Topical Treatment With Liposomal Sodium Copper Chlorophyllin Complex in Subjects With Facial Redness and Erythematotelangiectatic Rosacea: Case Studies

October 2015 | Volume 14 | Issue 10 | Case Report | 1157 | Copyright © 2015

David B. Vasily MD

Aesthetica Cosmetic and Laser Center, Bethlehem, PA

Abstract

Physicians are often presented with patients complaining of facial redness and difficult to control rosacea. The water soluble sodium copper chlorophyllin complex has been shown to have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-bacterial activities in vitro and anti-redness, pore reduction, and anti-acne activities in pilot clinical studies. In these case studies, the safety and efficacy of a topical gel containing a liposomal suspension of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex was assessed in subjects with facial redness and erythematotelangiectatic rosacea.

J Drugs Dermatol. 2015;14(10):1157-1159.

Purchase Original Article

Purchase a single fully formatted PDF of the original manuscript as it was published in the JDD.

Download the original manuscript as it was published in the JDD.

Contact a member of the JDD Sales Team to request a quote or purchase bulk reprints, e-prints or international translation requests.

To get access to JDD's full-text articles and archives, upgrade here.

Save an unformatted copy of this article for on-screen viewing.

Print the full-text of article as it appears on the JDD site.

→ proceed | ↑ close

INTRODUCTION

Complaints associated with facial redness and rosacea are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Rosacea is a chronic relapsing, inflammatory condition of the skin that typically involves the face in middle-aged and older adults.1-3 This inflammatory skin disorder, which presents as multiple subtypes, is characterized by transient (or sometimes persistent) central facial erythema, visible blood vessels, and often papules and pustules.4-5 While the etiology of rosacea is not fully understood, most current therapies are targeting the inflammatory cascade.6 Despite having both oral and topical medications approved by the FDA, lack of satisfactory outcomes from treatment continues to pose a major challenge.

Sodium copper chlorophyllin complex (CHLcu) has shown antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-bacterial properties in vitro.7-10 In addition, pilot clinical trials have shown benefits including anti-acne, anti-redness, and pore reduction.11, 12 The objective of these case studies was to assess the performance of a topical gel formulation containing a liposomal suspension of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex in treating the symptoms associated with facial redness and rosacea. A combination of standard digital photography and Beau Visage skin imaging (Astron Clinica, Cambridge, UK), which utilizes the principles of SIAscopy, were employed in assessing treatment effects.

CASE REPORTS

Patient #1: 30 year-old Caucasian Male With Fitzpatrick Skin Type II

Patient presented with a combination of acne and erythematotelangiectatic rosacea and was started on a topical gel formulation containing CHLcu at 0.01% BID. After 2 months of treatment, the skin appeared smoother with decreased redness and visible reduction in pore size (Figure 1).

Patient #2: 45 year-old Caucasian Female With Fitzpatrick Skin Type I

Patient had a diagnosis of rosacea and was receiving oral minocycline 100 mg daily without major change in her condition. She was started on a topical gel formulation containing CHLcu at 0.025% BID. After four weeks of treatment, her Colorimeter (KonicaMinolta CR10 Colorimeter, Tokyo, Japan) a+ readings in the right malar region decreased from 19.3 to 13 (Figure 2).

Patient #3: 61 year-old Caucasian Female With Fitzpatrick Skin Type II

Patient had facial redness associated with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea and was treated with oral minocycline 50 mg BID without change. She was started on a topical gel formulation containing CHLcu at 0.025% BID. Colorimeter a* readings were as follows:

table 1

A decrease in facial redness and smoother skin was observed after 5 weeks of treatment (Figure 3).

↑ back to top


Related Articles