Evaluation of an SPF50 Sunscreen Containing Photolyase and Antioxidants for its Anti-Photoaging Properties and Photoprotection

May 2022 | Volume 21 | Issue 5 | 517 | Copyright © May 2022


Published online April 15, 2022

Jessica A. Kern BSa, Emily Wood MDb, Rawaa Almukhtar MDc, Kunal Angra MDd, Michael Lipp DOe, Mitchel P. Goldman MDd

aUniversity of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, CA '
bWestlake Dermatology, Austin, TX
cHenry Ford Health System, Department of Dermatology, Detroit, MI
dCosmetic Laser Dermatology: A West Dermatology Company, San Diego, CA
eSkin Aesthetica, Redlands, CA

Abstract
Background: Background: Skin exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) causes DNA damage, which can lead to mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, cellular death, and photoaging. Signs of photoaging include wrinkling, erythema, skin laxity, uneven skin texture, and hyperpigmentation. Photolyase is an exogenous DNA repair enzyme that can restore DNA integrity when applied topically to human skin. Antioxidants also play a key role in reducing UVR-associated molecular damage.
Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of a tinted mineral-based sunscreen containing 10.7% zinc oxide (SPF50) with the active ingredients photolyase, antioxidants (Peptide Q10), and peptides in both protecting and repairing signs of photoaging. Methods: In an open-label, single-center, 12-week study, patients aged 35–55 years and Fitzpatrick skin phototypes II–IV applied the sunscreen daily for 84 days. VISIA photography was performed at baseline as well as 6- and 12-week follow-ups. At each visit, the investigator and subject evaluated clinical photoaging parameters including overall photodamage, fine lines/wrinkles, coarse lines/wrinkles, skin tone evenness, tactile roughness, and radiance.
Results: The Investigator Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (IGAIS) found that 63% of patients showed improvement at week 6 and 81% at week 12. The Subject Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (SGAIS) showed 58% and 62.5% of patients reported the appearance of their skin was improved at week 6 and 12, respectively. Overall, there was a statistically significant improvement in skin radiance as well as improvement in overall facial aesthetics reported by both investigators and subjects.
Conclusion: This tinted mineral based SPF50 sunscreen containing photolyase, antioxidants, and peptides is effective at repairing some clinical signs of photoaging and is well-tolerated for daily use.

J Drugs Dermatol. 2022;21(5):517-520. doi:10.36849/JDD.6503

INTRODUCTION

Skin exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) causes DNA damage, which can lead to mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, cellular death, and photoaging. The term photoaging refers to the premature aging of skin that results from chronic exposure to UVR. Histopathologically, photoaged skin shows a decreased collagen content, decreased elastin and disintegration of elastin fibers, and a reduced density of cutaneous microvasculature, among other microscopic changes.1 Clinical signs of photoaging include wrinkling, erythema, skin laxity, uneven skin texture, and hyperpigmentation. Although endogenous DNA repair mechanisms exist, some damage persists and can accumulate with continued UV exposure leading to permanent damage to the skin structure.

Photolyase is a naturally occurring DNA repair enzyme that uses a light-dependent process to restore DNA integrity but is absent in humans and other placental mammals. Numerous in vitro and clinical studies over the past several decades have supported the addition of exogenous photolyase to topical preparations to augment human DNA repair mechanisms, allowing for more efficient prevention and repair of UVR damage.2 This function has been demonstrated through the reversal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs),3-6 prevention of apoptotic cell death,5 as well as the treatment of mild to moderate actinic keratoses.7 Photolyase has also been shown to defend against photoaging through multiple mechanisms including the reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-64 and