Comparison Between Sequentional Treatment With Diode and Alexandrite Lasers Versus Alexandrite Laser Alone in the Treatment of Hirsutism

November 2011 | Volume 10 | Issue 11 | Original Article | 1255 | Copyright © 2011

Abstract

Laser systems that are commonly used for the treatment of hirsutism include the ruby laser (694 nm), the diode laser (800 nm), the alexandrite laser (755 nm) and the Nd:YAG laser (1084 nm). The diode laser and alexandrite laser are considered effective in treatment of hirsutism in dark-skinned patients. The response of hairs to these laser systems is variable and not complete. In this study, we compared the efficacy of these two laser systems for permanent hair removal. This was a randomized, controlled clinical trial that was performed with women of the age range 15−45 years old. After obtaining informed consent, the samples were randomized into two groups using random allocation software. The first group was treated with alexandrite laser alone (four sessions, two months apart). The second group was treated sequentially with diode laser for the first two sessions and alexandrite laser for the next two sessions. Overall, 111 patients (57 patients in the alexandrite laser group and 54 patients in the sequential diode-alexandrite laser group) were evaluated. There was no significant difference regarding mean of hair reduction between the two groups during the courses of treatment. Except for the first session, there was no significant difference regarding percent of patient satisfaction between the two groups (P value >0.05). Comparison between the two groups showed no significant difference one month, three months and six months after the last treatment (P value >0.05). Regarding the results of our study, there is no significant difference between sequential treatment with diode and alexandrite lasers versus alexandrite laser alone in the treatment of hirsutism. We suggest that in further studies, the efficacy of sequential treatment with other laser systems is evaluated against single treatment methods.

J Drugs Dermatol. 2011;10(11):1255-1259.

Purchase Original Article

Purchase a single fully formatted PDF of the original manuscript as it was published in the JDD.

Download the original manuscript as it was published in the JDD.

Contact a member of the JDD Sales Team to request a quote or purchase bulk reprints, e-prints or international translation requests.

To get access to JDD's full-text articles and archives, upgrade here.

Save an unformatted copy of this article for on-screen viewing.

Print the full-text of article as it appears on the JDD site.

→ proceed | ↑ close

INTRODUCTION

Unwanted hair growth remains a therapeutic challenge and there is a need for an effective, safe, and non-invasive treatment modality capable of removing hairs on a long-term basis. Excess hair growth covers a broad range of severity and may present as hypertrichosis or hirsutism. Hirsutism presents as excess hair growth in women at androgendependent sites.1

Many therapeutic modulations have been suggested for treatment of hirsutism; among them, laser hair removal is considered a safe, effective, and painless procedure.1

Laser systems that are commonly used for treatment of hirsutism include the ruby laser (694 nm), the diode laser (800 nm), the alexandrite laser (755 nm) and the Nd:YAG laser (1084 nm).1 The mechanisms by which these devices induce selective damage to hair follicles are based on the concept of selective photothermolysis.2 The red and near-infrared wavelengths allow for selective absorption by melanin combined with deep penetration into the dermis, and pulse durations shorter or equal to the thermal relaxation time of the hair follicles (about 10−50 ms) confine the thermal damage to the hair follicles.3

The diode laser and alexandrite laser are considered effective in the treatment of hirsutism in dark-skinned patients.4 The response of hairs to these laser systems is variable and not complete. In this study, we compared the efficacy of these two laser systems for permanent hair removal.

MATERIALS & Methods

This was a randomized, controlled clinical trial that was performed in women with the age range of 15–45 years. All of the

↑ back to top


Related Articles