disease management. Causative factors include genetics, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, cosmetics, pregnancy, hormonal therapy, phototoxic drugs, and various medications.

Melasma is evaluated by Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI) score, modified MASI (mMASI) score, Melasma Quality of Life Scale (MelasQoL), colorimetry, and mexametry.

With a well demonstrated impact on quality of life, melasma is a common cause for seeking dermatologic care. There is no universally efficacious therapy, so combination treatment is preferred. Therapies include topical hypopigmenting agents, laser treatment, microneedling, chemical peels, radiofrequency, and oral medications.1 Furthermore, it is critical for patients to avoid exacerbating factors.

The skin, a protective organ critical in homeostasis, is the site of numerous biochemical processes, including the generation of free radicals, namely reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are necessary for biological signaling processes, but, in excess, ROS can damage biomolecules.3 There is clear evidence of oxidative stress in melasma.

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

Increased Trend of Cosmetic Procedures in Patients With Psoriasis Who Attain 75% or Greater Improvement

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A survey was conducted at a single dermatology center to determine if there was an increased trend in cosmetic procedures in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis who attained 75% or greater reduction of the body surface area (BSA) with biologic agents and oral systemic therapies, and if this was related to an improvement in quality of life following psoriasis clearance.

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A survey was conducted at a single dermatology center to determine if there was an increased trend in cosmetic procedures in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis who attained 75% or greater reduction of the body surface area (BSA) with biologic agents and oral systemic therapies, and if this was related to an improvement in quality of life following psoriasis clearance.

Michelle E. Walters MD, Delphine J. Lee MD PhD, Paul S. Yamauchi MD PhD

Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition with a negative impact on patient quality of life. The National Psoriasis Foundation states that an acceptable response to psoriasis treatment is at least a 75% reduction in body surface area (BSA) at 3 months after initiation of treatment.

This reduction in BSA has been associated with improvement in quality of life, with clearance rates of clear to almost clear leading to an even greater improvement in quality of life.2,3 To date, there have been no studies examining the relationship between improvement in quality of life following a reduction in BSA, and the increased utilization of cosmetic procedures. Here, we examine the relationship between quality of life and the use of various cosmetic procedures in patients treated for psoriasis with systemic and biologic therapies who achieved at least 75% reduction in BSA.

This was a retrospective study assessing quality of life and the use of cosmetic procedures in psoriasis patients after attaining a75% or greater reduction of the body surface area with biologic agents only, systemic agents only, or a combination of both. This study was conducted according to the ethical guidelines of the 1975 Declaration of Helsinki. All patients provided informed consent.

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

What are the Skincare Benefits of Niacinamide?

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles | No Comments
A 2016 study from Journal of Drugs in Dermatology suggests that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin…

Oral Collagen Supplementation: A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications

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800 patients who took up to 10 grams of collagen per day, experienced improvement in skin elasticity, moisture retention, and increased density of collagen fibers in the skin. Improvements in…

An Analysis of Skin of Color Dermatology Related Content on Instagram

By Aesthetics, Skin of Color No Comments

Skin of Color Update

Featured Article

Patients are utilizing internet resources and social media to learn of dermatologic conditions and possible treatments. However, no studies about skin of color dermatology content available on different social media platforms have been done.

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An Analysis of Skin of Color Dermatology Related Content on Instagram

Taylor M Wells BS, Chandler W Rundle MD, Mindy D Szeto BS, Colby Presley , Robert P Dellavalle MD PhD MSPH

 

The population of the United States is becoming increasingly more diverse. The most recent US census showed that while non-Hispanic whites currently make up the majority of the population at 198 million, they remain the only segment of the US population in which deaths outpace the number of births. At the same time, other racial and ethnic groups are experiencing population growth.1 In fact, it is projected that by 2050, over half the US population will be individuals of color.

The lack of dermatologists of color combined with the small percent of dermatologic education dedicated to patients with skin of color3 has created racial disparity in the delivery of care to patients of color. Gorbatenko-Roth et al has confirmed that patients of color are concerned that race-discordant dermatologists do not have specific knowledge of their skin and hair conditions and/ or routine skin and hair care regimens. Additionally, there is concern that these dermatologists do not offer individualized treatments for their disorders.2

Initiatives such as the Diversity Champion Initiative of the AAD’s Diversity Task Force, aimed at diversifying dermatology and increasing exposure to skin of color dermatology during training, have been implemented but these changes are systemic and slower to take effect.4

In the interim, patients are utilizing internet resources and social media to learn of dermatologic conditions and possible treatments. However, no studies about skin of color dermatology content available on different social media platforms have been done. Here, we sought to explore Instagram to identify skin of color-related dermatology content being posted, characterize the generators of this content, and compare the characteristics of content generated by board certified dermatologists with other Instagram users.

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Skin of Color Update Virtual

The Experts’ Forum for Multicultural Dermatology

The US population is growing and evolving and the clinical profile of the average patient presenting to the dermatologist is changing. One in three Americans self-identify as member of a non-caucasian racial or ethnic group. Data shows as of 2020, individuals of non-Caucasian, multi-racial descent will comprise more than 50% of the population.

