FULL SUPPLEMENT: Targeted Antibiotic for Acne: A Path for Antimicrobial Stewardship

November 2020 | Volume 19 | Issue 11 | Department | s11 | Copyright © November 2020


Published online October 23, 2020

Leon H. Kircik MD, April W. Armstrong , Joshua Hekmatjah BS

aDepartment of Dermatology, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA bWestern Michigan University, Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, MI cIcahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY; Skin Sciences, PLLC, Louisville, KY

Abstract
Dermatologists consistently rank as the most frequent prescribers of systemic antibiotics, and one of the most common diagnoses for which we recommend these agents is acne vulgaris. Up to three quarters of the antibiotics that dermatologists prescribe are in the tetracycline class.1 Even though dermatology as a specialty is well-known for off-label prescribing, it may be surprising to note that no systemic antibiotic had been FDA approved solely for treatment of acne—until recently. Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease affecting up to 70% of the population during their lifetime.1 Cutibacterium acnes is the primary target of acne pathogenesis, and oral antibiotics, namely oral tetracyclines, have been the mainstay of systemic acne treatment for decades. In addition, oral tetracyclines possess an indirect anti-inflammatory effect against acne.2,3 Oral tetracyclines are an important part of the acne treatment regimen, and substantial evidence exists for their efficacy and safety for use in inflammatory acne.4
In this supplement:

A Novel Antibiotic Just for Acne

Dermatologists consistently rank as the most frequent prescribers of systemic antibiotics, and one of the most common diagnoses for which we recommend these agents is acne vulgaris. Up to three quarters of the antibiotics that dermatologists prescribe are in the tetracycline class.1 Even though dermatology as a specialty is well-known for off-label prescribing, it may be surprising to note that no systemic antibiotic had been FDA approved solely for treatment of acne—until recently.

Read full article here. 

Oral Tetracyclines and Acne: A Systematic Review for Dermatologists

Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease affecting up to 70% of the population during their lifetime.1 Cutibacterium acnes is the primary target of acne pathogenesis, and oral antibiotics, namely oral tetracyclines, have been the mainstay of systemic acne treatment for decades. In addition, oral tetracyclines possess an indirect anti-inflammatory effect against acne.2,3 Oral tetracyclines are an important part of the acne treatment regimen, and substantial evidence exists for their efficacy and safety for use in inflammatory acne.4 

Read full article here.