Global Perspectives of the Patient of Color

July 2019 | Volume 18 | Issue 7 | Editorials | 615 | Copyright © July 2019

Cheryl M. Burgess, MD, FAAD

Abstract

Many cultures associate beauty with an even complexion. It has been shown in many reported references, the major cosmetic concern in patients of color is discoloration. This issue addresses discoloration of individuals of color and the use of a multitude of preparations that can blend the complexion. 

T he special focus of JDD helps to share knowledge from experienced key opinion leaders to help us better identify the critical differences in management of special patient populations, cosmetic concerns, and therapeutic of women and people of color.I commend the authors for deciphering between myths and knowledge gaps in aesthetic treatment of patients of color in this special focus issue. The issue is comprehensive in addressing specific concerns of the Black, Hispanic, Latino, and Asian female patients. 

Many cultures associate beauty with an even complexion. It has been shown in many reported references, the major cosmetic concern in patients of color is discoloration. This issue addresses discoloration of individuals of color and the use of a multitude of preparations that can blend the complexion. Authors in Asia, Sweden, France, and Brazil discuss the use of injectable deoxycholic acid in non-submental regions and hyaluronic acid for skin boosting, an off-label usage or procedures in the United States. Skin boosting improves hydration and the smoothness of the skin. Additionally, international methods of treating cosmetic patients with multiple modalities are discussed.

The JDD issue also includes an article on rosacea treatments with a focus on darker skin types. Additionally, the supplement addresses a novel treatment for seborrheic keratoses and specifically, reviews the risks related to treating skin of color. The need of prompt diagnosis and treatment of skin cancer reinforces the need to be more aware of the risk factors, the aggressive nature of melanoma, and the need for adequate sun protection.

Further study of how we approach treatment of special population groups, particularly women, in aesthetic areas is merited. We should further understand the emotional impact of a woman when she doesn’t exude a clear complexion. Clarity of the skin and appearance is the precursor to how a woman feels about herself, and we should shine a light on gaining a deeper understanding of the psychology of women in improving treatment regimens. Is a dermatologist simply improving or clearing a woman’s skin, or are we giving her greater power and freedom to live her best life?


Cheryl M. Burgess, MD, FAAD