Skin of Color Update Virtual 2020 Topics

 

  • Hair Loss
  • Acne
  • Rosacea
  • Skin Care with Cosmeceuticals
  • PRP
  • Psoriasis
  • Scalp Psoriasis
  • Skin Cancer
  • and more!
Register for SOCU 2020 Now

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Impact of Iron-Oxide Containing Formulations Against Visible Light-Induced Skin Pigmentation in Skin of Color Individuals

| Aesthetics, Featured Articles, Photoprotection, Skin of Color | No Comments
In this study, the efficacy of two formulations containing iron oxide was evaluated in preventing visible light-induced pigmentation compared with a non-tinted mineral SPF 50+ sunscreen. Hawasatu Dumbuya PhD, Pearl…

View the Latest Skin of Color, Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology Articles Now

| JDD Highlights, Skin of Color | No Comments
The July issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Skin of Color, with special features on Anti-Aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.…

An Analysis of Skin of Color Dermatology Related Content on Instagram

| Aesthetics, Skin of Color | No Comments
Patients are utilizing internet resources and social media to learn of dermatologic conditions and possible treatments. However, no studies about skin of color dermatology content available on different social media…

Impact of High Coverage Make-up Coverage against Visible Light Exposure

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Skin of Color Update

Featured Poster Abstract

The following is a selected scientific poster abstract from the 2019 Skin of Color Update.

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"Impact of High Coverage Make-up Coverage against Visible Light Exposure"

Authors: Hawasatu Dumbuya, PhD & Janet Wangari-Talbot, PhD

The following is a selected scientific poster abstract from the 2019 Skin of Color Update.

Historically, photo-protection studies have focused on UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm) protection. However, it is now evident that visible light (400-700 nm) causes skin darkening and contribute to worsening of dyschromia, particularly in individuals with Fitzpatrick phototype III and higher.

Currently, few sunscreens provide protection against visible light. Due to their capabilities in absorbing and reflecting visible light, topical products containing pigments and/or metal oxides (i.e. iron oxide, zinc oxide, and titanium dioxide), can provide additional protection against harmful effects of that spectrum.

Here, we demonstrate that lightly or darkly tinted high coverage pigmented foundation containing iron oxides or a combination of iron oxide and titanium dioxide significantly protected against visible light-induced pigmentation when compared to a mineral SPF50+ sunscreen in Fitzpatrick IV individuals when assessed by visual grading and by chromameter.

Our results show the benefits of high coverage pigmented foundation, containing different concentrations of iron oxide and titanium dioxide, in offering visible light photoprotection. Depending on the metal oxides concentrations, these formulations have the potential to extend protection beyond UV for multiple skin phototypes.

Skin of Color Scientific Poster Abstracts

View a curated selection of scientific poster abstracts from the Skin of Color Update conference below.

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Skin of Color Update Virtual

The Experts’ Forum for Multicultural Dermatology

The US population is growing and evolving and the clinical profile of the average patient presenting to the dermatologist is changing. One in three Americans self-identify as member of a non-caucasian racial or ethnic group. Data shows as of 2020, individuals of non-Caucasian, multi-racial descent will comprise more than 50% of the population.

Skin of Color Update Virtual 2020 Topics

 

  • Hair Loss
  • Acne
  • Rosacea
  • Skin Care with Cosmeceuticals
  • PRP
  • Psoriasis
  • Scalp Psoriasis
  • Skin Cancer
  • and more!
Register for SOCU 2020 Now

You May Also Like

View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

| Featured Articles, JDD Highlights | No Comments
The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

NEW Webinar – Differentiating Approach to Acne Therapy: Women Vs. Men

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Join Leon H. Kircik, MD and Julie Harper, MD as they discuss the mechanisms by which androgen/AR regulate sebocyte activity in acne vulgaris. October 27th, 2020 7:00 PM - 8:00…

Understanding and Changing Patient Behavior and Minimizing Risk of UV Damage

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iTunes Google Play Stitcher TuneIn Drs. Sherry Pagoto and Adam Friedman   Why is is that we tend to do things we know are bad for us? Candy, alcohol, Tinder...the…

Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Repeat-Dose Injections of IncobotulinumtoxinA in the Treatment of Upper Facial Lines: Results from a Prospective, Open-Label, Phase III Study

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Dermatology News

"Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Repeat-Dose Injections of IncobotulinumtoxinA in the Treatment of Upper Facial Lines: Results from a Prospective, Open-Label, Phase III Study"

IncobotulinumtoxinA (Xeomin/Xeomeen/Bocouture/XEOMIN Cosmetic; botulinum toxin type A free from complexing proteins [150 kDa]; Merz Pharmaceuticals GmbH) is indicated worldwide for the correction of glabellar frown lines (GFL) and in Europe additionally for lateral periorbital lines (LPL; crow’s feet) and upper facial lines (UFL; ie, simultaneous treatment of GFL, LPL, and horizontal forehead lines [HFL]).1

The efficacy of incobotulinumtoxinA in the treatment of multiple or singular facial areas has been extensively demonstrated.2-10 With the recent surge in interest for a more holistic approach, consisting of combined treatment of GFL, HFL, and LPL in a single treatment session, there is a need for demonstrating safety and efficacy for such procedures.

This study provides strong evidence for the safety and tolerability of repeat-dose treatments with incobotulinumtoxinA in UFL (GFL, 20 U; HFL, 10-20 U; LPL, 24 U). A stable safety profile was demonstrated during prolonged administration and a noteworthy trend to better tolerability with continued use of incobotulinumtoxinA was established

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View the Latest Discoveries in Atopic Dermatitis, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The October issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on atopic dermatitis with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

View the Latest Discoveries in Aesthetics, Anti-Aging, and Medical Dermatology

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The September issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on aesthetic treatments, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical…

The Latest Research & Discoveries in Psoriasis, Anti-Aging, Aesthetics, and Medical Dermatology

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The August issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology is available now. This month, we focus on Psoriasis, with special features on Public Health, Anti-aging, Aesthetic, and Medical Dermatology.…